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Full text of "The focus"

L- 

/^. 



T« FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



JUNE, 1930 



No. 6 







SClENte^ 






PublisKed by HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 




Courtesy of Hillyer C. Warlick, Macon, Ga. 

Brilliance with Delicacy 



Brilliance with delicacy, and com- 
plete adaptability to manipulation 
and printing requirements, have en- 
abled Agfa Portrait 
Film to brighten many 
a studio work-day. 



This fine film, so 
responsive to the pho- 
tographer's operating 




PORTRAIT 
FILM 



technique, quite naturally comes 
into more and more general use. 
For, sooner or later, professional 
judgment selects the 
best that can be found. 

There's a brancli or 
distributor near y o u 
prepared to give good 
service. 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON 



NEW YORK 



Agfa Ansco Limited, 204 King St. East, Toronto, Ont. 



Page tivo 



T. FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 

by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



JUNE, 1930 



No. 6 



IN THE PROFESSION 



"If'hat the 
army lost" 



Had it not been for 
parental objection, this 
I''' ^"^ #*^ article would not ap- 
mk ^^J P^^i" i" "The Focus," 

^N^MH ^"^'^ '" ^'^^ Army & 
l^^^^m Navy Journal, for 
William Lacy Gordon 
received an appoint- 
ment to West Point 
Military Academy. But let's start 
at the beginning. 

He is a native of Tennessee, the 
state that has given us evolution, 
Sgt. York, stills, feuds and other sub- 
jects to discuss. Add to this back- 
ground, the fact that his great-uncle. 
General John B. Gordon, became 
famous in the Civil War, and j'ou 
will realize what the Army lost. 

As a boy, he first aspired to a 
career of surgery and medicine. Later, 
the lure of footlights attracted his 
attention, and when his parents ob- 
jected to his appointment to West 
Point, he concentrated mostly on his 
real hobby, photography, which he 
learned while in high school. 

His studio in Exeter, Tulare 
County, is his first venture and has 
been a success from the start. 

Now his hobbies are several. He 
has won cups for fancy skating, and 
would like to travel and explore for- 
eign lands. He is a member of the 
Elks, and unmarried. 



WERE I WEALTHY 

Were I a wealthy citizen 

I'd help the worthy poor 
Who daily cudgel off the wolf 

That lingers 'round the door. 
I'd feed the hungry, heal the sick, 

I'd clothe the naked, too; 
There'd hardly be an end to all 

The kindly things I'd do. 

Were I a wealthy citizen 

I'd take each orphan chick 
And send him to the finest school — 

I'd do that mighty quick. 
I'd say to worried widows who 

Could see no light ahead 
'Tear not, for I'll protect you all — 

Think not that hope is dead." 

Were I wealthy citizen 

I'd seek out struggling youths 
Who fought 'gainst Penury to gain 

Fair Learning's hidden truths. 
I'd let them go through college till 

They reached the outfield fence 
And not one dollar should they 
pay— 

'Twould be at my expense. 

Were I a wealthy citizen 

(Let's deal with facts a while) 
I'd lie awake at nights and scheme 

How to increase my pile. 
I'd sit around on Easy street 

And plan and plan and plan 
A hundred other brand-new ways 

To skin my fellow man. 

STRICKLAND GILLILAN. 



Page three 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




Good Frames help to sell 

pROTOqRAPRS 

Good Photographs help to sell 

pRAMESl 

Big Profits 
>* Small Investment 



No. 306 

Siluer Only 

4%x6% and 7x9% only 

$3.00 each list 

Remarkable Ualuesl 

Big Assortment! 





No. 314 






Platinum Finish Only 

4%x6% or 7x9% 

$3.00 each list 



No. H 306 
(Horizontal) 

Silver (Toned) 

or 

Platinum (Toned) 

7x9% only 

$3.00 each list 

QUALITY is a feature of every one 
of these beautiful frames. They are 
carefully assembled — highly burnish- 
ed — and finished neatly in attractive 
tones. The platinum finish is a little 
warmer than the tone, making perfect 
color harmony for the photographs or 
pictures of any color. 

All frames have FELT BASES. 

Seventeen styles, sizes 4x6 to 10x13. 
Horizontal and vertical. Silver, Plati- 
num, Polychrome tones. 

Low Prices. Goods in stock. Attrac- 
tive Discounts. 

Write to 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

For New llhist rated Catalogue 



Page four 






t THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




Thie; 



For transporting developing and 
fixing solutions, lead and hard rubber 
piping is satisfactory and should be 
used in connection with Monel, 
nickel, lead-lined, or silver-plated fau- 
cets. Hard rubber or stoneware fau- 
cets should be used, especially if con- 
tinual exposure to the solutions is 
necessary. Tinned, tin-lined, copper, 
or brass faucets or piping should be 
avoided for use with developers or 
fixing solutions. For conveying dis- 
tilled water, however, pipe-lines and 
fittings of block tin soldered with 
pure tin solder are satisfactory. Lead 
piping joints should be "wiped" or 
lead-burned, and not soldered. Pumps 
of Monel, phosphor bronze or hard 
rubber are satisfactory for developers 
and fixing baths if cleaned after use. 
If silver-plated apparatus is used, the 
plating should be free from pinholes 
or scratches which may later expose 
the metal underneath, with resulting 
corrosion. 

In selecting materials for the con- 
struction of photographic processing 
apparatus, the following precautions 
should be taken : 

A. Do not permit tin, copper, or 
alloys containing these metals to come 
in contact with developing solutions, 
especially concentrated developers, be- 
cause more or less of the tin or cop- 
per will dissolve and cause either 
serious chemical fog or rapid oxida- 
tion of the developer. Contact of two 
or more different metals or alloys ex- 
posed to a developer will hasten the 
rate of corrosion of the metal and 



_ I Yoe SlhoeM 

The Action of Photographic Solutions 
On Plumbing- and Tanks 

thus increase the amoiuit of fog ob- 
tained. Soldered joints are particu- 
larly to be avoided with developers, 
but if such joints are unavoidable a 
low-tin solder or one free from tin 
should be used and the joints so made 
that a minimum of solder is exposed 
to the solution. 

B. For fixing, toning, and acid 
oxidizing solutions such as acid per- 
manganate, avoid metal whenever pos- 
sible. If a metal must be used, the 
apparatus should be constructed of a 
single metal, preferably nickel, lead 
or Monel for fixing baths. 

C. Apparatus constructed of alum- 
inimi, zinc, or galvanized iron should 
not be used with either developers or 
fixing baths since these metals react 
with such solutions with the forma- 
tion of precipitates which leave a de- 
posit on the film and often-times stain 
the gelatin. 

D. Plated metals should be avoid- 
ed whenever possible for use with 
photographic solutions and only single 
metals or alloys used in preference, 
since electrolytic corrosion sets in as 
soon as a little of the plating wears 
of^". 

E. For fixing baths or strong sa- 
line solutions, avoid porous materials 
such as incompletely glazed earthen- 
ware, impregnated fibrous materials, 
or rubber compositions, because crys- 
tallization of the salts within the 
pores of the materials causes disinte- 
gration in a manner similar to that of 
ice in weathering rocks. 

F. Trays or tanks coated with lac- 
quer or baked japan are not resistant 
to strongly alkaline developers. 



Page five 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



NEW ENTHUSIASTIC BOOSTERS--DAILY 



Photographers are uncovering the hid- 
den possibilities of this wonder lens daily 
and proclaim it their choice because the 



SERIES B BEACH MULTI-FOCAL LENS 




works at a greater speed and 
has more depth of focus than 
any other lens of equal speed 
or focal length, is remarkably 
free from distortion and pro- 
duces a mellowness that les- 
sons retouching". It is unex- 
celled for group, studio and 
home portraiture, and can be 
used advantageously in com- 
mercial, copying and enlarg- 
ing work. 



Let your dealer place one with 
you on a trial basis. 



Made by 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

Hudson Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of quality shullers and lenses 
for all pliases of pliotography. 



Page six 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

T^wo "Well Kmo^H^ii Lenses 

Supreme for portraiture and child photography The most popular and practical soft-focus lens 




VITAX 

Portrait /3.8 

WHILE the \'itax is not a general-purpose 
studio lens like the Series II, it is par- 
ticularly suited to portrait work and child 
photography. 

In making child portraits and baby pictures 
speed of lens is all-important. The Vitax works 
at {'S.8 — a practical speed for a portrait lens. 
With this rapidity, snapshot exposures in the 
studio are entirely practical. 

Vitax portraits, particularly large heads and 
busts, have a rounded, standing-out quality that is 
life-like and beautiful. This effect is due in part to 
the improved Petzval formula of the lens. Of value, 
too, to the i:)ortrait photographer is the diffusing 
device which gives a slight softness when desired. 

If your light is poor, your negatives under- 
timed ; if you desire a nicer quality in your por- 
traits ; if you want certain success in photograph- 
ing the youngsters — consider the Vitax Portrait 
f3.8. 



No. 


1 

1 Focus 

1 

1 10 in. 
1 13J/i in. 
1 16 in. 
1 20 in. 


Lens . 
Diam. 

3 in. 
3i/< in. 
4-^ in. 
4^ in. 


Speed 

Hi 


In 
Barrel 


1 In 
Studio 
Shutter 


3 
4 
S 
7 


$105.00 
135.00 
185.00 
200.00 


$110.00 
140.00 
186.00 
201.00 



VITAX EXTENSION LENS 
to be used with 16" focus, increasing focus to 20", 

$57.50 




VERITO 

Diffused Focus /4 

A PIONEER among soft focus lenses, the 
Verito has contributed greatly to the ad- 
vancement of pictorial phase of photography. 

Any degree of softness or sharpness may be 
obtained by simply changing the diaphragm. 
Definition is not destroyed, but pleasingly 
subdued so that retouching is practically 
eliminated. The long-focus rear element may 
be used alone. In enlarging, too, it gives 
beautiful results. The Verito improves on 
acquaintance, and the longer you use it, the 
more delighted 30U will be with its infinite 
possibilities. 

There is a Verito to fit practically every 
studio, view, Graflex, hand and movie 
camera. 





Equiv. Rear i In 


In 


In 


No. 


Size 1 Focus | Focus 


Barrel 

$22.50 


Studio 


Betax 


*A 


3'/4X 4'^ 


5 in. 


10 in. 




$24.50 


*\i 


4 X 5 


6Y2 in. 


14 in. 


25.00 




29.00 


1 


3i^x 414 


6J^ in. 


10 in. 


28.50 




34.50 




4 X 5 


1% in. 


11 in. 


32.50 




41.50 


3 


5 X 7 


SH in. 


14 in. 


42.50 




53.00 


4 


6.Vjx 9,V2 


ll'/i in. 


20 in. 


60.00 


$65.00 




5 


8 X 10 


141/4 in. 


24 in. 


85.00 


90.00 




7 


11 X 14 


18 in. 


30 in. 


110.00 


111.00 





*;ize A and B, /6 — all others/4. 

Veritos of special speed 5" focus or shorter 

in Barrel $25.00 

CINE VERITO — Information on request. 

VERITO EXTENSION LENS 

to be used with 18" focus, increasing focus to 22i4", 

$20.00 



These lenses, so desirable in your studio, can be purchased 
on convenient monthly payments. Order nov^, w^ith pnvilege 
of 10 days' trial, from mRSC^ & KAYE. 



Paffe seven 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

Norwill Flash Powder 

Instantaneous - Clean - Smokeless 

No Cinders or Flying Sparks 



At last the perfect "smokeless" 
flash powder is here. NORWIL 
PRESS FLASH is the result of 
years of research and experi- 
ment. It has no smoke, is fast 
and makes very little noise or 
report. Absolutely clean! No 
shower of cinders or flying 
sparks. Has the highest endorse- 
ment of leading Press and Com- 
mercial photographers. 
How often have you, Mr. Photog- 
rapher, been called upon to make 
the portrait of a new arrival at 
the hotel, a home party, office 
scene, or banquet, where an 
"open flash" would be the quick- 
est and most efficient lighting 
medium to use. 

With NORWILL PRESS FLASH 
you can make not only one ex- 
posure, but several, without 
smoking up the interior in which 
you may be operating. 

The novelty of making a flash 
shot without the usual smoke, is 



also an advantage which should 
not be overlooked. It will invari- 
ably call forth favorable com- 
ment from your subjects. 
NORWILL PRESS FLASH reg 
isters in illumination comparable 
with non-smokeless powders 
when fast Panchromatic Plate or 
Film is used. When other than 
Panchromatic negative material 
is used, slightly more of the 
smokeless powder may be neces- 
sary. This point, however, is of 
small consequence when you con- 
sider the many advantages 
gained by using NORWILL 
PRESS FLASH. 



NORWIL PRESS FLASH 100 grams 

(31^ oz.) . . $2.85 in U.S.A. 
(Slightly higher in Canada and Mexico) 

CAN BE SENT BY MAIL 

Order today 
from HIRSCH & KAYE 



When Retouching use A. W. Faber's 




THE FINEST PENCIL MADE 

17 degrees of hardness 6 degrees for positive 1 degree sepia 

WRITE US YOUR NEEDS OR TELL OUR SALESMEN 



Page eight 



[ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



P, A. of A, 50th Aimiversary 



FIFTY years ago, the call went 
out to organize an association of 
photographers. 

The Chicago Photographic Asso- 
ciation at a meeting held March 3, 
1880, issued the appeal. The photo- 
graphic journals supported the Chi- 
cago men. ■ A number of active pho- 
tographers in other cities advocated 
the plan. 

The secretary of the Chicago Pho- 
tographic Association w^as then G. A. 
Douglas. In a talk at a Chicago 
meeting, November 5, 1879, he had 
suggested the name, Photographers' 
Association of America. This is said 
to be the first mention of the name 
which finally was adopted. 

FIRST CONVENTION CALLED 

A month and a half after the issu- 
ing of the appeal, a group of photog- 
raphers met in Chicago to discuss the 
responses to the circular. They were 
found to be exceedingly favorable. 
Other meetings were held and a con- 
vention called, the dates being set for 
August 23, 1880, in Chicago. 

Photographers had previously been 
organized, but their association had 
died out. 

At several periods after photog- 
raphy became practical in 1840, the 
photographers organized, sometimes 
by states, several times in a broader 
way, but the profession and the or- 
ganization were young and had not 
yet acquired great stability. 

The particular reason why profes- 
sional photographers organized at 
that time was that the Cutting bro- 
mide process patent Avas about to ex- 
pire and the owners were seeking a 
re-issue of the patent. 

USED WET PLATES THEN 

At that time photography was a 
wet plate process. Dry plates were 



just making their appearance and 
photographers were not sure that they 
would serve as well as wet plates. 
If the Cutting patent for sensitizing 
collodion plates was renewed, photog- 
raphers would be dependent on the 
one concern for their plates. 

This situation brought leading pho- 
tographers, material dealers and edi- 
tors together and led to the organi- 
zation of the National Photographic 
Association. 

Opposition by this organization 
prevented the re-issue of the Cutting 
patent. 

After this event interest in the or- 
ganization appears to have subsided. 
Conventions were held, but atten- 
dance was small and dues were not 
paid. In 1876 the association died a 
natural death and for fourteen years 
no national association existed. 

FIRST P. A. OF A. CONVENTION 

When the new Photographers' As- 
sociation of America met at the ban- 
quet table in Chicago, August 23, 
1880, to open the first session, a group 
of 237 enthusiastic photographers an- 
swered the roll call. J. F. Ryder of 
Cleveland presided. H. Rocher of 
Chicago was treasurer and A. J. W. 
Copelin secretary. 

In the several-days sessions a con- 
stitution was adopted, committees 
were appointed and organization was 
continued. 

Gelatin dry plates, a new inven- 
tion, were exhibited by manufacturers 
at the meeting and created intense in- 
terest. They were an unknown quan- 
titv, but demonstrations showed that 
they could be readily handled and 
that they allowed an exposure of two 
or three seconds as against twenty or 
thirty seconds for the wet plate. 



Paffe nine 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



The Same Results 



One of the 
"Physically and 
Chemically 
Perfected Photo 
Chemicals" 
by 




Today 
Next Week 
Next Year 



Always 

Free 

Running 




Keeps indefinitely without changing in 
strength because it is 

MONOHYDMATED 

The only stable kind of Sodium Carbonate having 
a fixed strength for a given weight. 
Your formulas require a definite amount of alkali 
for proper contrast, tone values and uniform speed 
of development. Only the use of Monohydrated 
Sodium Carbonate can give you this assurance. 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since 1867 

ST. LOUIS MONTREAL PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



Page ten 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 





Rex Print Washer 

The Rex Print Washer washes 
prints and films in the quickest time 
by a perfect method, and is the only 
washer on the market that absolutely 
requires no attention during the pro- 
cess. It will run with 15 to 20 lbs. 
water pressure. The water that runs 
it is used to wash the prints. No 
extra expense for power. 

The prints are encaged in a cylin- 
der. The water pressure is forced up 
from the bottom of a tank and strikes 
the cage, forcing it to revolve in such 
a manner that makes it impossible for 
the prints to adhere to the cylinder. 
By means of a forced outlet, the 
prints are washed with a continuous 
change of water. When it is re- 
quired to remove prints, the cylinder 
or cage is raised and the water is 
drained without touching the prints. 
The washer can be conected to any 
faucet by a rubber hose. The outlet 
is arranged at the sides of the tank 
in such a manner as to take the water 
from the center of the tank and raise 
to the top of the outlet tube, which is 
on the outside of the tank. The tank 



Portrait Film Washing 
Tank 

An extremely efficient washer. Wa- 
ter flows in at bottom and rises evenly 
through perforations in a false bot- 
tom, escaping through holes near the 
top. A cross piece, supplied, provides 
for hanging both 5x7 or 8x10 film 
in the tank at the same time. Ac- 
commodates 18 No. 2, or 24 No. 4, 
Portrait Film Hangers in the 8x10 
size, and 24 No. 2, or 32 No. 4, 5x7 
hangers. Made of heavy sheet metal. 
Inside measurements: 10^x163^ x- 
10^/2 inchees. 

Portrait Film Washing Tank 
$6.50. 

is drained by means of removing a 
screw cap placed at the end. 

Estimate your time at 50c per hour 
on an eight-hour day. A Rex ma- 
chine. No. 5, costing only $20.00, 
will pay for itself in labor saving 
alone in 5 days. 

No. lbs. Will wash — Price 

4—18—61/2x81/2 or 200—4x6 $15.00 

5—25—10x12 or 300—4x6 20.00 

6—30—11x14 or 400—4x6 25.00 

7—38—16x20 or 600—4x6 or 

125—8x10 30.00 

8—50— 18x22— 800— 4x6 or 

200—8x10 35.00 

In Stock At 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



Page eleven 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




Putz Pomade 

Putz Pomade is a smooth working 
friction reducer. As a local reducer 
this preparation is without a peer. It 
is applied with a soft cloth or tuft of 
cotton. Since the action is pureh^ me- 
chanical it is entirely at the command 
of the retoucher at all times. 

The use of Putz Pomade permits 
the operator to reduce any portion of 
the negative to just the exact degree 
desired. The preparation is so fine 
that it may be applied to the most 
delicate portion of the negative, and 
it will never scratch. It reduces 
more evenly because of its smooth 
consistency; morevover, it is indis- 
pensable for bringing up hair, draper- 
ies, and the light portions of the pic- 
ture. 

Putz Pomade is supplied in con- 
venient tins. It never becomes-caked, 
lasts longer than other similar prepa- 
rations, and does not leave the nega- 
tive greasy. Photographers and others 
will be gald to know that this very 
popular reducing paste is now availa- 
ble in our stock. Mr. Beattie rec- 
ommended the use of Putz Pomade, 
during his school of lighting. 

We offer the preparation in con- 
venient three ounce tins for 25 cents 
each. 



From the Melting Pot f 

to your Bank Account ! 

ALBO I 

gets all the silver from 3'our [ 

Hypo Solution j 

THE IDEAL PRECIPITANT j 

— Cleaji, odorless, speedy, : 

complete recovery 1 

$3.00 for 5 Lb. Can j 

Full directions enclosed | 

PREPARED BY | 

Wildberg Bros. Smelting j 

& Refining Co. j 

SAN FRANCISCO j 

Who will buy all the recovered 1 

silver at highest market price | 

I DISTRIBUTED BY \ 

i HIRSCH & KAYE j 



LABOR & 
EXPENSE 



Stop Waste — Reduce 

Itisstall 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFITS 

for Amateur Finishing, Commercial & Professional 
Work. Low Cost. Low Upkeep. Best Rosults. 
Made of the very finest porcelain enamel. 

STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 



BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



Be sure you 

see 
STERLING 
on every tank. 



TURNS 
OUT 



Page twelve 




f THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

It's All in the Day s Work 



The life of a traveling salesman 
is far from monotonous. Along the 
highways and byways of life, he sees 
life in its various phases, and his ex- 
periences range from drab to humor- 
ous, with an occasionl touch of ro- 
mance. 

Our Mr. Bush is no exception. 
On a recent trip, en route from Susan- 
ville to Reno, he came upon a broken 
down car, miles from a garage. A 
young girl, perhaps 16, was sitting on 
the running board, weeping, while 
nearby was a young man, not much 
older, looking as though he had lost 
his last friend. The car (of light 
weight and unknown age) had a bro- 
ken front axle. 

Mr. Bush stopped to offer assist- 
ance. They were newly-weds, on 
their honeymoon, and enroute to a 
Nevada town, where the bride had 
been promised a position in a cream- 
ery. We don't mean to infer that 
the groom's working days were over ; 
we just don't recall what plans he 
had, if any. 

]VIr. Bush offered to take them to 
Doyle, to arrange for towing and 
repairs to the car, but that wouldn't 
do as previous repairs had taken all 
but $1.50 of their money. So he put 
their baggage into his car, and invited 
them to ride to Reno with him. As 
a precaution against theft, he remov- 
ed the tires from their disabled car 
and tied them on the back of his car, 
over his own. Truly, his car looked 
as though he had "retired." 

By this time, the bride was smiling 
through her tears, and enroute, glanc- 
ing into his mirror, Mr. Bush saw 
them bill and coo as only newly-weds 
can. 

On their arrival in Reno, their 
troubles were not over. The fare to 



their ultimate destination was much 
more than their resources and there 
was no train out till the next day. 
And here's where Mr. Bush's re- 
sourcefulness saved the situation. 

Driving to Automobile Row, he 
went from one dealer to another, off- 
ering the used tires from the disabled 
Car. Offers ranged from a blunt NO 
to a few dollars, but finally, when the 
circumstances were explained, one 
dealer raised the offer to $12.00. Mr. 
Bush held out for more, but the 
bride "spilled the beans" by joyously 
accepting the offer. 

With a new start, the groom sent 
a telegram to the bride's employer, 
asking him to come and get them, to 
which he replied he would. Select- 
ing a suitable hotel for them, Mr. 
Bush brought their baggage to their 
room, and after wishing them a life 
of peaches and cream and much hap- 
piness, he left them. 



When mixing a chemical solution, 
if solutions are not filtered, a scum 
usually rises to the surface consisting 
of fibers, dust, etc., which should be 
skimmed off with a towel. 

When a fixing bath has been used 
for some time and is allowed to stand 
undisturbed for a few days, any hy- 
drogen sulphide gas which may be 
present in the atmosphere forms a 
metallic looking scum of silver sul- 
phide at the surface of the liquid, and 
on immersing the film this scum at- 
taches itself to the gelatin and re- 
mains even after washing. Any such 
scum should be carefully removed 
with a sheet of blotting paper or by 
using a skimmer made of several lay- 
ers of cheese cloth stretched on a 
frame before the solution is used. 



Page thirl e en 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

Specializiiig 

That's what Hammer Laboratories are doing 
in the making of negative emulsions. 
If you will compare the print-quality 
from these emulsions, point for point, 
with the prints from any other negative 
material, you're bound to see how you 
can make your dream for better prints 
and a better business come true. 

"NOTHING IS BETTER EXCEPT BY COMPARISON" 



RES. TRADE MARK 



Write for free portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 

159 West 22nd St., Ohio Ave & Miami St., 

New York City St. Louis 



CHAMCOAL BLACK 

AN UNUSUAL PAPER /or PROJECTION PRINTING 

Designed for those who luish their prints to command attention 
and produce new business 

Grade "A" Thin Parchment — Grade "B" Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury Vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc lamps. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Page fourteen 



t THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed in Oil, 
Water Color, Black and White, Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 420 ' ' Phone Prospect 0476 



SAVE TIME, WORRY, and MONEY 

By having your Quantity Printing done 
by a firm that speciaHzes in 

QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

All sizes up to 11x14 

Minimum 100 from Negative 

Quick Service Work Guaranteed 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 

86 Third St. SAN FRANCISCO 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 

LOUIS C. RESTEER 

5703 College Avenue 
Oakland - - - Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

by expert of years of experience 
Mail orders solicited 

Prompt Service Prices Reasonable 

MATILDA S. RANSDELL 

3100 Fulton Street 

BAYVIEW 4584 San Francisco 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

2916 STEINER STREET 
San Francisco, Calif. 



EVER READY SERVICE 

Photographic prints, Opal or 
Ivorette Miniatures — artistically 
done in real oils or tints — from 
one to quantities. 



Retouching 

Choose from our 
staff of competent 
retouchers tlie ones 
you like best to do 
your retouching. 

Mail Orders 




Prompt Attention 



EVER READY SERVICE 

Phone GRaystone 7912 HS? Geary St. 

QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to the Trade 

ALT A STUDIOS, INC. 

1271 Mission St. SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone MArket 9581 



Page fifteen 



[ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




OssiAN Hagan, Watsonville suf- 
fered a painful and very annoying 
accident when a heavy metal weight 
fell on his foot. Somehow he man- 
aged to get around to do the most 
important work of the studio pend- 
ing his recovery. 

The ViALES Studio has been 
moved from 230 4th Avenue to 628 
Clement Street in San Francisco's 
residential section. The new studio 
was formally opened on June 1 
with complete and modern equip- 
ment, and a baby contest put on in 
conjunction with a motion picture 
theatre will bring people into the new 
studio from the start. Mr. Viales 
has been at his former location for the 
past two years. 

Albert Peterson, San Mateo 
photographer, announces a display of 
55 prints in the Palace of the Legion 
of Honor, Lincoln Park, San Fran- 
cisco. The pictures will occupy a 
room of their own and wnll be open 
to the public for the month of June. 
Local and visiting photographers are 
invited. 

F. E. Bellus has opened a new, 
attractive studio at 483 Scabright 
Avenue, Santa Cruz. Mr. Bellus has 
many friends in Santa Cruz, where 
he has been located for some time. 



H. Tracy Webb of Oakland an- 
nounces the opening of his new stu- 
dio at 3601 Folsom Boulevard, Sac- 
ramento. He will continue the Oak- 
land Studio as his clientele is divided 
between the Bay Region and Sacra- 
mento Valley. 

Arthur C. Pillsbury, the well- 
known naturalist photographer, sailed 
May 24 for the Fiji Islands. He vnW 
make his headquarters at Suva, and 
is taking with him equipment for un- 
derwater motion picture photography, 
as well as electrically-operated motion 
pictvire cameras and photo-micro- 
graphic work. 

Mr. Pillsbury has been tendered 
the use of the Government Labora- 
tory at Suva. He also bears creden- 
tials from the Museum of Natural 
Histor}^ at New York, and the Geo- 
graphic Society at Washington. 

R. H. Wheldon of the Sunset 
Studio, Petaluma, suffered from an 
infection of his eye. We are happy 
to feel that we were able to help him 
when our optical department fur- 
nished suitable tinted glasses to sub- 
due the light. 

R. P. Whigham is one of the best 
known San Francisco photographers 
and his studio is among the oldest. 
Recently, he and Mrs. Whigham 



Page sixteen 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



drove to Portland and Seattle to visit 
relatives, including some he had not 
seen before. How he managed to 
get along v^nthout his daily golf is 
something we would like to know. 

J. A. Meiser has opened a new 
studio at Ocean Park, California. 
For several years he had a studio in 
the Sacramento Valley, at Willows, 
which we recall was in a fireproof 
building especially constructed as a 
modern studio. 

Fisherman, Attention: The YosHi- 
ZATO Studio, on Fillmore Street, 
San Francisco, photographed a sea 
bass five feet long and weighing 36 
pounds. No, the photographer didn't 
catch it ; he made the pictures for a 
customer. The fish was caught on 
the beach at Marin County, and later 
was stuffed and displayed in a down 
town store, there to further tantalize 
the tired business man. 

F. G. Anderson has opened a new 
studio at 1034 State Street, Santa 
Barbara. Mr. Anderson is a recent 
arrival in California and has had 
successful experience in eastern states. 
He selected Santa Barbara after a 
thorough survey of the whole state. 

The Darling Studio has moved 
from the Lithia Springs Hotel, Ash- 
land, Oregon, to new quarters. The 
new location is also on the ground 
floor, on the main street, and pro- 
vides a floor space 50x120 feet, and a 
large basement for storage and work 
rooms. 

Don't make any dates for Aug. 21- 
22 or 23. You are wanted at the 
P. I. P. A. Convention, Olympic Hotel, 
Seattle. For more information, write 
to C. F. Richardson, Sec'y, Box 52, 
Milwaukee, Oregon. 



Mr. and Mrs. Holmboe, of Rose- 
ville, were recent visitors. Their visit, 
like previous calls, left the unmistak- 
able impression that here is a couple 
that knows and thoroughly enjoys art, 
especially that which is revealed in 
pictures. 

Several of our office staff have 
been, are, or will be suffering from 
sunburn, caused by unaccustomed ex- 
posure to the sun at the beaches. 
Suggestions to alleviate their suffer- 
ing may be sent in care of Jerry. 

Have you noticed the new picture 
on the other page? Mr. Charles- 
worth has been making local calls 
for several months but not till re- 
cently could we persuade him to break 
down his natural modesty, and submit 
his picture. Now that you recognize 
him, he will appreciate continued 
courtesy when he calls. 

Mr. Peterson withdrew his pic- 
ture to make room for his associate, 
but that does not mean any change in 
his calls. 

The DuRFEE Studio, San Jose, 
won a prize for most original float 
in the recent Fiesta De Las Rosas. 
The float depicted a couple being pho- 
tographed in the days of head rests, 
leg of mutton sleeves, flat derbys and 
walrus mustaches. All these trim- 
mings were faithfully reproduced to 
the amusement of the spectators. 

When a print has been ordered for 
the newspaper or some other special 
purpose, be sure to follow it up with 
a call on the person having the sitting 
and endeavor to sell him on an order 
for his own use. Mail the proofs to 
the customer for his inspection on ap- 
proval. 



Page seventeen 



For Perfect Pictures] 




( Call it /G\ Gan-^ert) 



Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

K'33 - Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address Dept. No. 8 

1 lie vJevaert Liompany of America, Inc. 
423-439 W. 55th St. New York City 



Chicago, III. 
4ia-421 N. State Street 



Toronto, Ont. 
347-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH & KAYE, 

San Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Dependable Mercliandisc Loiv Prices 



[ THE FOCUS 

Aerial Survey 

An aerial survey of the Salinas 
Valley is referred to in the March 
issue of "The Focus." At the time 
the article was written we were not 
familiar with the name of the photog- 
rapher who did the work but addi- 
tional information has since come to 
us. 

The pictures were made by H. A. 
Erickson of San Diego who is better 
known as Erickson, the Flying Pho- 
tographer. The area was mapped in 
16 days time and over 5000 negatives 
were made. Two K5 cameras were 
used and more than 32,000 contact 
prints were required to complete the 
map. The assembly or map measures 
24x32 feet and all of the work from 
signing the contract to delivery of the 
complete order was completed within 
ten weeks. 

An explanation of the equipment 
that can handle an order of this kind 
will be of interest. Mr. Erickson 
uses the Stineman System for develop- 
ing the aerial film, which comes in 
75-foot rolls and a roll of film is de- 
veloped, fixed, washed and dried 
every 40 minutes. 

The mechanical equipment in- 
cludes Eastman 11x14 printers, Pako- 
doper and Pako Gang Washer, as 
well as two belt dryers. One of these 
dryers has a 30-inch apron and the 
other is 50 inches in width. The 
equipment installed makes it possible 
to prepare negatives 20x24 inches 
from completed maps and these nega- 
tives can be enlarged to 12-foot 
lengths. Enlarged maps 10x12 feet 
and even 13^^ feet square have been 
made. You will have a better idea 
of what this equipment will accom- 
plish when we tell you that it is pos- 
sible to map and deliver surveys of 
2,000 to 2,500 square miles per week. 
Those mathematically inclined might 
figure how long would be required to 



for JUNE, 1930 } 

make an aerial map of California and 
then the whole United States. 



Prints properly mounted 
are a credit 

There is a difference. The advan- 
tage of delivering well mounted pho- 
tographs to your customers is inestim- 
able. They make a good impression 
when handed out and by always stay- 
ing smooth and flat and holding their 
shape, are a lasting credit to their 
maker. 

In order to obtain these good 
mounting results j'ou must give 
thought to the medium used. There 
is no mountant which gives more 
complete satisfaction, is easier to use, 
and pleases more than SURE- 
STICK, that white, odorless liquid 
glue which sure sticks and never 
cracks loose because it was made for 
photographic work. Does not draw 
or discolor. It is used by the par- 
ticular workman everywhere. It goes 
farther than others as so little is re- 
quired. Get your jar today . . . we 
have it. 



San Francisco as a 
Seaport 

San Francisco's port employs an 
average of 500 persons ; represents a 
minimum of $75,000,000; has 43 
piers, 15 passenger ferry slips; two 
terminals, 19 miles of berthing space; 
1 miles of waterfront ; a grain termi- 
nal ; a fruit and produce terminal ; a 
pipe line and tanks for Oriental vege- 
table oils ; a fumigation plant ; a fish- 
ermen's wharf and a ferry terminal 
building through which pass annually 
more than 50,000,000 persons ; serves 
146 steamship companies and handles 
over 11,000,000 tons of cargo an- 
nually; owns a belt line railroad op- 
erated on 58 miles of State-owned 
track. 



Page nineteetf 



[ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



I AT last! cJ Pierfecl Mailer \\ 

I WE SELL ! 

I ^eNeivIngenta \ 

i Photo M^ler j 




I 9J/S Mailer has the only I 

! EXCLUSIVE DOUBLE SEAL FEATURE I 



MADE IN THE FOLLOWING 
POPULAR SIZES 

No. 2...^ 51/2 X 7% 

No. 3 6%x 814 

No. 4.-. -- 7% X 91/2 

*No. 5 - - 8% X 101/2 

*No. 6 10% X 123/8 

*No. 7 1214x141/2 

*No. 8 101/2 x 15 

No. 9..- - 61,4 x 914 

*No. 10 -— 7% X 11% 

*No. 11 -- 81/2X 111/2 

*No. 12 13 X 171/2 

No. 14 16 X2014 

Packed in cartons containing 50 



The New INGENTO Photo Mailer 

Has the only double seal feature of string fastener 
and gummed flap, making it possible to mail photos 
to foreign countries or send them by first-class mail 
when privacy or additional safety is desired. 

The INGENTO is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking pho- 
tographs, drawings, sketches or any other valuable matter 
when this mailer is used, as they are perfectly preserved by 
the double corrugated board which covers the photograph or 
drawing both front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. The vari- 
ous sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popular 
up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios throughout 
the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now made 
8% X 11% inches. It will accommodate photographs 8x10 
or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with super- 
strength corrugated boai-d ; it is ideal for large prints, 
folders, enlargements and drawings. 

Manufactured by 

BURKE & JAMES, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH & KAYE 

SIZES for any need PRICES none can meet! 

Prompt Shipments 




SURESTICK 

The New Vacuum 
Dispenser 

A White 
Liquid Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready; sticks quickly; 
does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints; will not get stiff when ex- 
posed to air. 

Surestick Never Cracks Loose 

whether slip under, comer mounts, parchment or tlpped-on sheets. For gluing- 
prints in albums, sealing backs of picture frames, plaque work — any place a 
high grade adhesive is required it is far superior. Only small amount required. 
A trial will convince you Surestick IS RIGHT. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint 55c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars— Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 
Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Pa^e iivcniy 



{ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

This is Film Season 



It's a trite question, "How can 
you afford not to sell Kodak Film 
But the answer is far from stale. It 
is, in fact, as fresh as tomorrow's 
business . . . and as important. 

Kodak Film, because it is always 
dependable; always uniform; because 
it always offers speed and wide lati- 
tude — always meets the needs of the 
amateur and, as a result, always pro- 
vides the greatest average number of 
prints per roll. 

Trite maybe, but true . . . and 
decidedly profitable. Write for our 
discounts. 



"Out of sight, out of mind" and 
we might add, "out of date." The 
smart retailer who wants business 
keeps his merchandise in view — in 
the window ; in the store ; and his cus- 
tomers, therefore, keep that merchan- 
dise in mind . . . and the dealer 
doesn't keep it too long on his shelves. 



Can you use a film dispensing cabi- 
net? Sent on request. 



When a customer leaves a roll of 
film at your counter to be finished, 
it's the beginning of profits for you. 



A SHORT LONG STORY FOR YOU 

Mrs. Brown buys film; cash reg- 
ister rings merrily. Mrs. Brown takes 
pictures; leaves roll for developing 
and printing ; cash register again 
peals out. Mrs. Brown calls for fin- 
ished prints, and again the pleasing 
tinkle of the cash receptacle is heard. 
There is no end to this story . . . 
it goes on, and on, and on. 



BUILD BIGGER BUSINESS 

The phrase, "Any good picture is 
a better picture, enlarged," is old 
stuff, but it's true . . . and the dem- 
onstration of the fact is the easiest 
way to sell enlargements. 

A graphic comparison features the 
new enlargement stuffer now avail- 
able, in quantity, for your use. With- 
out imprint they are free, upon re- 
quest. Ask for Stuffer No. 42. With 
imprint thev are $2 per thousand. 

Order direct from Eastman Kodak 
Company, Rochester, N. Y. 



Finishing customers are good for 
three calls, three sales, and three 
profits. They're valuable things to 
have around. 



One of our dealers has increased 
his Kodak Film business almost 100 
per cent by applying a little psy- 
chology to his selling. When a cus- 
tomer comes in and says, "I want 
some film," this merchant grabs up 
two cartons, lays them down on the 
coiuiter, and asks with a smile, "Will 
two be enough " It is hard for the 
customer to refuse, and few of them 
do. Why not try this out in your 
own store 



WHAT SIZE? HOW MUCH 

Are you supplied with the Abridg- 
ed Edition of the Kodak Film Sched- 
ule? This shows the size, number 
and price of the films used in the 
different Eastman cameras. Big in 
information . . . compact in size, 
the schedule is a great convenience at 
the Kodak counter. As many copies 
as you need will be supplied free, up- 
on request. Ask for No. 38 when 
you order. 



Page tiventy-one 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




wee /ijcks ofihe 
d/ock 



and you make a 

cloth-backed print 

with Holiiston 

Photo Cloth! Just 

wet the sheet of 

cloth, place it on the 

print, squeegee in 

the usual way — and 

the job is done. 

Holiiston Photo Cloth 
is self-adhesive (but 
not gummed) and comes 
in standard sheet sizes, 
packed in handy car- 
tons. No cutting, no 
pasting, no waste. Write 
for samples. 



HIRSCH & KAYE 
Will Supply You 



When it's 



P. D. Q. 



This article originally appeared in 
a manitfocturer's publication. What is 
true of a factory branch, also applies 
to a stock house. 

Here is a suggestion which will be 
worth remembering when you next 
need paper in a hurry. 

In Enlarging Paper 8x10 and 
11x14 are standard sizes on which 
you can always depend being in stock. 
While we endeavor to carry all sizes 
for which a steady demand exists, it 
is nevertheless impossible for us to 
have at all times a complete assort- 
ment of all the sizes listed. Most 
sizes smaller than 8x10 and 11x14 
can be conveniently cut from those 
sizes. Therefore, if you are in a 
hurry, it is safest to order one or the 
other of the two standard sizes — 
8x10 or 11x14 — and cut therefrom 
the exact size required. 

For sizes larger than 11x14, rolls 
are carried in a sufficiently wide as- 
sortment of widths and lengths to 
suit almost any emergency which }'ou 
may encounter. 

We are always glad to furnish any 
size of enlarging paper you may re- 
quire, but in the case of a hurry up 
requirement, the foregoing suggestion 
may often save you unavoidable de- 
lays. 



The Front Page 

The lad on the front page of this 
issue is Ralph Logan Schneider, 
whose father is of the Logan Studio 
in Stockton. Ralph is five years old 
and shares his dad's interest in a\ia- 
tion. 



Page tiventy-tivo 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

Pako Double Duty Dryer 

Pako's Latest Achievement 

Construction and Operation 

1. SPECIAL FEATURES: The drum which has been manufac- 
tured from carefully selected materials is nearly surrounded 
with a traveling- fabric net, operating- in guideways preventing 
sidewise shifting. A rapidly revolving fan is mounted at the back 
of the dryer blowing a constant stream of air at high velocity 
directly against the prints which are held between the open work 
net and the surface of the drying drum. The rapid evaporation 
of moisture caused by this current of air is responsible for the 
large capacity of the Double Duty Dryer. This air current is 
also responsible for the remarkable results obtained when drying- 
dull surface and semi-matte prints, enabling one to dry these 
surfaces speedily without changing print tones. 

2. DURABILITY: The Double Duty Dryer is particularly free 
from mechanical intricacies and so designed and constructed as 
to insure consistant service under constant usage without com- 
plicated and expensive repairs. All the bearings which are sub- 
ject to heating from the drum are equipped with ball bearings. 

3. VARIABLE SPEED : This is a novel and very useful feature. 
By means of a lever conveniently located, the speed of the drum 
rotation may be instantly changed from three minute to six min- 
ute drying. There are five different steps in this speed scale so' 
that the drum speed is instantly adjustable to any desired rate. 

4. VARIABLE HEAT: The Dryer heats up ready for operation in 
approximately one minute and is equipped with a specially con- 
structed heat indicator which shows the working temperature of 
the drum. An automatic thermostat conveniently located at 
the operator's right hand insures a unifonn temperature. 

5. HEAT RADIATION: The heating unit of the Double Duty 
Dryer is enclosed in such a manner that practically all the heat 
is used on the drying surface of the revolving drum and very 
little heat is radiated into the workroom. 

6. CAPACITY : The capacity of the Double Duty Dryer is remark- 
ably large for a machine of such small dimensions. Its maximum 
capacity is in excess of 2,000 average photo finishing prints per 
hour. 

7. METHOD OF OPERATION: Dull or semi-matte prints are laid 
face upward and are dried with a remarkable freedom from 
cockled edges and without changing either the color or the half- 
tone in the least. 

Glazing is done through the PAKO patented process of immers- 
ing the prints in a glazing solution, then laying the prints face 
downward on the feeder which brings them in contact with the 
highly polished drying drum thereby giving them a glaze much 

(Continued on Page 27) 



Page tiuenty-three 



{ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



Now Also Supplied ix the 3x4 Size- 




The Modernist 

(Lava Stone Stock) 

It is just the style needed in these days to create business 
from the young folks and the young old folks. 



Sizes . 
Prices 
Colors 



3x4 3x41/:) and 4x6 

$9.00 $10.50 and $12.50 per 100 

Greytone and Neutraltone 



An ideal school mounter. 



S(i/iip/cs of both colors for 15 cents. 
1 oil arc "missing something" if if sou 
are not featuring this popular style. 

SAMPLE OFFER F-94 



Tapprel^ Loomis & Co. 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



Page tiventy-four 



£ THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 




"JERRIJ 


'S" 


CORNER 


By HimSELF 





The theme song for this page is — 
The Yanks are coming, because I 
went to see a dentist. 



I waited in the room outside, look- 
ing over the joke books from 1928. 
There was an old lady, about 35, 
waiting ahead of me, and a tough 
looking guy. 



After a while the doc came out 
and said, who was first the hen or 
the yegg. 



The dentist put a gold filling in 
my tooth just like he did before, but 
charged me $2.50 more. He said it 
was because the freight rate on gold 
went up. 



He's some guy, that dentist. Al- 
ways trys to be cheerful, even if he 
is looking down in the mouth. 



He's a specialist, he is — and I'll 
tell you why. 



He's the only fellow I know who 
can tell a woman to open and shut 
her mouth, and get away with it. 



While he was working on me he 
said, Have you had your tonsils out, 
and I says No, I didn't know I could 
take them out. 



Then he saj^s, You better watch 
your teeth so when you get old you 
won't have Pullman teeth. How's 



that, I says, and he says. Lowers all 
gone, only uppers left. 



No foolin,' he's a selfmade man, 
that dentist. He started out as a 
chiropodist and he wants to be a brain 
specialist. 



He told me about a man ahead of 
me who asked for gas and then said. 
You better check the oil, too. 



There's all kinds of specialists 
these days. 



Did you hear about the specialist 
in efficiency? He put unbreakable 
glass in the fire alarm boxes. 



My barber trys to be a specialist, 
too. I went in and told him I wanted 
a hair cut and he said which one. 



A man got a ticket for driving past 
a cop's signal. He told the judge he 
(the man, I mean) was deaf, so the 
judge says that's all right, you'll get 
vour hearing in the morning. 



Know what a specialist is? Its a 
man what knows more and more and 
more about less and less and less till 
he knows all about nothing. 

From now on, I'm gonna be a spe- 
cialist, too. 

And I'll tell you why. 

I'm gonna pay special attention to 
other fellers' girls. 

Jerry. 



Page tiventy-fi've 




INDIATONE 

^ ^ ^ ^ A desirable new paper that offers unusual 
warmth in both contact and projection printing 



INDIATONE is a new and beautiful paper for 
projection of rich livins warmth. It offers all 
the deef) full gradations of a perfect contact 
print with a potential in warmth exceeding that 
not only of present projection papers^ but 
contact papers as well. 

Such adaptability has not, in the past, been so 
readily obtainable in the faster papers used for 
projection, which have tended to run colder, 
and with the increase in selling large portraits 
from small negatives, this has been a disadvantage. 

The speed of Indiatone is designed to meet 
the requirements of those now using high-power- 
ed projection equipment. It is thus slower than 
Bromide, but many times faster than contact 
portrait papers. It can, however, be used for 
contact work by screening down the light. 

Indiatone is a paper which you will be sure 
to like, but, more important, it is a paper which 
will enable you to sell larger sizes from small 
negatives more effectively, increasing the return 
in dollars on your sittings. 



» » 



AGFA ANSCO CORPORATION, BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Paf/e tiventy-six 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 



Pako Domble Duty Dryer 

(C"()iitiiiut-d Frcini Pa^c 23) 

superior to the usual ferrotyping. This method keeps the drum 
clean and avoids the use of any wiper or scouring device which 
might eventually injure the highly polished surface of the drum. 

8. CLEANLINESS: The Double Duty Dryer is provided with 
hinged lids which close down over the operating part of the ma- 
chine when not in use, thereby keeping the dust of the room out 
of the machine. Open mesh contact apron allows all surplus mat- 
ter to drop off ; no repeating sand particles can be carried around 
the drum. 

9. SHIPPING AND SIZE: The Double Duty Dryer is shipped com- 
pletely assembled and may be uncrated and put into use in a few 
minutes time. The dryer measures 29" wide, 51" long and 48" 
high, ,and weighs approximately 300 pounds. 

PRICE $645.00 

(Convenient terms of course.) 

WRITE FOR DETAILED DESCRIPTION AND ILLUSTRATION 



The Busy Man's Creed 

I believe in the stuff I am handing 
out, in the firm I am working for ; 
and in my ability to get results. I 
believe that honest stuff can be passed 
out to honest men by honest methods. 
I believe in working, not weeping; in 
boosting, not knocking; and in the 
pleasure of my job. I believe that a 
man gets what he goes after, that one 
deed done today is worth two deeds 
tomorrow, and that no man is down 
and out until he has lost faith in him- 
self. I believe in today and the work 
I am doing; in tomorrow and the 
work I hope to do, and in the sure re- 
ward which the future holds. I be- 
lieve in courtesy, in kindness, in gen- 
erosity, in good cheer, in friendship 
and in honest competition. I believe 
there is something doing, somewhere, 
for every man ready to do it. I be- 
lieve I'm ready — Right Now! 

— Elbert Hubbard. 



26 Ounces of Prevention 

It takes only an hour or two to 
put your hangers and clips in spick- 
and-span condition, and it may save 
you countless hours of "remakes" due 
to the use of dirty ones. 

Take 26 ounces of 28 per cent 
acetic acid, to which add enough wa- 
ter to make one gallon. Soak hangers 
and clips in the above solution for one 
hour, and scrub in clear water. 

It's easily worth the time and trou- 
ble. 



BY WAY OF REMINDER 

On a matt surface print, like Iri.s 
C or D, the dark background often 
shows a slight mark, caused by the 
finger nail coming in contact with it. 
The mark is easily removed by blow- 
ing one's breath on it. Blow hard 
and it is gone forever. 



Page tiventy-seven 



i THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

Paper— Canvas — Now Cel- Pako Border Printer 

luloid— All With Uniform ^ , ^ ■ 

„ , . Border prints are becoming as 

Emulsion , , . j i 

popular as glossy prints and users or 

Recenth' we announced Velour PAKO Printers will be interested in 

Black Canvas, a real canvas base with the annuoncement of border masks 

Velour Black emulsion. Now we an- and holders to fit standard PAKO 

nounce IVORA, a white matt cellu- Printers. 

loid, also coated with Velour Black PAKO Border Mask Holders are 

emulsion. designed to replace adjustable masks 

Ivora will instantly appeal to the on PAKO Junior and Model B 

miniature maker. The celluloid base Printers and are supplied in complete 

can readily be cut and fitted into your sets of 

frames. And think of this advantage. g Mask Holders. 

The emulsion is a Velour Black 6 Border Masks. 

emulsion, fast enough for projection, 1 Filing Case. 

, r V 1, w Price $38.40 

but not too fast. You have complete 

control of the picture at all times. Separate units can be supplied as 

The developer is that which vou use follows: 

for your Velour Black paper. Filing Case (for 8 holders). ...$3.60 ea. 

^ . . Mask Holders 4.20 " 

Think of what this standardized Border Masks 2.40 " 

process means to you. Prints on pa- Sizes 116-120-122-124-127-130. 

per, canvas or cellulolid handled in Three styles of designs are availa- 

the same manner, with the same solu- ble. 

^'°"^* Method of Using Pako Border Masks 

Ivora may be colored or' toned. q^^^ ^^^^j g j,^-^^^^^. equipped 

Place your order now and show sam- ^.^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^,-^1 p.^print pa- 

ples to your clientel. If your wed- ^^^ ^^^^^ -^^ quantities to supply two 

ding pictures and groups are ordered ^^.-^^^^^^^ ^y^ ,„ggest removing ad- 

in small quantities, instead of doz- -^^^^^^^^ ^^^^]^^ f,om one Model B 

ens, as formerly, make the pictures on ^^-^^^^^.^ ^q^jp ^his printer for print- 

Ivora and charge more. An 8x10 -^^^ j^^^.^^^.^ ^^^^ register the masks of 

print on 11x14 Ivora, border tinted, ^^^ ^^^^^. p^-i.^^^,., ^^ correspond to 

will bring attractive prices to you. ^j^^ "master" printer. This method 

will enable one operator to preprint 

Defender — Ivora , , ^ i >.u * ^^ , k„ 

borders on paper stock that can be 

(Velour Black Emulsion — Safety used on all printers with equal re- 

Film Base). ^^^j^g jj., registration. 

I^ozen Dozen Sample prints, to show border de- 

31/4x41/4 $1.75 5x7 $4.20 . *^. ^ 

4x5 2.05 61/2x81/2 6.75 -^^g"^' ^^''^^ '^^ ^^^'^^ °" ''"i''''^- 

8x10 $10.00 Order your Pako Borders today 

11x14 19.60 f,.^^^^ 

Ivora will be supplied in half-dozen TTTr»c/^TT p ir A VTT' 

packages. HlKhL H & A A I Jii 



Paffe tiuenty-eight 



C THE FOCUS for JUNE, 1930 } 

Bargains for the Photographer 



No. 467-78— Majestic Spotlight, incan- 
descent model. 

Bargain Price $40.00 

No. 450-76— 19-E Parallax Reflector. 
This is a 19-inch reflector that will 
enable you to make an enlarging 
camera out of your view camera. 
Bargain Price $27.50 

No. 449-76— 15-E Parallax Reflector. 
This is a smaller reflector of the 
same general style and large 
enough to cover 8x10 negative. 
Bargain Price $16,50 

No. 448-76—2 8x12x42 Blue Sterling 
Tanks. 

Bargain Price each $12.00 

1 8x12x42 White Sterling Tank. 

Bargain Price $13.00 

These tanks are in good condition. 

No. 394-69 — Northern Magnesium 
Blow Lamp with approximately one 
pound magnesium metal. 
Bargain Price $8,75 

No. 968-17— HaJldorson Giant Flash 
Lamp. 

Bargain Price $19,00 

No. 480-80— 30-inch Halldorson Print 
Washer. 

Bargain Price $16.50 

No._ 913-11 — Northern Twin Arc 
Light. Operates on any 110 volt cir- 
cuit. 

Bargain Price $25.00 

No. 494-81— No. 5 Rex Print Washer 
with extra cage. This washer oper- 
ates by water power and requires 
no motor. 
Bargain Price $7.50 

No. 447-B — Duplex Junior Twin Arc 
Lamp. 

Bargain Price $47.50 

No. 481-80— No. 10 Circuit outfit 

complete. 

Bargain Price $85.00 

No. 473-79— No. 8 Circuit outfit com- 
plete with R. R. lens. 

Bargain Price $90,00 



No. 431-74—5x7 Eastman View Cam- 
era, carrying case and one holder. 
Bargain Price $27,75 

No. 455-83—5x7 Eastman View Cam- 
era with case and holder. Camera in 
excellent condition, but case looks 
soiled. 

Bargain Price $48.00 

3 11x14 Sterling Plate Holders will fit 
Folmer Commercial and Eastman. 
Shopworn only. 

Bargain Price each $3,75 

1 11x14 Universal Plate Holder for 
Premo View and Empire State canv 
eras'. Shopworn. 

Bargain Price $3.00 

1 7x17 Portrait film holder for F. & S. 
Banquet Camera. Shopworn. 
Bargain Price $4.75 

2 7x11 Film holders. Shopworn. 
Bargain Price each $1,75 

2 8x10 Ansco Cut film holders. Shop- 
worn. 

Bargain Price each $1.75 

4 8x10 Korona Plate holders. Used. 
Bargain Price each $1.50 

3 8x10 Eastman film holders. Will fit 
Universal Empire State and Premo 
View Cameras. Shopworn only. 
Bargain Price each $1,50 

12 5x7 Eastman No. 2 film holders. 
Will fit Universal Empire State, 
Premo View Cameras. 
Bargain Price each $1.00 

3 8x10 Eastman film holders. Will fit 
Century Graphic Premo ROC and 
Eastman View Cameras. 

Bargain Price each $2.00 

2 5x8 Eastman No. 2 fillm holders. 
Bargain Price each $1,00 

1 12x20 plate holder for F & S Ban- 
quet Camera. 
Bargain Price $6.00 

6 8x10 Graphic plate holders. 

Bargain Price each $1.75 



Page twenty-nine 



I 



TRY IT 

— two short words show the way 
to learn all about 

Velomr 

Black 

for prints by projection 

Velour Black quality is quickly discovered, 
and convincing; — true reproduction of neg- 
ative scale and beauty of tone ; speed in 
printing and work-room simplicity. 

A legion of Velour Black partisans among 
portrait and pictorial photographers have 
learned its merits in the way we suggest 
to you -- TRY IT. 

A choice of twenty surfaces 



% 



IPEFENDER 



I nFFFMnFR PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY iNC I 



DEFENDER PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY iNC 

' ROCHESTEIL . N .Y. 



t 



Page thirty 





Distinguishing Features 

Two eyes, a nose and a mouth — these are the impor- 
tant distinguishing features — the material from which 
nature manages to produce an infinite variety of faces. 

But when you portray these faces — when you at- 
tempt to show the subtle, individual differences of 
shape and texture and light and shade that mark the 
distinctions of character you must have a material that 
will give you a true record. 

The long scale and even steps of gradation of 
Eastman Portrait Film give you such a record. That's 
why the majority of portrait photographers use East- 
man Portrait Film. 

Eastman Portrait Film, Par Speedy Super 
Speed and Panchromatic 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Page thirty-one 




All You See in Your Negative 

Your sitters know nothing about the quality of 
your negatives but they do see and appreciate the 
quality of your prints. 

That's why you should use a portrait paper 
that is capable of reproducing, in the print, all of 
the quality you see in your negative. 

Vitava will reproduce all of the delicate tones 
of your negative, from highlight to shadow. And 
there is a pleasing surface for practically anv 
effect you may wish to secure. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



& 



T' FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 



Vol t .ME VI 



MAY, 1930 



No. 5 





Ei-Mi'SK OF Till; SuN', Ai'RM, 2S, 10:5S a.m. 
As seen from San Francisco. 



by HIRSCH & KAYE 



nt Avenue, San Francisco 







NDIATONE 

^ ^ # ^ A desirable new paper that offers unusual 
warmth in both contact and projection printing 



I NDIATONE is a new and beautiful paper for 
projection of rich living warmth. It offers all 
the deeip full gradations of a perfect contact 
print with a potential in warmth exceeding that 
not only of present projection papers, but 
contact papers as well. 

Such adaptability has not, in the past, been so 
readily obtainable in the faster papers used for 
projection, which have tended to run colder, 
and with the increase in selling large portraits 
from small negatives, this has been a disadvantage. 

The speed of Indiatone is designed to meet 
the requirements of those now using high-power- 
ed projection equipment. It is thus slower than 
Bromide, but many times faster than contact 
portrait papers. It can, however, be used for 
contact work by screening down the light. 

Indiatone is a paper which you will be sure 
to like, but, more important, it is a paper which 
will enable you to sell larger sizes from small 
negatives more effectively, increasing the return 
in dollars on your sittings. 



» » 



AGFA ANSCO CORPORATION, BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Page two 



T. FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 

by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



MAY, 1930 



No. 5 




IN THE PROFESSION 



WM. CRAKE 

Last month's "little 
biography" took us to 
an island in the South 
Seas. Before we take 
the long journey back 
to the mainland, let us 
"T/,r camera re- call Oil another friend 

/'Idcnl the 

lure of the sea" at Papeete. We would 

like to tell you of the 

several photographers at Papeete, but 

right now, the one we have in mind 

is William Crake. 

He was born in England,, in a lit- 
tle seaport town on the northeast 
coast. His father was a biscuit manu- 
facturer, which is an English way of 
saying that he was a baker on a rather 
large scale. Like most English lads, 
the boy had no desire to follow his 
father's trade, but felt the urge to 
travel, to go somewhere, to sail with 
the numerous ships that went out and 
disappeared beyond the hoizon. 

Now we find him at Papeete, Ta- 
hiti, a gai'den spot if there ever was 
one. A simple box plate camera given 
to him as a gift some years ago had 
been replaced by professional equip- 
ment. The lure of the camera had 
replaced the lure of the sea. 

With his wife and two boys, he 
finds happiness complete there. 



Why I Like Business 

1 like business because it is com- 
petitive. Business keeps books. The 
books are the score cards. Profit is 
the measure of accomplishment, not 
the ideal measure, but the most prac- 
tical that can be devised. 

I like business because it compels 
earnestness. Amateurs and diletantes 
are shoved out. Once in you must 
fight for survival or be carried to the 
sidelines. 

I like business because it requires 
courage. Cowards do not get to first 
base. 

I like business because it demands 
faith. Faith in human nature, faith 
in one's self, faith in one's customers, 
faith in one's employees. 

I like business because it is the es- 
sence of life. Dreams are good, poeti- 
cal fancies are good, but bread must 
be baked today, trains must move 
today, bills must be collected today, 
payrolls met today. Business feeds, 
clothes and houses man. 

I like business because it rewards 
deeds and not words. 

I like business because it does not 
neglect today's task while it is think- 
ing about tomorrow. 

I like business because it under- 
takes to please, not to reform. 

I like business because it is orderly. 
I like business because it is bold in 
enterprise. 

— William Feather. 



Page three 




SURESTICK 

The New Vacuum 
Dispenser 



A White 
Liquid Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready; sticks quickly; 
does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints; will not get stiff when ex- 
posed to air. 

Surestick Never Cracks Loose 

whether slip under, comer mounts, parchment or tipped-on sheets. For gluing 
prints in albums, sealing backs of picture frames, plaque work — any place a 
high grade adhesive is required it is far superior. Only small amount required. 
A trial will convince you Surestick IS RIGHT. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint 55c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars — Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 



Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Stop Waste — Reduce 



LABOR & 
EXPENSE 

bisstall 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFITS 

for Amateur Finishing, Commercial & Professional 
Work. Low Cost. Low Upkeep. Best Results. 
Made of the very finest porcelain enamel. 

STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



Re sure you 

see 
STERLING 
on every tank 



TURNS 
OUT 

Enormous 

Amount 

Work 

Daily. 




ALBO 

gets all the silver from your 

Hypo Solution 

THE IDEAL PRECIPITANT 

— Clean, odorless, speedy, 

complete recovery 

$3.00 for 5 Lb. Can 
Full directions enclosed 

PREP.VRKI) B^■ 

Wildberg Bros. Smelting 
& Refining- Co. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

^^'^ho will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price 

nisiRiRLTKn R^' 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



Page four 



t THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 




Tlhiegs Youi Slhoeld 

ABOUT COPYING 



The Copy Board 

Just exactly what form this part of 
the outfit should take depends on the 
provision one wants to make for vari- 
ous descriptions of original. If there 
are likely to be only drawings, etc., 
which can be pinned up, nothing more 
and nothing better is needed than a 
plain flat board to which soft linole- 
um has been glued. A very suitable 
description of material passes by the 
name of "cork linoleum." The board 
should be, say 20x24 inches — few will 
require it larger — and is attached by 
a couple of stout right-angle brackets 
to a base measuring, say 16x8x1 inch, 
and fitted on its under side with a 
guide fillet in the manner of the 
board for the support of the camera, 
already described. It can thus be 
moved back and forth parallel with 
the plate, a movement which is some- 
times convenient, as it saves stretch- 
ing over the rear of the stand in cases 
when the camera has to be pushed up 
fairlv close to the easel. 
The Light 

Since the illumination of the origi- 
nal is more than half the battle in 
copying, the question of the light to 
use and how to use it must be care- 
fully considered. Successful copies 
can be made by daylight and by arti- 
ficial light, but where there is choice, 
there can be no doubt but that arti- 
ficial light is to be preferred, as more 
constant and uniform and more easily 
controlled than daylight. Moreover, 
for most classes of originals, in order 
to avoid the grain or irregularity of 
their surface texture, it is required 



to light them from directly in front, 
so that the whole of the original is 
evenly flooded with light, without cast 
shadows from either side. If this is 
not possible, then the lighting should 
be equal from both sides of the board 
hohling the original. 

Avoiding Grain 

Copies of prints on rough-surfaced 
or unglazed papers, and even of burn- 
ished or glossy photographs when sur- 
face worn, will generally exhibit a 
distressing graininess unless care is 
taken to overcome this difficulty in the 
copying. The trouble arises from the 
irregularity of the surface of such 
originals, not always visible to the eye, 
but much exaggerated in the copy by 
one-sided lighting, under-exposure 
and forced development. 

The remedy is to light such origi- 
nals from directly in front or, if this 
is not convenient, by an equal volume 
of light from either side reaching the 
original at an angle of about 45 de- 
grees from the right and left sides of 
the easel. Or the space between the 
camera and original may be covered 
with thin white tissue paper so that 
the light reaching the original is thor- 
oughly diffused. If artificial light is 
available, the best method is to set 
a vertical board of ample size, sup- 
ported on a light frame stand, be- 
tween camera and easel at a conveni- 
ent working distance froni the easel. 
This board should have a central cir- 
cular opening, surrounded on the side 
facing the original, by a square or 
circular frame carrying four or more 
electric blubs, the camera being op- 
erated from the other side of the 
board. 



Page five 



[ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



The Same Results 



One of the 
"Physically and 
Chemically 
Perfected Photo 
Chemicals" 
by 




Today 
Next Week 
Next Year 



Always 

Free 

Running 




Keeps indefinitely without changing in 
strength because it is 

MONOHYDKATED . 

The only stable kind of Sodium Carbonate having- 
a fixed strength for a given v^eight. 
Your formulas require a definite amount of alkali 
for proper contrast, tone values and uniform speed 
of development. Only the use of Monohydrated 
Sodium Carbonate can give you this assurance. 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since 1867 

ST. LOUIS MONTREAL PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



Page six 



PINCHING PENNIES. There are times when readers write to us 
and ask why we do not devote space to articles about home-made 
accessories and equipment. It has been an invariable rule of ours 
never to publish material of this sort, and we are still of the same 
mind. We have visited many studios which use home-made equip- 
ment, and almost invariably it gives the studio a down-at-heel ap- 
pearance which does not reflect creditably on the establishment. 
Also, while a photographer may be able to save a few dollars by 
building things himself, he forgets to reckon the time that is ex- 
pended and that he could use this more profitably in thinking about 
his business and how it could be improved. The average photog- 
rapher is too prone to waste time doing things of little value, when 
he ought to be sitting back and planning for the future. Home-made 
makeshifts rarely save any money, either in their initial construc- 
tion or in their use, and another point to consider is that they have 
no inventory value whatever should the time come when the studio 
has to be offered for sale. Also, and this of course refers principally 
to lighting apparatus, they add greatly to the danger of fire and thus 
result in increased insurance rates. It is better to buy apparatus 
that is made by manufacturers who know the photographer's prob- 
lems, and nowadays, when almost anything which involves any large 
sum of money can be bought on time payments, there is little or no 
excuse for a studio to be equipped with anything but the best. For 
the man who must economize, the second-hand market is always 
available, and bargains are constantly being advertised either direct 
by studios which are changing to other equipment, or by firms which 
deal in such goods and have a reputation for being reliable. 

Cheapness is always expensive- To do without a needed lens 
because one feels that one is enough is as big a mistake as buying 
too generously and tieing up money in unused equipment. To buy 
cheap folders for the sake of saving a few dollars means that the 
photographer cannot get the prices he should for his work. Using 
one or two backgrounds, rather than paying the price for something 
new, until every family in the town can recognize them at a glance 
in the finished photograph, means that sooner or later a competitor 
will start up and take away your business. Spend some money on 
the studio each month. It will pay. 

Abel's Meekly. 

Instructions For Cleaning tuft of cotton moistened with clean 

High-Grade Lenses warm water. Dry the surface with a 

Occasional cleaning is not only ad- P'ece of clean linen cloth, 
visable but necessary when dust, fin- Under no circumstances use abras- 
ger marks or moisture show on the 'ves or any kind of polishing or clean- 
lens surfaces. For this a camel's hair "iS material. 

brush and a clean, soft, linen cloth are Never use acids, alcohol, alcoholine 

desirable. Proceed as follows: or other solvents on the lens surfaces 

Remove dust with camel's hair or on the mount, 
brush. Only in extreme cases should lens 

Breathe on lens surface, and with elements be removed from their metal 

cloth wipe lightly with a circular mounts to clean inner surfaces. When 

movement. replacing same, see that they' fit even- 

If finger or dust marks cannot be ly and firmly in the mount, 
removed rub the surface gently with a If your lens requires more atten- 



Page seven 



{ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 

Forgiiig Ahead 

for almost half a century 
Hammer made emulsions have found 
and are still finding a ready market, 
because — 

It's so easy to select a special brand 
for any picture you are called on to make, 
It's so easy to make better photographs 
than the ones you thought were best. 

"PHOTOGRAPHS tell the story" 



^s2^M^^m 



REQ. trade: mark 



Write fo7 free portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 

159 West 22nd St., Ohio Ave k Miami St. 

New York Cit}- St. Louis 



CHAROAL BLACK 

AN UNUSUAL PAPER /or PROJECTION PRINTING 

Designed for those xvho wish their prints to co/n//uind attention 
and prod II re 7ieiv business 

Grade "A" Thin Parchment— Grade "B" Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 

COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury Vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc hunps. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Page eight 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



HEADS UP! 

A three-act drama, in which tlie 
real hero is mentioned, but not seen. 
(As related by a neighbor to one of 
our employees). 

Characters 

Cjarbage man By Himself 

Aviator By Himself 

Spectator Neighbor 

Act I — Scene I 

Place Ellis St., San Francisco 

(downtown ). 

(larbage man collects refuse, ties 
it into a large sack which he leaves on 
sidewalk as he goes into another build- 
ing. 

Scene H 

Spectator approaches, sees refuse on 
sidewalk, walks to one side. Aviator 
Hies overhead. Spectator looks up to 
find plane, sees something flash in the 
sky. He steps close to building. 

Plunk! Something hits refuse bag 
with a bang. Spectator investigates, 
finds a photographic lens, movnited on 
a lens board. Lens is marked U. S. 
Army. He puts lens in pocket and 
telephones U. S. Air Service at Crissy 
Field. 

Act II 

(At Spectator's Home) 
Soldier calls, identifies lens and 
proves ownership. Explains that lens 
dropped ofT camera at 2(^00 feet above 
downtown section of San Francisco. 
He leaves, with offer of free airplane 
ride as a reward, (and a promise not 
to drop spectator enroutc). 

Act III 

(Crissy Field) 
Lens is inspected, found to be OK, 
except for a dent on front of barrel, 
is put back on camera. 



Summer School at Winona 
Lake 

Each year the summer school at 
Winona Lake becomes a more import- 
ant institution in the National As- 
sociation. Lhider the able direction 
of the men in charge it has proved its 
worth. 

The Directors of the Association 
have approved changes in the plans 
for the coming season, and the plans 
have been worked out as an improve- 
ment on all previous plans. 

The portrait course conducted by 
Will H. Towles will run from July 
28 to August 23 and will be limited 
to 84 members. The tuition fee is $75. 
The commercial course runs from 
June 23 to July 19. The first two 
weeks will be given over to general 
work, the class limited to 50 members, 
the fee $50. The second two weeks 
will be for advanced work, the class 
limited to 50 members and the fee 
$50. 

When members register for both 
general and advanced commercial 
classes the fee is $75. 

The National Council, at its meet- 
ing last October, opened the school 
to outsiders. It is important that 
members of the Association register 
early in order to be assured of places 
in the student body. 

In the course of a year many in- 
quiries come to the Association from 
outsiders who want to know where 
to study photography. These are now 
privileged to enter the Winona 
School. Detailed information can be 
obtained from The Photographers' 
Association of America, 2258 Euclid 
Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Paffe nine 



f THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 

Forging Ahead 

for almost half a century 
Hammer made emulsions have found 
and are still finding a ready market, 
because — 

It's so easy to select a s^Decial brand 
for any picture you are called on to make, 
It's so easy to make better photographs 
than the ones you thought were best. 

"PHOTOGRAPHS tell the story" 



^JMMilLy^ 



RES. TRADE MARK 



Write joi free portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO, 

159 West 22nd St., Ohio Ave & Miami St., 

New York Q\ty St. Louis 



CHAKOAL BLACK 

AN UNUSUAL PAPER /or PROJECTION PRINTING 

Designed for those who wish their prints to coinnuind attention 
and produce 7ieiu business 

Grade "A" Thin Parchment — Grade "B" Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury Fapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc huiips. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small ajiiount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Pa^e eight 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



HEADS UP! 

A three-act tlrania, in which the 
real hero is mentioned, but not seen. 
(As related by a neighbor to one of 
our employees). 

Characters 

Cjarbage man By Himself 

Aviator By Himself 

Spectator Neighbor 

Act I — Scene I 

Place Ellis St., San Francisco 

(downtown ). 
(jarbage man collects refuse, tics 
it into a large sack which he leaves on 
sidewalk as he goes into another build- 
ing. 

ScEXE n 

Spectator approaches, sees refuse on 
sidewalk, walks to one side. Aviator 
flies overhead. Spectator looks up to 
find plane, sees something flash in the 
sky. He steps close to building. 

Plunk! Something hits refuse bag 
with a bang. Spectator in\estigates, 
finds a photographic lens, mounted on 
a lens board. Lens is marked U. S. 
Army. He puts lens in pocket and 
telephones U. S. Air Ser\ice at Crissy 
Field. 

Act II 

(At Spectator's Home) 
Soldier calls, identifies lens and 
proves ownership. Explains that lens 
dropped of{ camera at 2000 feet above 
downtown section of San Francisco. 
He leaves, with offer of free airplane 
ride as a reward, (and a promise not 
to drop spectator cnroutc). 

Act III 

(Crissy Field) 
Lens is inspected, found to be OK, 
except for a dent on front of barrel, 
is put back on camera. 



Summer School at Winona 
Lake 

Each year the summer school at 
Winona Lake becomes a more import- 
ant institution in the National As- 
sociation. Lender the able direction 
of the men in charge it has proved its 
worth. 

The Directors of the Association 
have appro\ed changes in the plans 
for the coming season, and the plans 
have been worked out as an improve- 
ment on all previous plans. 

The portrait course conducted by 
Will H. Towles will run from July 
28 to August 23 and will be limited 
to 84 members. The tuition fee is $75. 
The commercial course runs from 
June 23 to July 19. The first two 
weeks will be given over to general 
work, the class limited to 50 members, 
the fee $50. The second two weeks 
will be for advanced work, the class 
limited to 50 members and the fee 
$50. 

When members register for both 
general and advanced commercial 
classes the fee is $75. 

The National Council, at its meet- 
ing last October, opened the school 
to outsiders. It is important that 
members of the Association register 
early in order to be assured of places 
in the student body. 

In the course of a year many in- 
quiries come to the Association from 
outsiders who want to know where 
to study photography. These are now 
privileged to enter the Winona 
School. Detailed information can be 
obtained from The Photographers' 
Association of America, 2258 Euclid 
Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Paffe nine 



I THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 

For Perfect Pictures 



( Call it >^\ Gan-i)ert) 

Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

K'33 '- Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address DeDt. No. 8 



n. 



1 lie Oevaerl v'oiuipaiiY 
423-439 W. 55th St. 

Chicago, 111. 
4I:J-421 N. state Street 



y ol a\ 



mcriea. Inc. 



New York City 

Toionto, Out. 
••547-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH SC KAYE, 

S.Tn Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Deprjidahle Merchandise Loiv Prices 



{ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photojri'aphic Prints Executed in Oil, 
Water Color, Black and White, Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 4 20 ' - Phone Prospect 476 



SAVE TIME, WORRY, and MONEY 

By having your Quantity Printing done 
by a firm that specializes in 

QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

All sizes up to 11x14 

Minimum 100 from Negative 

Quick Service Work Guaranteed 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 

8« Third St. SAN FRANCISCO 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 

5703 College Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIF. 



PIECE RETOUCHING by ex- 
pert. Many years experience. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Pri- 
ces reasonable. Prompt atten- 
tion given mail orders. Matilda 
S. Ransdel!, 3100 Fulton St., 
San Francisco, Calif. Bayview 
4584. 



DON'T EXPEPJMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

-'91G STEINER STREET 
San Francisco, Calif. 



EVER READY SERVICE 

Photographic prints, Opal or 
Ivorette Miniatures — artistically 
done in real oils or tints — from 
one to quantities. 



Retouching 

Choose from our 
staff of compi'lcni 
rrtouclirrs llir ours 
yon like best to do 
your rrtou< liuKj. 

M.\ii, Orders 




Prompt Attention" 



EVER READY SERVICE 

Phone GRaystonc 7912 128 5 Geary St. 

QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to the Trade 

ALTA STUDIOS, INC. 

1271 Mission St. SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone MArket 9581 



Pat/r elci'rn 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Now a... 

Beach Multi- Focal 
Lens 

In a Type to Suit your Style 




Some photographers prefer a lens that produces a soft effect in portraiture 
— for them the Series A Beach Multi-focal lens is without a peer. Where 
sharper effects are desired in portrait work, commercial, home portraiture, en- 
larging and cop^ang the Series B Beach ^Vlulti-focal lens stands ready to ac- 
complish every wish. 

Both the Series A and B Beach Multi-focal lenses at largest diaphram 
aperture produce an unrivaled quality of flesh textures that reduce retouching 
to a minimum. 



What Photographers Say About 
Their Beach Multi-Focal Lenses 



"It is decidedl}' refreshing to -work \vith 
such a lens. The improvement in our 
work was immediate and very marked." 
— Fred L. Roy, Petcrhoro, Ont., Canada. 



"I have noticed conclusively the cor- 
rectness of drawing in the middle and ex- 
treme distances of the background." — 
./. Anihony Bill, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



"It gives me the depth I have always 
Avanted. A true drawing, a beautiful soft- 
iiess and it reduces retouching. Negatives 
can be carried deep without blocking." — 
Georcje C. McLean, Knoxvillc, Tenn. 



"Your lens gives the softness that re- 
quires very little retouching and gives flesh 
values unlike any I have seen in another 
lens.'' — Earl Rurnrll, Prnn Tan, A'. Y. 



Equip yourself with the modern 
lens — Obtain one o?i trial today. 

WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

872 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. 

Manufacturers of quality photographic 
lenses and shutters since 1899 



Page ivjelve 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



500,000 New Photographers! 



Each and every child in the U. S. 
and Canada whose twelfth birthday 
comes this year is eligible to march 
into a corner drugstore or a Kodak 
Shop with its parent on ur after May 
1 and demand to be given, free, one 
special Model C "Hawk-Eye" box 
camera and film-roll to match, made 
by Eastman Kodak Company of 
Rochester, N. Y. The Hawk-Eye is 
sold to persons over or under twelve 
this year for $1.25. If all the twelve- 
year-olds are honest and do not go 
from store to store to get more than 
one free camera each, there will be 
more than 500,000 young picture- 
takers at large on the continent bv 
the end of the year, all equipped with 
special gilt Hawk-Eyes. 

Occasion for this expansive gesture 
is the 50th anniversary of George 
Eastman's entry into the camera busi- 
ness. It will be "a token of apprecia- 
tion to (those) . . . who have play- 
ed so important a part." Also says 
the Eastman announcement, it will be 
"a means of interesting hundreds of 
thousands more children in picture 
taking." In other words, Mr. East- 
man's celebration will by no means be 
a purely sentimental one. Film-rolls 
for the $1.25 Hawk-Eye cost 25c, 
developing and printing six Hawk- 
Eye snapshots costs about 40c. 

For Kodak's* golden jubilee \lr. 
Eastman obtained the same sort of 



ungrudged, well-deserved publicity as 
his friend Thomas Alva Edison had 
received for the golden jubilee of the 
electric light bulb. Hearst Colyumist 
Arthur Brisbane wrote: "Ruskin, 
who had worked to reproduce . . . 
(the) architecture in Venice . . . 
hailed the discovery of photography 
as a most important gift to educa- 
tion." Grace Goodhue Coolidge an- 
nounced : "Instead of coming together 
to play games and eat ice cream and 
cake . . . each guest [at the Eastman 
birthday party] is to receive a golden 
anniversary camera and film by means 
of which he will be able to satisfy and 
develop his appreciation of the beauti- 
ful things of nature. . . ." (Time.) 

Here is business, new business that 
means much to you. The original 
half million rolls of film will require 
frequent replacement. Think of the 
sale of film, finishing, enlarging and 
framing that will be added to the 
normal amount. Help these young- 
sters obtain good results and they will 
keep their cameras busy. 

*The word kodak, coined by George 
Eastman in 1888, is a privately owned, 
registered trade mark. When the word 
first appeared it was used to differentiate 
the compact, portable Eastman camera 
from the bulky "wet plate" photographer's 
outfit. The first Kodak sold for $25, was 
loaded at the factory with 100 exposures. 
When these pictures had been taken it was 
necessary to send the camera back to Roch- 
ester to have the film developed and 
printed, the camera reloaded. 



P. I. P. A. CONVENTION 

(Pacific International Photographers' Association) 

Olympic Hotel, Seattle, Wash. 

August 21-22-23, 1930 

Reserve these days and be there. 
For infonnation, membership, etc., write to 

C. F. RICHARDSON, Sect'y, 
P. O. Box 52, 

Milwaukie, Oregon. 



Page thirteen 



t THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



LISTED at the SERVICE DESK 



Are you lookintj for a Studio Locationf Is your Studio for Sale? Are you seekituj 

competent help? ALL of these problems are answered in these columns. Jf'e 

ha-ve insufficient space to list all the Studios offered for sale, and for the 

same reason are unable to gi've complete descriptions. If interested, 

{let in touch with the Hirsch & Kaye Service Desk. JTe'll be 

delighted to assist you. There is no charge for listing 

your business for sale in The Focus. 



Studios 

Anaheim Box 2247, 

Hollywood Box 2248, 

Jackson Box 2268, 

Los Angeles Box 2211, 

Madera Box 2228, 

Miranda Box 2250, 

Monterey Box 2269, 

Oakland Box 2143, 

Oakland Box 2260, 

Pismo Beach Box 2232, 

Pomona Box 2224, 

Redding Box 2258, 

Ashland Box 2089, 

Baker Box 2087, 

Colville Box 2254, 

Concrete Box 2123, 

Olympia Box 2210, 

McGill Box 2095, 

Salt Lake City Box 2230, 

Ai 

Morenci, Ariz. Box 2255, 



are available in these locations: 

California 

The Focus Richmond ..Box 2226, 

The Focus Salinas Box 2215, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2235, 

The Focus San Francisco ....Box 2251, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2231, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2256, 

The Focus San Jose Box 2222, 

The Focus Santa Cruz Box 2249, 

The Focus Santa Paula Box 2164, 

The Focus Selma Box 2243, 

The Focus Taft Box 2267, 

The Focus 

Oregon 

The Focus Bend Box 2209, 

The Focus Freewater Box 2097, 

Washington 

The Focus Snohomish Box 2086, 

The Focus Seattle Box 2137, 

The Focus 

Nevada 

The Focus Reno Box 2125, 

Utah 

The Focus 

izona — New Mexico 

The Focus La Cruces, N.M Bov 2217, 



The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 



The Focus 
The Focus 

The Focus 
The Focus 



The Focus 



Fhe Focus 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Information wanted at SERVICE DESK 

about 

P. Hanlon, formerly, Corning, Calif. 
C. J. Briggs, formerly, San Francisco. 
R. G. McDonald, formerly, Stockton. 
Gustav Davis, formerly, San Francisco. 



H. M. Collett, formerly, Eugene, Ore. 
Gail Wellington, formerly, Reno, Nev. 
P. J. Standar, formerly, Dunsmuir, Calif. 
Mrs. S. Denton, formerly, Oakland, CaHf. 
C. R. Mandeville, formerly, San Francisco 

and Hollywood. 
Arthur Howell, formerly, Eureka. 



Page fourteen 



C THE FOCUS 

Were Worrying About 
Prices Away Back 

in 1885 

Speaking at the convention of the 
P. A. of A. in 1885, G. L. Hurd said : 
"The great essentials of portraiture 
— ^the study of the subjects, the light- 
ing, the posing, the subordination of 
subordinate things, and general har- 
mony of the whole — are matters that 
not one in a thousand reflect, for a 
moment, belong at all to the produc- 
tion of photographs : and yet there 
are men now listening to me who give 
this \alue to their sittings with little 
reward, I am afraid, either of appre- 
ciation or money. 

"It is told of a man who had his 
portrait painted by an artist of dis- 
tinction, that, being no judge of art 
himself, he bethought him of a friend, 
a house-painter, who surely ought to 
know, if anybody. The critic scanned 
the portrait and finally said : 

" 'So you paid that man $150, did 
\'ou ? I assure you there isn't 20 shil- 
lings worth of paint on the whole can- 
vas.' 

"This is the whole thing in a nut 
shell : Are we selling the stock that 
enters into our productions or is it 
our skill that we are offering the pub- 
lic? In the craze of cheap picture- 
making that is upon us it would seem 
to be the former. 

"]VIake a charge for your services 
that would be made by any profes- 
sional man in good repute for the 
same outlay of time. The ability and 
training required to make one compe- 
tent for such work is not a whit less 
than that required for any profes- 
sional pursuit. We pay a lawyer $50 
or $500, according to the importance 
of the case, for an opinion. We know 
that we are paying for skill, for spe- 
cial attainments. The public will pay 
for the exercise of great talents and 
skill in the landscape painter and the 



for MAY, 1930 } 

From Order Desk To Ship- 
ping Room In 30 Seconds ! 

This is not a promise for every 
order, but is an event that happens 
numerous times each day. The orders 
received by telephone or mail are en- 
tered by the order department on the 
second floor and are sent to the upper 
floors to be filled from stock on these 
floors or in the warehouse. Order for 
mountings, envelopes, frames and cer- 
tain other sundries are filled on the 
fifth floor, (although certain frames 
may be stored on the sixth). Paper, 
film, some chemicals and sundries are 
on the fourth floor, while hypo, ap- 
paratus and reserve stocks are brought 
or shipped from the warehouse, about 
a block away. 

Your average order will require at- 
tention from both floors, so the order 
is sent to the fifth floor to be filled 
as much as possible, and then sent by 
chute to the fourth floor to be com- 
pleted. From the fourth floor, the 
order is sent to the shipping room in 
basement, by automatic elevator. Rush 
orders are individually sent down by 
a direct line smaller elevator. 

Recently, by installing a Lamson 
Air Line conveyor, orders are sent to 
the stock rooms the moment they are 
copied. The carrier must be returned 
to the ofl'ice the instant it is emptied, 
which gives the office a check on the 
speed with which the orders are re- 
ceived for attention. You will readily 
see that 30 seconds from order desk 
to shipping room is not impossible, is 
not necessai'ily unusual, and is likely 
to happen to your order. 

portrait painter. 

"I venture the prophecv that in the 
future — perhaps not far distant, either 
— there will be photographic portraits 
hanging upon the walls of afl^uent 
homes where taste and culture prevail, 
which will not be spoken of as 'only 
a photograph' but will be praised." 



Page fifteen 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 




S. E. Langhart of Healdsburg, 
Cal., recently suffered painful injuries 
to his hands. For several weeks, he 
was unable to use his hands, but we 
are glad to report complete recovery. 

Mr. Oslo of the Oaks Studio, 
Oakdale, Cal., recently submitted to 
a sinus operation which he withstood 
quite well. We are happy to report 
his recoverv. 

The front of the Berkeley Com- 
mercial Photo Company, has been re- 
modeled and is now a most modern 
and attractive landmark. Mr. Blew- 
ITT, the owner, has previously shown 
his modern ideas by the equipriient he 
has installed . 

James Donnelly has found it ne- 
cessary to move to larger quarters in 
Santa Barbara. His new address — 
130 E. Victoria Street, gives him a 
ground floor location. 

A photographer in Reno, Nevada, 
tells us of one order he just delivered. 
The amount was $622 which sets a 
rather high record. How close can 
vou come to it? Let's have the facts. 
-^ 

Robert Tipton, formerly with 

the Austin Studio in San Francisco, 
has opened his own studio in Sacra- 
mento. The address is 1026 Twelfth 
Street and from what we have seen 
of his work, he is sure to succeed. 



A new, non-stop flying record was 
hung up at the ocean beach, San Fran- 
cisco, by L. N. Wallace. Mr. Wal- 
lace is in charge of the Whitney 
Studio at the beach in which capacity 
he climbed to the top of a stepladder 
in the studio, to hang a picture. The 
work completed, he continued in a 
forward direction, to return to terra 
firma which he did with more speed 
than dignity. On the way down, he 
caught hold of a portable skylight 
and everything within reach, all of 
which reached the ground right after 
him. As he was underneath, no prop- 
erty damage was reported, and after 
listening to the birdies about ten min- 
utes, Mr. Wallace crawled out, re- 
stored order and resumed charge of 
the studio. 

The opening of the La Perla 
Studio in Pittsburg was quite an 
event. A musical program was fur- 
nished and there were numerous floral 
pieces, sent by local business firms, 
newspaper, and Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

That's letting the town know 
"there's a photographer in vour town." 
The idea is not copyrighted and any- 
thing that means publicity is both jus- 
tified and desirable. Try it \\hen >'ou 
move. 



Pa(/e sixteen 



{ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Nathan Reiman of Stockton tells 
us that the new Pako Film Machine 
is "Clear stuff." Too bad that it 
hasn't been available to the trade 
sooner, he adds. This machine, you 
know, carries the film through the 
developing, rinse, fixing and wash 
tanks and delivers them dry, as a 
popular bakery would express it, "un- 
touched by human hands." 

Mr. and Mrs. Reiman speak very 
highly of the efficient installation by 
Pako and particularly of the young 
mechanic who did the work. In 
humorous vein they tell us of a 
telegram that arrived suddenly one 
day from IVIinneapolis for this young 
lad announcing the arrival in the 
family of a bouncing baby boy. The 
shock caused the young Swede to 
sway alarmingly on his 12-foot ladder. 
Expressions of surprise, disappoint- 
ment and finally resignation passed 
over his face. And then he smiled 
and said, "Just what we ordered and 
right on time." That's the Pako 
spirit for vou. 

The camera with an ink bottle lens 
which played such an important part 
recently in the recovery of the fam- 
ous Stanford Axe is the property of 
Paul Hansen of the Camera Shop, 
Palo Alto. Through the courtesy of 
]VIr. Hansen we were enabled to dis- 
play the camera in the Hirsch & 
Kaye windows where it attracted 
hundreds of people from all portions 
of the Bay district. Efforts are now 
being made to secure the camera from 
Mr. Hansen for the Stanford IVIu- 
seuni. 

^< 

What is said to be one of the most 

elaborately furnished and completely 
equipped studios in California was 
opened April 1st at Wilshire and 
Hauser Boulevards, Los Angeles. It 
is known as the Sturgis Fashion Stu- 
dio. 



We hear often of "Gold Mines" in 
business, a figurative way of express- 
ing that someone is making money in 
a big way. W. G. Bendore of Wil- 
litts, popular photographer of that 
:ity, has a real mine that isn't a figure 
of speech. He expects soon to strike 
pay dirt on a large scale. Word 
comes from him today that he is sink- 
ing an additional shaft on the claim 
and that other improvements are un- 
der wav. 

The mine is in the Auburn country 
where the spaces are still open, wide 
and rugged. It is of interest to note 
that the fireplace of Mr. Bendore's 
cabin is the handiwork of John IVIar- 
shall who discovered gold at Coloma 
in 1848. 

Henry Sackrider of Marysville 
could aptly use the slogan "We Pho- 
tograph Anything Under the Sun." 
In the interest of natural science, Mr. 
Sackrider has recently completed a 
series of motion and still pictures 
depicting the life of a rattlesnake in 
its native haunts. The rattlesnakes 
were real ones, fangs, poison sacs and 
all. If you like the idea of racking 
your lens board within a foot of a 
coiled rattler, and want to go in for 
this class of photography, we would 
suggest that you receive preliminary 
instructions from Henry Sackrider, 
and as a further friendly tip, you 
might call on your insurance agent 
enroute. 

The Ernest Schoenfield Co. has 
moved from the former IVIarket Street 
location to 232 Powell Street. At 
the same time the Florence Schoen- 
field Portrait Studio moved to the 
same location. The Market Street 
studio was occupied for 22 years, 
but growing business required the 
change. 



Paffe se'venteen 



{ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



n Step with Today s Requirements 





■"- 


^S^^^^^'^Bfc 


i 


1 :^:^ 


\ 


] '' 


Im 


k 


It 

r 








The INTERLUDE 

Modernistic throughout . . . just the style needed in these days to add 
that new mode touch to your display. 

The new stock — Iridescent — both cover and insert — with its glint of 
metal shades looks the part of the ultra modern design, which is finished 
in due color tinting ... an entirely new effect. 

In addition, the easels are so called "oversize," giving full play to the beau- 
tiful stock and design and, incidentally, imparting a greater value look 
to the standard .sized portraits. 



Sizes . . 
Prices . 



3x4 

68.75 



3>/2x5 
$9.75 



4x6 
$12.00 



5x7 
$14.50 per 100 



The smaller sizes especially should go well for school work. They have that 
bright, sophisticated, modern look that appeals to students. 

Become acquainted ivith it. 
Samples of both colors for fifteen 
ce?its. 

SAMPLE OFFER SS-42 



Tapprel^ Loomis & Co. 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



Paffe eighteen 



[ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



i 




" J E R R IJ 


S" 


CORNER 


v>^ HimsELF 





I bought nie a pair of those ice 
cream pants for the summer, but when 
I got home, I found they was too big. 
So I went back to the store and says 
to the man "Can I change these pants 
here?" And he says, "There might be 
some ladies coming by so vou better 
use a dressing room." 



If your customer is a politician, use 
PMC No. 6. That's smooth ami slick. 



If we send you hard paper and vou 
ordered soft, don't complain — roll a 
keg of hypo on it. That will fix it. 



Here's a lot of other things I found 



out. 



That reminded me that I am in 
what you call the awkward age. Too 
old to cry and too young to swear. 

While I was in waiting, a negro 
mammy came in and asked for some 
shoes for her little girl. Black kid? 
says the salesman, and she says Don't 
gev pussonal, just git the shoes. 



Women, like eggs, have to handled 
^■arefully. 



A dry dock is a doctor who won't 
write a prescription. 



Letters are not all alike, because 
they corespond. 



I don't expect to work in the ship- 
ping room much longer. I've been 
studying the business from A to Z, 
and I'll try to get a job in the office as 
co-respondent. 

That means answer all the letters 
and give a lot of good advice. Heres 
some of the things I can tell in my 
letters: 



Never break your bread or roll in 
your soup. 



Day light Savings is not the name 
of a bank. 



A quarter back is not a refund. 
Alae Marsh is not swamp. 



If a man would write in how to 
take oft a lens barrel, I would tell 
him to use a bung starter. 



The English Derby is not a hat. 



Grace Church and Virgim'a Ham 
are not chorus girls. 



When you get a customer who is 
lit up, stop down your lens. 



Kelly Pool is not a swimming tank. 



Always put prize fight pictures on 
PMC xNo. 3. That's the roughest 
paper. 



One squeeze finishes a lemon but 
It only aggrivates my girl. 

Jerry. 



Paffe nineteen 



{ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 




The INGENTO is easily superior to any other 
photo mailer on the market. There is no chance 
of breaking photographs, drawings, sketches or any 
other valuable matter when this mailer is used, as 
they are perfectly preserved by the double corrugated 
board which covers the photograph or drawing both 
front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. 
The various sizes we manufacture are made to take 
all the popular up-to-date mounts in use by the 
leading studios throughout the country. 

The New No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
graphs 8x10 or 7 x 11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



The New INGENTO 
Photo Mailer 

has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gumnried flap, making it pos- 
sible to mail photos to foreign countries 
or send them by first-class mail ^vhen pri- 
vacj' or additional safety is desired. 

Made in the Folloiving 
Popular '^izes 

No. 2 5y2 X 1% 

No. 3 6^x 8>4 

No. 4 7><x 9^ 

*No. 5 8^ X lOy. 

*No. 6 10>4 X 12^ 

*No. 7.-. \2}ixUy2 

*No. 8 10^ X 15 

No. 9 6>4x 9^ 

*No. 10 7>4xll^ 

*No. 11 sy2xny2 

*No. 12 13 xliy 

..No. 14 16 xlOy 



Packed in cartons containing fifty. 



Manufactured b^ BURKE & JAMES, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH 8C KAYE 

SIZES for any need ! PRICES none can meet! Prompt Shipments ! 



Universal Opaque 

A bright red opaque that will not 

crack, nor become sticky. It will 

spread evenly and a single application 

of the brush will cover — can also be 

applied with a pen. Each lot is tested 

for these qualities before shipped to 

us. 

1 oz. jars $ .2.') 

4 oz. cans .60 

8 oz. cans 1.00 

Order today from Hirsch & Kaye 

and be convinced. 



Velour Black Canvas 

in dozen packages. 

Since our first announcement of 
VELOUR BLACK CANVAS, this 
new material has made a place for 
itself. (3riginally announced in rolls 
44 inches wide, in lengths of 5 feet 
(or multiples of 5 ) , we now announce 
VELOUR BLACK CANVAS in 
cut sheets. 

8x10 per doz $ 3.60 

11x14 per doz 7.20 

16x20 per doz 14.40 

Other sizes in proportion. 

Order today 
from Hirsch & Kaye 



Pa^e tiventy 



C THE FOCUS 

The Kind of Photographer 
a Man Likes 

When a man is, after much urging 
by his family, lodge, or local news- 
paper, finally persuaded to go to a 
photographer and have his photograph 
made, the impression he gains on his 
initial visit is the determining factor 
in his decision to return himself or 
send his friends to be photographed. 

A man likes, above all, a photog- 
rapher who turns out good work, and 
if the work is not good, anything else 
you might do to please him is lost. 
He likes a photographer who makes 
him look his best, for every man is a 
tiny bit vain at heart, but he wants 
his picture to look natural. 

He likes a photographer who does- 
n't keep him waiting — one who knows 
that he is busy and respects the fact 
that he has a definite appointment 
with him, and proceeds to keep it by 
taking his picture right away. He 
likes a photographer who doesn't 
waste a lot of time on preliminaries, 
knows what he is doing and does it 
in a thoroughly business-like manner. 

If a man must have his picture 
taken, he wants it taken painlessly, 
and with results that justify the ef- 
fort he put forth in going to the 
studio. 

Low-Grade Competition 
An Advantage 

Uninspired competition is always 
better than no competition. 

A finely cut diamond shines the 
more brilliantly when placed in a 
group of cheap stones. 

Business men are sometimes dis- 
mayed at competition. 

The only competition any one needs 
to fear is that which is superior. 

Low-grade competition is a positive 
advantage because it teaches the buyer 
to appreciate the article of quality and 
the service of the established company. 



for MAY, 1930 } 

Suppose They Had Played 
The Star Spangled Banner? 

An item of photographic interest re- 
cently appeared in a St. Louis news- 
paper. A photographer who offered 
pictures at 75c each thought he would 
increase his sales by supplying a girl, 
who for an additional 75c, would sit 
on a man's lap and put her arms 
aroiuid him. 

It worked, till a soldier fell for the 
idea. When he paid for the picture, 
he forgot the extra 75c and refused to 
pay. An argument led to a fight, and 
when the photographer had the soldier 
arrested, the "army" was again vic- 
torious because the judge released the 
soldier and fined the photograher $100 
for disturbing the peace. 



Our New Catalog 

The 13th edition of Hirsch & Kaye 
Catalog is now in press. It should be 
in your possession in a few weeks. It 
will be the most complete we have 
published and will feature the latest 
appliances and material. Several hun- 
dred illustrations will help you visual- 
ize the numerous items displayed. 

The catalog was in preparation for 
se\eral months, and frequently, just 
when we thought we had the forms 
completed, news of new equipment 
would reach us, and copy was rewrit- 
ten. 

A copy will be mailed to every 
"Focus" reader. 



^■ 



The causes of paper blisters are the 
unnecessary creasing or buckling of 
paper in the baths, or in washing 
later. Old fixing baths, plain fixing 
baths, lack of hardener, arc all con- 
tributing causes. 

^ 

Paffe tiuenty-one 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 




Edges! 



"VTO one is impressed 
^ with a collection 
of prints having frowsy, 
frayed edges. Use Hol- 
liston Photo Cloth for 
making cloth-backed 
prints. Unlike ordinary 
muslin and inferior imi- 
tations Holliston posi- 
tively will not fray or 
ravel. 

Seven standard sheet 
sizes, packed in handy 
cartons. Every box un- 
conditionally guaran- 
teed to give satisfaction, 



W^ rite for 
samples 




We Won't Sell Much At This 

Rate (But It Speaks Well 

For The Paint) 

A few days ago, a Air. Lundy canu- 
iiito the store and inquired if we still 
supplied Probiis Paint. Assured that 
Ave did, he placed his order and nien- 
l;n!ied that just 16 years ago he paint- 
ed some wooden trays with Probus 
and now wished to apply another coat. 

Now we ask you frankly — How can 
a stock house prosper if an application 
of Probus Paint will last 16 years? 
Fortunately, there must be many 
wooden trays, sinks, tanks and fixing 
boxes that need repainting, because 
the sale of Probus paint continues to 
show an increase right along. 

How about those sinks of yours? 
Are they in condition to stand an- 
other season of hard usage? Probus 
Paint is supplied in these convenient 
sizes. 

y^ pt $ .45 

1 pt 80 

1 qt 1.25 

lA gal 2.05 

1 gal 3.75 

5 gal 16.75 

Order todav from Hirsch (Sc Ka^e. 



Have You a Little Still In 
Your Town? 

The Eighteenth Amendment does 
some good. A customer writes— "bet- 
ter send me about three 2 ounce bot- 
tles Victor Powder, as we have so 
many distilleries being raided that 
they keep me busy flashlighting the 
booze tanks." 



Yiow is 
powder ? 



}our supph' of flash 



Page livnily-tivo 



M> 



"S^ 



[ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Gimme a film and lend me 
the Kodak! 

Not exactly a collegiate expression, 
but one that is heard frequently at the 
co-operative store of a State teachers 
training college. The store owns a 
camera which can be borrowed by any 
purchaser of a roll of film. 

Romeo's w^w roadster, or Juliet's 
new frock are only a few reasons for 
a snapshot or two. The picture made, 
the film is brought to the store for 
finishing and the camera returned. 

Anybody can use the camera free- 
of-charge between classes or over 
week-ends. The only thing to be 
remembered about this tempting offer 
is the principle of "first come, first 
served." 

Mrs. Marples, the store keeper, 
says that the demand for the "pictur- 
esque paraphernalia" is already pretty 
high. It seems that there's quite a 
fad now to get "shots" taken out on 
the campus. Students are likely to 
stumble upon enterprising young pho- 
tographers at all hours. 

Maybe it's Spring. Then, again, 
it might be IvOve. But, whatever it 
is, the film rolls on. 

You also can create new, profitable 
business. We will supply film at dis- 
count for resale purposes, and we have 
attractive prices on new and used 
cameras. 

May we help you ? 



Eclipse Picture 

The picture on the front cover was 
made from the roof of the Standard 
Oil Huilding, San Francisco, by F. T. 
Hassett. He used 3 x 7 panchromatic 
film, with K 3 filter. Exposure 1/25 
second, stop 32, })y^^ x 4^ Dagor 
Lens. 



Probus Paint Lustre As A 
Color Medium 

Most photographers are familiar 
with the use of Probus Print Lustre 
to clean and brighten prints. Nov.- 
a wtw use has been brought to our 
attention, when Probus Print Lustre 
is recommended as an excellent color 
medium. It is so light in its con- 
sistency that it lends to the print 
which is to be colored, a necessary 
even surface coating which blends 
with the colors, and causes them to 
retain their natural brilliancy. 

Probus Print Lustre can also be 
used as a retouching varnish. 
Price per half-pint can . . . !/i .65 



Coloring Commercial 
Photographs 

By Aven'ir he Heart. Portfolio as 
described, contained in heavy rough 
kraft envelope. Price, $5.00. postpaid. 
Order through Ilirsch & Kaye. 

This is ^^Ir. Le Heart's latest addi- 
tion to his two previous popular 
courses on the coloring of portraits 
and landscajies, and it comes as the 
result of a continued demand for a 
simple, but reliable, course of instruc- 
tion in the coloring of commercial 
photographs. It includes information 
on coloring prints for ferrotyping. 
Like the other courses, it includes 10 
lessons in coloring, 8 8x10 commercial 
photographs, one color harmony chart, 
and a card entitling the purchaser to 
criticism of the work done on the 
eight prints, and also to criticism on 
any additional prints done by the stu- 
dent if the first eight are not sufficient 
to make him or her proficient. This 
course throughout is devoted to work 
with water colors, which are the only 
type of color suitable for ferrotyping. 



Paeje tivcnty-three 



I THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 

NEW PROCESS IMPROVED 

Crystal Dry Mounting Tissue 

Wax Paper Interleaved to Insure Perfection 

An entirely new product of Superior Adhesive Strength, with 
a wide range of temperature latitude. Specially prepared to meet 
the most exacting requirements of the Photographic Profession. 

PACKED IN NEAT CARTONS 

PRICE LIST 









ONE GROSS CARTONS 








4 X 5 " 


$ .45 




6 X 


8 " 


1.30 


11 


X 14 " 


3.40 


4 x6 " 


.60 




61/2 X 


31/2" 


1.35 


14 


X 17 " 


5.10 


414 X6V2" 


.65 




7 X 


9 " 


1.35 


16 


x20" 


6.90 


5x7" 


.85 




7 X 


11 " 


1.70 


18 


X 22" 


8.65 


5 x8 " 


90 




8 X 


10 " 
ROLLS 


1.75 


20 


x24" 


10.20 


10 


yds. X 20" 




$1.15 




50 yds. X 


20" 


$5.65 




10 


yds. X 25" 




1.45 




50 yds. X 


25" 


6.50 




10 


yds. X 30' 




1.75 


REA31S 


50 yds. X 


30" 


7.90 






20 X 


24" 


Full 


$32.00 


Quarter 


$8.50 








25 X 


30" 


Full 


$52.00 


Quarter 


13.75 








30 X 


40" 


Full 


$78.00 


Quarter 


20.50 








JELLITAC adheres permanently un- JELLITAC is well known as a per- 

dcr all climatic conditions, whether hot feet paste for all conditions. A 4-pound 

or cold, dry or wet, and is not affected package makes a gallon of paste, but you 

by sudden changes of temperature. Even can mix it as required, 

when used to hold labels on bottles in an Price $1.25 per 4-lb. package, 

ice chest, \\hich is a severe test, it holds. Trial size (quart) 15c. 

Order Today from HIRSH & KAYE 



Paffe tiuenty-four 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 

Fifty Years of Progress 



Photography 50 years ago, when 
George Eastman entered the business, 
was a cumbersome and tedious pas- 
time. One wishing to go into the 
country for a few snapshots had first 
to procure the services of a mule. On 
the mule would be loaded : a tent for 
the preparation of the "wet plates" 
(which were sensitized in the tent and 
put, dripping, into the camera) ; vats 
for the chemical solutions ; a tripod 
which would support a piano box ; a 
camera nearly as large as a piano box ; 
a helper. 

It was when he was a bank clerk 
in Rochester, N. Y., that George 
Eastman started to drive the mule out 
of photography. One day he paid a 
local photographer $5 for a lesson in 
picture-taking. Shortly afterward he 
found in an English magazine an ar- 
ticle on dry photograhic plates which 
obviated the necessity for elaborate 
preparation just before the picture 
was snapped. George Eastman work- 
ed in the evenings at home to develop 
a dry plate (glass covered with a 
sensitized emulsion) of his own. Ac- 
complishing this, he resigned from the 
bank, started in business for himself. 

He decided that a flexible film 
would be better than a rigid, and 
started using paper as a base. Later 
came the cellulose base which is used 
now. This development was probably 
the greatest in photography. 

The Man 
George Eastman, poor as a youth, 
developed an active hate of poverty. 
He now expresses this hate with his 
expensive tastes, which include: big 
game hunting, orchid growing, ex- 
pensive music, fine food. 



On liis African trip, taken with 
Martin Johnson, Mr. Eastman car- 
ried a cooking outfit along for himself. 
Deep in the jungle he would make 
lemon meringue pies, would take time 
out to stir up a chocolate cake, two 
dishes for which he has a classical 
appetite. Once he sent native runners 
loo miles through the bush to invite 
another U.S. party to come and eat pie. 

Popular is the Eastman home with 
Rochester sub-debs. Often they are 
given surprise parties at which a for- 
tune's worth of orchids grown in the 
Eastman green-houses, is distributed. 

Music-loving, George Eastman 
calls himself a "musical moron." To 
remedy this he has an organ recital in 
his home daily at 7 :30 a. m., a con- 
cert each Sunday. To remedy a like 
condition in others he founded the 
,^6,000,000 Eastman School of Music, 
has given Rochester hundreds of free 
concerts. Albert Coates, one-time 
conductor at the Imperial Opera of 
Petrograd, dedicated to Patron East- 
man his Suite after the .Style of the 
Old Masters. 

Thus Mr. Eastman spends his time 
and money. Of the latter he observed : 
"Two courses are open to a man of 
wealth — he can hoard money for his 
heirs — or he can get it into action." 
Having no heirs he has gotten some 
$75,000,000 into action, including 
$25,000,000 to the University of 
Rochester, $15,000,000 to Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 
Last year he embarrassed Prime Min- 
ister Mussolini by presenting Italy 
with a $1,000,000 dental clinic. // 
Duee was embarrassed (and chagrin- 
ed) because it could not be controlled 
by the Italian Government for two 
years. (Time.) 



Page twenty-five 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



USLIN BANNER 



for Photo Finishers Retail Stations 



^^D^vtelfJ^%iti5§ 




I Here/ r l£jj11\J 'em Here 



5 ^^'^^ 



Made in Oil Colors 12 inches wide and 6 feet long 

T 

-L HESE can be attached to the awning of any retail station or put 
inside or outside of the window. They command attention of the 
prospective Photo Fan on the street who has films to be developed. 
These banners are ready for shipment on short notice. 

Numbers 1-2-3-5-6 . . . Red and Black 

Number 4 Red and Green 

Number 7 . . . . All Red - White Lettering 

PRICES 

One to five of each number 
Six to 15 " " ^' ... 

16 to 25 " " " ... 

26 or more " " " ... 

Postage extra 

Send vour orders now to 



$1.00 each 

.85 " 
.70 " 
.60 " 



Order by number. 

MIRSEI ^ EAYE 



Page tiuenty-six 



C THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Window Shade Backgrounds 

Backgrovinds can now be obtained 
painted on material suitable for roll- 
ing. Four designs, woodland scenes, 
are offered in sizes 5x6 and 6x8. 
These backgrounds are supplied com- 
plete with roller and slat and are 
painted in oil color. 

Being a very new item, we have 
no catalogue of the roller shade back- 
grounds, but if you are interested, 
we will submit sample photographs so 
that you can make your selection. 

5x6 ft $10.50 

6x8 ft 16.80 

Plain clouded, 30c per sq. ft. 
Plain backgrounds, 25c per sq. ft. 



Chromium Plates 

This is what a customer in Vallejo 
writes about chromium ferrotype 
plates: 

"I have received and am trying out 
the 18x24 chromium ferrotype plates 
you sent me. It works very satisfac- 
tory. Mr. Bush quoted me a price 
per dozen or more, but I have for- 
gotten just what it was. Please ad- 
vise me by return mail. . . ." 

"Please ship one dozen 18x24 
chromium ferrotype plates, and if 
there is any credit due for this order, 
please give it to your salesman, as he 
told me about them, which I have 
found to be extremely satisfactory." 

Later — "Those chromium ferro- 
type plates are the best ever!" 



Chromium Ferrotype Plates 

18x24 each $ 3.00 

per dozen 32.40 



Barre* Auxiliary Light Out- 
fit (To Be Used With Con- 
denser For Enlarging) 

This is perhaps the most powerful 
lighting outfit to be used in connec- 
tion with condensing lenses for enlarg- 
ing. It consists of a frame on which 
is mounted a Mogul socket for a 1000 
watt T20 lamp, a forked carrier to 
support a single 6-inch condenser and 
a magnifying reflector. 

The light from the Mazda lamp 
is reflected and magnified by the re- 
flector, and at a distance of from one 
to two inches from the lamp, the light 
is caught by the flat side of the 6-inch 
condenser which has a greater sur- 
face. When the reflector is properly 
focused, the 6-inch condenser becomes 
a 6-inch ball of light which is natur- 
ally much more powerful when view- 
ed through the 14-inch condenser 
than the original lamp area. Once 
the adjustments are made, they are 
permanent and the outfit requires no 
further attention. We have been told 
by users that the Barre' Auxiliary 
Light Outfit increases the original 
light by as much as 800 per cent, the 
actual amount depending upon the ac- 
curacy with which the original adjust- 
ments are made. Price complete with 
T20 lamp, $27.50. 



Remember 



GArfield 7370 



Our New 
Telephone 
Number! 



Paffe tiventy-seven 




Courtesy of Hillyer C. Warlick, Macou, Ga^ 



Brilliance with Delicacy 



Brilliance with delicacy, and com- 
plete adaptability to manipulation 
and printing requirements, have en 
abled Agfa Portrait 
Film to brighten many 
a studio work-day. , 




This fine film, so 
responsive to the pho- 
tographer's operating 



PORTRAIT 
FILM 



technique, quite naturally comes 
into more and niore general use. 
For, sooner or later, professional 
judgnient selects the 
best that can be found. 

There's a branch or 
distributor near y o u 
prepared to give good 
service. 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 

Agfa Ansco Limited, 204 King St. East, Toronto, Onf. 
Page t^'cnty-nglit 



[ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Hm— Hm— Aint That 
Sumpthin" 

In the Roto-Cjfravure section of the 
S. F. Chronicle, May 4, there ap- 
peared some excellent pictures of 
America's favorite entertainers, Amos 
n' Andy. The pictures were excellent 
character studies but unfortunately 
the photographer (Bloom, Chicago) 
destroyed our mental picture of the 
office of the Fresh Air Taxicab Co. 
of America, Incorpulated. 

We had the impression the furnish- 
ings consisted of a desk, a chair, a 
telephone and an empty box, but the 
photographer, called on to furnish the 
"props." lost the atmosphere when he 
furnished — an empty hypo keg. No 
mistake, the marks on the keg arc 
altogether too prominent. 

Did you ever hear of Andy or the 
Kingfish sitting on a hypo keg? 
No, never. All of which shows that 
illustrative photography demands mi- 
nute attention to detail and the pho- 
tographer must have a thorough 
understanding of the background of 
his story. 

Fs regustcd. 

Remember this Number. 

GArfield 7370 

Ask for order department, 
HIRSCH & KAYE. 



METAL FRAMES 

A most attractive addition to our 
line of frames is announced. In ad- 
dition to swing and miniature frames 
we now of¥er a new line of Metal 
frames in sizes 3;^x45<4 and 7x9^ 
complete with glass, back and easel. 

We feel so sure the new line will 
be well received, and are so desirous 
that you should see and appreciate 
them that we make a special introduc- 
tory offer. Order a sample line now, 
and if the\' are not just what you 
want, retuiii them for credit. You 
take no risk and enjoy the benefit ol 
personal inspection of the frames. 

That's a fair offer, isn't it? Here 
are the styles: 

#700 3I4X414 in case $3.75 ea.net 

#702 7x9% Black & Gold $5.00 " " 

#721 7x9% Black & Gold $7.50 " " 

#721 7x9% Red & Gold.. ..$7.50 " " 

#728 7x9% Black & Gold $7.75 " " 

#728 7x9% Red & Gold. ...$7.75 " " 

#730 7x9% Black & Gold $7.75 " " 

#732 7x9% Black & Gold $6.75 " " 

Order today from Hirsch & Kaye. 



1930 BARGAIN LIST 

The Bargain Bulletin for 1930 has been mailed. 
If you did not receive yours, write for a copy, because 
we offer bargains in equipment, apparatus and 
material. 



Patjie tiuenty-nine 



[ THE FOCUS for MAY, 1930 } 



Grippit is Different 

in 8 Ways 



Transparent. Grippit is nearly as 
transparent as window glass. 



2 



Non-Wrinkling". Grippit holds even 
the thinnest tissue without a wrinkle. 
Scrap-books and mounted prints need 
never be anything but smooth and 
neat — if you use Grippit' 



Clean. Rub it up into little balls with 
your fingers and see how they clean 
up after themselves like erasers. This 
is the reason why Grippit can be 
spread with even the daintiest fingers 
without soiling them. 



Stainless. Neither where Grippit is 
applied or removed is the slightest 
discoloration appaj'ent. 




Flexible. The fact that Grippit still 
holds with all the tenacity of live rub- 
ber shows that it will not dry out and 
crack off" with age. 



Fragrant. Grippit is blended from 
such pure ingredients that it leaves 
nothing but a clean, fresh odor to the 
finished work . 



7 



Waterproof. Does not soak off". 



8 



Removable. If you really wish to 
take off the print, insert a thin knife 
blade under one comer; then, taking 
that point between thumb and finger, 
slowly and carefully peel it back as 
if it were adhesive plaster! 

Grippit will hold labels on glass jars, tin boxes, wooden cases, or chinaivarc. 

It will hold patches on inner tubes and hot water bottles. . . . In fact, it has 

hundreds of uses wherever Paper, Cloth, Leather, etc., must be attached to 

M'ood, Metal, Stone, or Glass. 

Grippit is More than a Paste 



PER TUBE 

$.25 



PINT CANS 

$1.50 



12 tubes furnished in display carton for resale 
Write for resale prices 

Order Today from Hirsch & Kaye 



Par/r l/iirly 



Qf^''iC/'^^'''^°'''^''''^''''^''''^''"^'^^!^^^**°^^^''^''''=^'''''^''^ 



I*-' ^: 



DEFENDEM FILM 



for correct interpretation of color value 
and contrasts 

Used without color filter and under usual 
artificial light exposure, Defender Panchro- 
matic Film displays notable speed. Its fidelity 
to the color scale is therefore at the service 
of the Commercial Photographer in many 
tasks where ordinary plates or film would 
ordinarily be employed. 

Used with standard filters Defender Panchro- 
matic Film gives the maximum of color re- 
cording value. The Defender Film negative 
is crisp, bi'illiant and beautiful in gradation 
and printing quality. 

"I'/if 'Pan' negative is better." 

Defender Film Defender Film 

Portrait is made expressly for Defender 

Panchromatic by DuPont-Pa'he Film Mfg. Corp. 
Commercial Orlho New York City 



DEFENDElT^ V 



I 
i 
DEFENDER PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY iNC | 

ROCHESTER. N.Y. T 




For prints you will look upon with satisfaction 
and deliver with pride — prints that set the high- 
est photographic standards and are fully appreci- 
ated by your customers, use Vitava. 

Vitava Athena, C and E-smooth are two of 
the most popular, standard surfaces suitable for 
almost any size and style of high grade portrait. 
C is a white stock, E is a light buff. Both have 
a pleasing, smooth matte surface — will retain 
all the quality of your most brilliant negatives. 

You can safely standardize on Vitava Athena. 
There are eighteen pleasing surfaces to choose 
from, at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



^^^s^^^^^s^^k^^M^x^^zM^^r^^zmxm^^'^ 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 



Vol. VI 



DECEMBER, 1930 



No. 12 




f2 



Published by 

HIRSCH &L KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



t^^^^^^m^s^^^^^^ssm^^^^^mi 




Portrait by Leo W. Falls, 
Orlando, Fla. 



an 



a paper 
be too 
good? 



A CHARMING subject that 

' ^ tugs at your heartstrings/ 
a properly adoring parent, a 
thoroughly competent camera 
man with the deftness of a fine 
technician, a good film, — all re- 
sulting in a negative which is 
truly a work of art. And then 
— the choice of paper. 

Can any paper be too good 
for such a job — for any job 
that a photographer wants to 
be known by ? 



Our answer is No — and 
that fine emulsion quality is 
accordingly, at all times, our 
paramount duty to photograph- 
ers in the manufacture of — 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPERS 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



THE FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography by HiRSCH & Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



DECEMBER, 1930 



No. 12 




INTRODUCING— 

H. Lancaster, 
San Francisco. 

When we asked 
Hahneman Lancaster 
why he was a photog- 
rapher, he looked seri- 
ous for a moment and with that char- 
acteristic twinkle in his eyes, he re- 
phed: "Because I like to make people 
look like they think they look." And 
that, you'll agree, is a real job. 

Mr. Lancaster is a native of Can- 
ada, but has spent most of his life in 
this country. His father was a Quaker 
surgeon, and his mother came from 
a family of musicians and artists. As 
a youth he studied medicine and art, 
and his first contact with photography 
was in a professional capacity in a 
studio in London. 

His first studio was opened in 
Omaha, Nebraska, where for four 
years he was president of the Ne- 
braska Photographers' Association. 
His next studio was opened in Mar- 
tinez, California, and while in this 
locality, he made a host of friends 
among Focus readers. He served two 
terms as President of the Northern 
California Photographers' Association 
and will always be remembered for 
his loyalty to that group. 

Onlv recently, he opened a studio 
in San Francisco, having turned over 



the management of the Martinez stu- 
dio to his son, Ernest. 

He finds his happiness among his 
children, all of whom, with one ex- 
ception, live in the Bay region. One 
of his daughters, Mrs. Florence Her- 
zog, frequently sang at meetings of 
the association of which her father 
was President. No wonder, that to us 
who know him intimately, he is not 
Mr. Lancaster, but "Daddy." On 
your next visit to San Francisco, call 
on him at 1109 Market Street. You 
will feel inspired by being in his pres- 
ence. 

Do in (J Things Rujlit 
The man who never made a mistake 
never made a dollar. It isn't the indi- 
vidual blunder that is most costly, 
but the habit. 

The way to correct the habit of 
blundering is to form the habit of 
doing things right. 

But everything we do with our 
hands is directed by the brain. In 
every important work this direction 
is subconscious but none the less real. 

To get off the track of mistakes, 
then, and to travel securely on the 
road of accurate and methodical work, 
think each task out thoroughly and 
correctly. . . . work. 

Everybody knows how to express a 
complaint, but few can utter a grace- 
ful compliment. It's a matter of prac- 
tice. 



+ ] 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 




^ 



Prices Reduced 

The price of Victor Flash Pans, Models 
A and B, has been reduced. The Victor 
Flash Pan is a dependable, safe method 
of using flash powder. Primers that re- 
semble blank cartridges are used to ig- 
nite the powder, and one of several novel 
features is a magazine in the handle of 
the pan, that holds 12 primers. 

Refer to your H & K catalog, page 53, 
and make these corrections: 
Victor Flash Pans 
Style A — 10 inches long with 4-in. pan, $9.50 
Style B — 18 inches long with 4-in. pan, $11.75 

And nou- — have you placed your order? 



^^DlAPHAX'' the new DUPLITIZED 

X-RAY FILM INCREASED SENSITIVITY 
REDUCED EXPOSURE TIME 

A RADICALLY different x-ray film perfected by the Eastman 
Kodak Company is now offered for all general x-ray work. 



Diaphax Features 

Reduces present exposure time 

Retains all desirable features of Con- 
trast emulsion 

May be viewed for interpretation be- 
for ■window or illuminator 

Permits recording of pen or pencil 
notations on the film surface. 

Requires no change from standardized 
processing procedure 

Supplied with Safety or Nitrate base 

Diaphrax Film is supplied at the prices 
HiRSCH & KAYE 



Leading radiologists have en- 
thusiastically endorsed Eastman 
Diaphrax Dupli-Tized X-ray 
Film. They agree that it will 
save time and produce better 
results because it has all the fea- 
tures of the older type Eastman 
Contrast X-ray Film, together 
with greater sensiti\"it}' and new 
ease of viewing. 

now effective for Contrast Film. 
]iave it! 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[S 



-4^ 



Did This Ever Happen 
To You? 

T. Major Edgecomb of Red Bluff 
tells this one on himself. It caused 
us a loud laugh and we are passing 
it on : — 

One evening recently, Mr. Edge- 
comb was given a hurry-up call for 
a night picture of a prominent display 
window in the heart of town. Other 
things had been planned for the even- 
ing, but true to the traditions which 
govern the activities of doctors, pho- 
tographers and fire-departments, he 
heeded the call and stepped forth un- 
der the starry sky and the slight 
breeze — ever so slight — which drifts 
in from j'onder hills of an evening. 

In less time than we can draw^ you 
a picture of it, the camera and tripod 
had been placed in position, and with 
an inward nod indicating approval of 
focus and diaphragm stop, the stage 
was set for the flash. Out comes the 
trusty gun. A critical eye cast toward 
the dark canopy of heaven dictates an 
ample portion of powder. It is given. 
Simultaneously with a flash of fire, a 
shrill cry and a crash of crockery 
rends the air. Out of the adjoining 
restaurant, a stream of people pour. 
"Mt. Lassen!" shrieks a woman as 
she faints in the doorway of the eat- 
ing place. While first aid is being ad- 
ministered, the "hasher" sweeps up an 
armful of broken dishes and Edge- 
comb retreats down an alley, a full 
jump ahead of the camera and tripod. 

Andree Film Good 

Prints Made From Pack in Ice 
Since 1897 

Photographic film which had lain 
in the snow and ice of the Arctic re- 
gions beside the body of Salomon An- 



dree, the explorer, since the winter of 
1897-98, has been developed, reveal- 
ing photographs good enough to be 
reproduced, according to word re- 
ceived from Sweden by the Eastman 
Kodak Co. 

Pictures Wanted 

At various times the editor of The 
Focus has received pictures volun- 
tarily sent in by interested readers of 
The Focus, and we have used the 
pictures on the front page of this pub- 
lication. There must be many unique 
pictures, and perhaps you have a pic- 
ture or two that you consider every 
bit as good as any you have seen on 
the front page. 

Should you have a picture that you 
think will be of interest and will be 
appropriate for Focus use, please 
send it. 

Why a Camera Should Look 
Up, Doicn or Side wise 

While this may seem like a sensa- 
tional statement, it is the name of an 
interesting pamphlet we will gladly 
send on request. Many photographers 
are under the impression that the 
proper function of a view camera is 
to take pictures in the general direc- 
tion in which it is pointed, but mod- 
ern cameras now have adjustments 
previously thought impossible. 

If you are interested in this pam- 
phlet, write for your copy. 

Master switches for both white and 
safe lights are a convenience in the 
darkroom. These switches should be 
placed near the door to be used by 
the last man out. The white light 
should be controlled by a key switch, 
the key being hung on a chain nearby. 



6] 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For sale by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



■^ 



4 POUND SODA SCALE 




Seamless Polished Brass Scoop. Rubber Tipped Fork. 
Hardened steel knife edges, V-shaped center and hanger 
bearings. Iron weight plate. Scale is red enamel. 
This is the best low-priced scale on the market today. 
Price includes iron weights to weigh stated capacity. 

Price %\\S^ 



In Chicago, Chris Longhini, Gogebic man Longhini decided it was a cani- 

(Mich.) trapper and woodsman, re- eraman mistaking him for a gangster. 

membered news-pictures he had seen tt u ^ u j ^u ^u ^j^i,v„ 

, , , . , He charged, smashed the theodolite, 
of gangsters and photographers with 

tripod cameras. Seeing a surveyor Punched the surveyor. In court lu- 

pointing a theodolite his way Woods- paid $400 for the ruined instrument. 



->- 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930} 



[7 



Episode 

[A two-act drama, in which we often 
play a part, as recorded in the "De- 
fender Bulletin."'] 

Photographer: (rushing into stock- 
house) "Say, can ya wire 'n get me a 
gadget for my 'Goliath' printer? Just 
broke the darn thing and machine 
won't work without. Gotta lot of 
work to get out pronto." 

Dealer: (briskly) "Sure, right 
away. But I didn't know you hadda 
'Goliath.' Whereja get it?" 

Photographer: (departing cheerful- 
ly) "From Blanks — he gimme a bet- 
ter price." 

The above little dialogue is entirely 
meaningless . . . Unless you know 
the rest of the dope, which is — that 
"Blanks" is about 400 miles away as 
the crow flies ; that the "Goliath" sells 
for 250 smackers; that the "gadget" 
brings 35 pennies in the open market ; 
that the wire was worth 40 centimes 
in the opinion of Western Union. 

Now you can grasp why the dealer, 
in fifteen minutes between that and 
quitting time, did the following things 
in this order — (1) imperilled his im- 
mortal soul by the profaneness of his 
thoughts; (2) bawled his stenog to a 
fare-ye-well for nothing in particular ; 
(3) increased his blood pressure to an 
alarming extent; (4) hung up on his 
wife who telephoned to know if he'd 
be home early; and (5) told an old 
friend, who dropped in to make a golf 
date, to go to Hell. 

Oh, yes — and wired for the "gad- 
get." 

New Veltura Surfaces 
The two surfaces P and Q added to 
the Veltura list are already in con- 
siderable demand. An attractive com- 
bination — distinctly rough texture 



with a light surface luster. P is buff 
stock, O white, both double weight. 

Ow-ah — 
I\T a certain East Bay studio that we 
could mention by name, the janitor 
service is rendered by one Amos 
Jones, whose side line is that of a 
Sky Pilot. The janitor has rendered 
good service for a number of years, 
and was known to possess a certain 
amount of initiative. 

It was only natural then, that on 
finding a burnt-out electric globe in 
the studio, he proceeded to replace it 
with a good one. He found what he 
thought was a 75-watt lamp, but 
turned out to be one of the new 
Photo Flash bulbs. 

Although this happened several 
da}'s ago, he has not been seen since, 
and from all indications is still going 
strong. 

Ivor a 
Users of Defender Ivora will be in- 
terested to learn that a new variety is 
now offered — 

Buff Ivora 
The Buff is identical in quality with 
the White, both being the Velour 
Black emulsion coated on a flexible, 
easily trimmed Safety Film base. 

Aside from the fact that Ivora may 
be as conveniently trimmed to shape 
as paper, its appeal is based primarily 
on photographic quality. It is the 
positive type of emulsion, the speedy, 
adaptable Velour Black, rich in value, 
beautiful in tone, the latter made 
more brilliant in effect by the semi- 
transparent base. 

A buff tint is often preferred for 
coloring. Buff Ivora has the same 
adaptability of surface for color work 
as the original White. 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 




Omir Salesmen Tell Us 



Whex an out-of-state photographer 
comes to locate in California, that is 
nothing unusual. But when a Califor- 
nia photographer leaves the state to 
establish himself elsewhere, that is 
news. 

This is prompted by a note from 
R. J. Todd, formerly of Oroville, 
who writes that he is opening a new 
studio in Union City, Tenn. 

But some day he'll come back. They 
all do. 

"Jack'' Gum, veteran photogra- 
pher and for the last 15 years Bureau 
Manager for a newsreel branch, died 
October 29. 

Mr. Gum was well known and 
very popular. He is survived by a 
young daughter. 

The Japanese Camera Club, 
with more than 100 members, in both 
amateur and professional fields of 
photography, opened its fall exhibi- 
tion on November 1 at its headquar- 
ters, 1639 Post St. 

This club holds two exhibitions 
each year, and silver cups are award- 
ed for the best photographs submitted. 
The first prize at this exhibit went to 
F. Y. Sato. The exhibition was quite 
diversified in subject interest and the 
attendance was very gratifying. 

Something different in advertising 



was recently done by Clyde Sunder- 
land, Oakland commercial photog- 
rapher. He prepared an attractive 
folder, in the inside of which was an 
aerial view of the down town district 
of Oakland. Beneath the picture ap- 
peared this wording: 

"Oakland, California 
October 15, 1930." 
"This striking aerial photograph of 
Oakland's business district as it is to- 
day, comes to you with the compli- 
ments of the Clyde Sunderland 
Studios. Keep it during the 'Thriv- 
ing Thirties' for comparison with the 
Oakland of October 15, 1940." 

J. D. Goodrich, formerly of The 
Dalles, Oregon, has purchased the 
Kleinhammer Studio at Yreka. Mr. 
Goodrich has had a wealth of ex- 
perience ; with boundless enthusiasm 
and aggressiveness he is bound to go 
a long way in this thriving northern 
town. 

E. Rick of Santa Barbara has 
opened a new studio at 116 North 
Broadway, Santa Maria. Mr. E. E. 
Moore, formerly of Redlands, is 
cameraman. Mr. Rick will continue 
his Santa Barbara activities. 

, In a recent issue of the Berkeley Ga- 
zette, the McCuLLAGH StL'Dio used 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[9 



H- 



one-third of the page with an interest- 
ing notice. The article was illustrated 
by a reproduction of the first photo- 
graph ever taken. After an explana- 
tion that Miss Draper, the subject, 
powdered her face and sat in the sun 
for six minutes while her brother op- 
erated the camera and made the pic- 
ture, the article mentioned the ease 
with which modern pictures can be 
made. The advertisement ended 
with a suggestion for a photographic 
Christmas, and must have been very 
effective. We would like to see more 
of this kind of advertising. 

John T. Hall is a good pho- 
tographer, and we understand is 
equally successful at radio. He has 
just completed a short wave set of his 
own design which enables him to re- 
ceive eastern stations at his will. 

Miss Lois B. Etter is now recep- 



tionist for Robert Bordeaux of Santa 
Barbara. IVIiss Etter is a recent ar- 
rival from Kansas City. 

Charles \[. Johnson, the oldest 
photographer in San Francisco, was 
painfully injured by an automobile 
while crossing Market Street at Sixth. 
He was taken to the Emergency Hos- 
pital where he was found to have lost 
several teeth and sufifering from se- 
vere bruises. He will be unable to 
leave his home for several weeks. 
.^ 

C, M. Kurtz is photographer for 
the Southern Pacific Railroad whose 
train No. 36 was recently held up and 
robbed under dramatic conditions in 
the East Bay district. He happened 
to be on the train during the robbery, 
but unfortunately had no camera with 
him. A small camera even of the Vest 
Pocket size type might have enabled 
him to obtain first hand pictures. 



^ANUARlj " 1931 

It is dgdin our pleasure to thank ijou for 
ijour generous patronage of the past i^ear. 

VJe wish i]ou all success for the coming 
year, and assure you of our best efforts to 
assist you to make the u;ish come true. 



r^irsch &L KDaue 



] 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-^ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 



Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact quality. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlarging paper for use where speed and 
quality are of equal importance. 

The Gevaert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
variety of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in an}' of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest quality. 



Descriptive Catalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

+ n-+21 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicago, III. Toronto, Can. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH & KAYE. 
San Francisco 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[11 



A New Tool for Photography 

THE PHOTOFLASH LAMP 

By R. E. Farxham and G. F. Prideaux, 
Engineering Dept., National Lamp Works. 



The recently developed Photo flash 
lamp of the Incandescent Lamp 
Department of the General Electric 
Company has provided the photo- 
graphic field with a new servant — 
one of much refinement — for procur- 
ing flashlight pictures. This servant 
performs its duties in a manner that 
is welcomed by both the photographer 
and his subject, 

WTiy? Because its features are such 
desirable ones as silence, cleanliness, 
safety, convenience, and effectiveness. 
These advantages aid in obtaining for 
the photographer invitations to meet- 
ings, banquets, weddings, and innu- 
merable occasions where heretofore he 
encountered closed doors. The ama- 
teur photographer also receives these 
benefits, and his field no doubt will 
be considerably widened. There is no 
fire hazard from burning flash ma- 
terial. Xo dense cloud of smoke to 
fill the interiors. No noise to frighten 
the subjects. The Photoflash lamp is 
as safe to use as the well known 
standard incandescent lamp. 

This lamp may be used in rain and 
high wind as easilv as in normal and 
fair weather conditions; there is no 
powder to blow away or to become 
moist. The glass bulb affords protec- 
tion against failure of the flash, and 
against fire hazard. 

Appearance 

Because of its unique appearance 
this new discovery is probably a mys- 
tery to anyone seeing it for the first 
time. The shape of the bulb and base 
may be recognized as that of the 
standard 100-watt \l a z d a lamp. 



Within the clear bulb, however, the 
construction is quite different. Instead 
of the usual coiled filament at the 
center, the interior is filled with 
crumpled aluminum foil and pure 
oxygen, which surround a tiny fila- 
ment of 1.5 volt rating coated with 
a special "Getter" that insures the 
flash when the filament is lighted. 

Life 

L^nlike the standard incandescent 
lamps, which are designed to burn 
1000 hours, this one has a life of only 
1/50 of a second, but in that time 
it gives one great burst of actinic light 
that serves adequately for taking a 
picture. 

Operation 

A very desirable and convenient 
characteristic of the Photoflash lamp 
is its flexibility for operation from 
various electrical sources. It is de- 
signed to operate on voltages ranging 
from 1.5 volts to 125 volts of direct 
or alternating current — that is, from 
a flashlight cell, storage battery, or 
house lighting circuit. The value of 
the voltage applied in no way influ- 
ences the volume of light given off by 
the flash. Every Photo-flash lamp is 
made to produce the same amount of 
light. 

In photographing large areas it is 
necessary to operate several lamps 
simultaneously. This condition is one 
requiring a larger electrical supply. 
Two or more dry cells, such as com- 
monly used for operating door bells, 
or the 115-volt house lighting circuit 
are very satisfactory. Photographers 
[ Continued on page 13 ] 



12} 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 




-J- 



Stop 
Waste- 
Reduce 
Labor & 
Expense 

Install STERLING D enveloping 
Tanks for Amateur Finishing, Com- 
mercial and Professional Work. Low 
Cost. Low L'^pkeep. Best Results. 
Made of the ver}- finest porcelain 
enamel. 

Turns out enormous amount of 
work daily. Best by Test. Ask for 
Circular. 

Sterling 
Photo Mfg. Co. 

BEAVER FALLSj PA. 



From the Melting Pot to Your 
Bank Aeeount 

ALBO 



Gets all the silver from \our Hypo 
Solution. The ideal precipitant — 
clean, odorless, speedy, complete re- 
covery. $3.00 for S-lb. can. Full di- 
rections enclosed. 



Prepared by Wildberg Bros. 
Smelting k Refining Co., San Fran- 
cisco, who will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price. 



§ 



Distributed hy 

HiRSCH Off Kaye 




FOR YOU 



Emulsions made and coated in the Hammer wa}- have 
the characteristics every picture maker is searching for. 

Hammer has made it possible for your negatives to have 
strength and at the same time a softness that will produce 
prints with brilliancy and detail. 

Hammer supplies Special Brands for Special Work and 
will mail you free of charge a portfolio of prints showing 
results you may expect. 

Write for your portfolio today. 



HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



159 West 22nd St., 
New York Citv 



Ohio .Ave. & Miami St. 
St. Louis 



^•■ 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[13 



Photo Fhish I. a Dips 

[ Conliniied from page 11 ] 

making flashlight pictures away from 
their studios will find it expedient to 
provide an outlet on their car and 
utilize the 6-volt automobile storage 
battery if they are out of reach of a 
lighting circuit power supply. 
Reflecting Equipment 

To obtain its full advantages, the 
Photoflash lamp should be used with 
suitable equipment. As the flash is 
confined entirely within the bulb, re- 
flectors may be used to collect and 
redirect the light into areas where it 
will be most useful. 

A reflector w^ill increase the effec- 
tiveness of the flash two or three fold 
under ordinary conditions, such as for 
out-of-door pictures, and in rooms 
with dark walls. Where the surround- 
ings for a photograph are of a light 
color, the conditions are more favor- 
able for light reflection, and the use 
of a reflector with the Photoflash lamp 
produces still better results. 

Aluminum with semi-matte surface 
has been found to be an excellent ma- 
terial for the Photoflash lamp reflec- 
tor, for it combines good light control 
with compactness, light weight, and 
low cost of manufacture. 
Single Lamp Units 

Frequently the situation requires 
the flash from a single Photoflash 
lamp. Numerous tests have shown 
that a lamp and reflector for each 200 
square feet of area will usually be 
satisfactory. This is based on a lens 
aperture of F-16 and anticipates a 
room with medium walls and light 
ceiling. A better conception of the 
number of lamps necessary for an ex- 
posure may be had if the relation be- 
tween the effect of a Photoflash lamp 
and flash powder is known. In tests 
using the "normal grade" of flash 



powder it has been observed that a 
single Photoflash lamp and reflector 
will produce on a film an effect 
almost equivalent to that produced by 
slightly less than one-half a teaspoon- 
ful of powder. 

A single lamp and reflector, such 
as previously described, provide am- 
ple illumination for photographing 
individuals, and groups of four to six 
people, with the camera lens operating 
at openings from F-8 to F-11. This 
is based on Kodak film, par speed 
film, and portrait panchromatic film 
or their equivalents. 

Multiple Units 

The types of commercial and pro- 
fessional work requiring several lamps 
for proper lighting employ other units. 
The reflectors may be mounted on 
tripods or hung on cords suspended 
from picture molding. For connecting 
the individual reflectors to the supply 
line, an extension cord with recep- 
tacle type taps at intervals of 5 or 6 
feet should be used. A momentary 
contact switch at the beginning of 
the line will flash all lamps simul- 
taneously. 

It is important, where the 6-volt 
storage battery is used, that the ex- 
tension cord be of adequate size to 
carry the current necessary to flash 
the lamps. For this purpose, where 
the distance from the electrical source 
to the last lamp is more than 50 feet, 
wire of No. 14 B.&S. gauge or larger 
should be used. 
Is It Fast? 

The duration of the flash is approx- 
imately l-50th of a second and is 
suflScient to "stop" the more usual 
movements of people. It is fast enough 
to obtain a photograph before the per- 
son can "blink," with the result that 
the pictures appear more normal. 

And noiv, see pages 16-17 this issue. 



14} 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930} 




SERIES II VELOSTIGMAT f4.5 

"TKe old stand by^* 



For more than two decades the Wollensak Series II Velo- 
stigmat has been accepted by leaders as the lens for all 
round studio and home portrait work — as well as for 
speed photography and copying and enlarging. 
An enviable record — without a superior. 



// you're not familiar ivith this versatile 
lens, tve will gladly tell you more about 
itj or lend one thru your dealer for ten 
days trial. Send for our catalog. 



"^ 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

872 HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



Manufacturers of quality photographic lenses 
and shutters since 1899 



-¥- 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[15 



-K 



This is Photography 



A new microscopic system which, us- 
ing invisible, ultra-violet light, is able 
to reveal the nature of minute objects 
with theoretically 19 per cent greater 
detail than the best visibile-light mi- 
croscope can yield was reported at 
Charlottsville, Va., to the Optical 
Society of America by A. P. H. Tri- 
velli of the Eastman Kodak Research 
Laboratories and Leon V. Foster of 
the Bauch & Lomb Optical Company, 
both of Rochester, N. Y. The micro- 
scope constructed by Mr. Trivelli and 
Mr. Foster is expected to be a further 
step in the process of permitting 
clearer pictures of microscopic objects 
to be made by biological scientists. 

Photomicrography by ultra-violet 
light is not new, but experimentation 
heretofore has been conducted with 
ultra-violet light from a point in the 
spectrum comparatively remote from 
the visible. The system worked out 
by the Rochester men uses light closer 
to the visible and yet makes the indi- 
cated 19 per cent gain over visible 
microscopic systems. Use of light 
nearer the visible portion of the spec- 
trum avoids the expensive necessity of 
using quartz instead of glass for lenses 
and in other ways is simpler than 
other ultra-violet microscopic systems. 
Also it permits the use of ordinary 
biological microscope slides with the 
object for examination mounted in 
Canada balsam. Previous ultra-violet 
micrography has required specially 
mounted slides because light of 
wave-lengths previously used was too 
greatly absorbed by balsam. 

Microscopy using visible light, ac- 
cording to Mr. Trivelli, "has reached 
such a state of perfection that very 
little more in the day of improvement 



can be accomplished. The use of ultra- 
violet light, however, has brought 
forth many surprising results." 

A demonstration of microscopic pic- 
tures obtained by visible light with 
the new microscope accompanied the 
paper. One comparison, with its sub- 
ject a grain of hollyhock pollen mag- 
nified 300 times, showed the minute 
object surrounded by nothing more 
than a vague, grey ring under visible 
light. The ultra-violet light picture of 
the same grains showed the ring re- 
solved into a circumference of tiny 
spines, previously not in evidence. 
Sharply increased detail showed in 
other ultra-violet photomicrographs of 
shells, leaves, and a section of calfskin. 

The light source of the Trivelli- 
Foster microscope has a wave-length 
of about 1 /70,000th of an inch, which 
is in the ultra-violet portion of the 
spectrum. Since ultra-violet light is 
invisible, the microscope's results are 
recorded on photographic materials. 
The system is so arranged that the 
object to be examined can be focused 
and viewed by visible green light and 
then, by a change of the light filter, 
photographed in the greater detail by 
ultra-violet light. 

Quoting the Trivelli-Foster paper 
on the comparison with visible mi- 
croscopy: "Photomicrography with ra- 
diation of 365 millimicrons" (about 
1 /70,000th of an inch) "makes avail- 
able a considerable increase of resolv- 
ing power" (ability to show detail at 
high magnifications), "or alterna- 
tively, if the resolving power obtained 
with visible light is sufficient, the use 
of the ultra-violet enables an increase 
of depth to be obtained by reduction 
of the aperture." 



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18] 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 




Opaque at a Single Stroke! 

When you buy opaque look for 
the time and money saving quali- 
ties offered in "Asco^^ — 

Will not crack or chip off. 

Fast working — quick drying. 

Rules perfectly with pen. 

Fine lines can be cut in clearly 

and easih' — Covers smoothly 

with thin film and it's 

Opaque on Clear Glass 
With One Coat! 

No. 0—2^ oz. $0.50 No. 2— 18 oz. $2.25 
No. 1—9 oz. $1.25 No. 5— Quarl $7.50 

A trial will convince you of the many 
superior qualities of 
"Asco" Opaque 

Garter's Wlhiite lek 



An excellent grade of 

white ink for lettering 

album leaves, mount- 

M|Mii I ings, etc. Applied with 

* * brush or pen. 




Per bottle. 



$0.20 



lediai lek 



Supplied in stick form for spotting 
negatives or prints. This ink is of the 
highest quality. 

India Ink, per stick $0.15 





No. Z 




Restores Faded Photos 

Will return faded photos to the 
original black and white regardless 
of how much they have faded. 

Either bromide, developing out 
paper, or any print in which the 
silver image has faded due to sul- 
phurization, or will return sepia 
prints to black and white. 

You will be amazed at this won- 
derful transformation when you 
see the finished photograph. 

Think of the possibility for more 
money and better work when you 
can renew a faded photo before 
making copy. 

And how many people have 
faded photos who \vould pay most 
any price to have them restored. 
The complete u?iit of four bottles 
ivill make three gallons of solution. 

Price $3.00 

This page contains material 
you need. . 

Order from 
HirSCH ^' K.AVE 
\QVK LOGICAL SOUKCK OK SUPPLY 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER - 1930] 



[19 



Professional Service 



~4- 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San Francisco 

Room 420 Phone PRospect 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

Carefully Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

xMatilda S. Ransdell 

3100 Fulton Street 
BAyview 4584 San Francisco 



GEORGE A. WEEDEN 

Artist 

Producer of 

Fine Crayons • Water Colors > Pastels 

Oil Paintings • Ivory Miniatures 

Air Brush Work 

711-47th Ave., San Francisco 

SKyline 2759 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service. Work Guar- 
anteed. 

J. K. PIGGOTTCO. 

86 Third Street San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artistically done in real oils or 
tints — from one to quantities. 



RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do your retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



EVER READY SERVICE 



Phone GRavstone 7912 



1285 Geary Street 



20 1 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



Send 
for Your 
Sample 

of 
Hydroquinone 




It will give better results 
and when trying it you will 
note: 

1. Its snow-white appearance. 

2. The brilliantly clear solution that it makes. 



Do you know whyf 



1. Too high a temperature in 
mixing causes staining? 

2. Impure chemicals cause col- 
ored developing solutions? 

3. Improper mixing of develop- 
ing formula causes weak so- 
lution that gives stain? 

Complete explanations will be 
found in our handbook, "Chem- 
istry of Photography." Write 
for your copy. 



Return This Coupon 



MALLINCKRODT 

CHEMICAL 

WORKS 

A constructive force in the chemical 
industry since 1S67 



A Mallinckrodt Hydroqui- 
none solution is not only free 
from any cloud but no suspended 
matter will be found. Clearness 
of solution is a safeguard against 
staining and spotting and is an 
indication of unusual purity. 



St. Louis 
Philadelphia 



Montreal 
New York 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Second and Mallinckrodt Sts. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

I enclose 50c for a 54-pound Sample of your 
Hydroquinone. 

□ Check if you want our handbook 

"Chemistry of Photography." 



Name ... 
Address 
City 



State.. 



[THE FOCUS FO R DECEMBER • 1930] [21 
4. 



Big News Ahead ^ 

Kodak World-Wide 

Picture-Making Competition 

to Boost Your Profits 

in 1931 

A CONTEST on a far bigger scale than the $30,000 Contest of 
1929 . . . and you remember what that did . . . will be staged 
during four peak months of 1931. 

Advance announcement at the St. Louis convention of the Mas- 
ter Photo Finishers of America simply raised the roof. Nothing 
like this contest has ever been attempted. 1931 will go down in 
history as a great year in amateur photography. 

This comprehensive plan for extra finishing profits is now re- 
ceiving its final touches and details will be announced in the next 
issue of the P'ocus. 

Watch for it! Read it! Act on it! 

Slogans: Their Construction and Use 

A distinctive slogan that identifies a house and its products is 
a proved business asset. 

First, your slogan should be truthful, and express your idea in 
such a way that it is easily remembered. 

Second, your slogan must be striking, concise, and worded so as 
to be easily read. 

And lastly, the slogan should tie in directly with your product 
or name. 

It is unwise to imitate or to paraphrase other well-known slo- 
gans, for example. "When better prints are made — Roe will make 
them." The public recognizes the slogan for what it is, an imita- 
tion. Avoid, too, trade-marks registered by others. 

(iood slogans are of the two types, simple statements of fact or 
unusual expressions. Here is an example of the straight statement: 
"Bring Us Your Films, You'll Like the Results." No exaggeration, 
brief, and stated so as to pull more business, and as the slogan 
always appears with the firm signature, easily identified. 

Harry Carhart's slogan, "My Business Is Developing" repre- 
sents the unusual type. Here the force of the slogan is to be found 
in the double meaning that makes a striking impression quickly. 
It is truthful, brief, and to the point, but lacks the direct sales 
suggestion found in the plain statement type of slogan. 

A good slogan, used consistently, can be a real business builder. 



22] 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



An Easel Frame Style 




THE MERIDIAN 



The illustration quicklj^ conveys the idea but cannot do justice 
to the beautiful colorings of the design in dark blue and platinum 
on the Walnut Veneer stock. 

Made with inslip openings from 3x4 to 7x9^, it covers a wide 
range of usefulness. Suitable for children, school and general por- 
trait work — groups, etc. In the 8x10 size it is also made for 
horizontal prints. 

Sizes 3x4 3^x5 4x6 5x7 8x10 

Prices per 100....$12.00 13.50 15.00 17.50 25.00 

It displays well — adds a new mode touch to gift and exchange 
portraits. 

Sample for fifteen cents 
Sample Offer F-69 



"^ 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 



(Eastman Kodak Company) 



Chicago, Illinois 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[ 23 



Jer r y ^ s 











^^1 l<tK>^ j^l 











Comer 



By Himself 



Ive been working on a big problem 
and Ive discovered the reason for di- 
vorce. Its marriage. 

To begin with, if a man dont get 
the right kind of wife these days, its 
his own fault. He can see what he's 
getting. 

Some birds that married to escape 
the draft are praying for another war. 

It is kistomary to cuss the bride 
at a wedding. 

Your wife will listen to excuses 
For the late hours that you keep ; 
Then You'll listen, listen, listen. 
Till, exhausted, fall asleep. 

J< 
Unhappy people : The fellow who 

was late for his wedding — but not 

late enough. 

A womans age is confessed by the 
kind of wedding ring she wears ; a 
man's by the tunes he whistles in the 
bathroom. 

Getting married makes a man save 
his money. That's how he pays his ali- 
mony. 

There never will be much of a mar- 
ket for these machines that can tell 
when you lie. Most men married one. 

Ask the man who owns one. 



Some men sure are lucky. I was 
readin about a man what had a wife 
who stood ten (10) feet away from 
him and fired three shots at him and 
missed. Aint every man can have a 
wife like that. 

The only time a married man is 
allowed to have his full say is when 
he talks in his sleep. 

.^ 

Even a married man can give 
orders nowadays — in a restaurant. 

If a married woman eats onions j^ou 
can be pretty sure she's still in love 
with her husband. 

Whatever troubles Adam missed. 
This must have made him sore, 

When he and Mother Eve fell out 
He couldn't slam the door. 

Mr. Wolff says he always carries 
a box of cough drops when he calls 
on a certain studio. The owner gives 
him a nice order but if his wife 
coughs, that's the signal to cancel it. 

Say it with flowers, say it with sweets, 
Say it with kisses, and say it with eats. 
Say it with jewelry, say it with drink. 
But whatever you do, don't say il 
with ink. 

Ierrv. 



24] 
-5^ 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



A letter just received from one of our 
customers in Nicaragua reminds us of 
an incident told in our office a short 
time ago. 

During the recent military activity 
in Nicaragua when the U. S. Marines 
were attempting to capture the rebel 
chieftain Sandino, a small party of 
marines led by their captain was cau- 
tiously proceeding along a lonely 
mountain trail. It had been raining 
and the men had been on outpost duty 
for some time. It had been weeks since 
they had read or heard the English 
language. 

Suddenly, around the bend of the 
trail, the leader saw a piece of wrap- 
ping paper to which was attached a 
blue and white label. The printing on 
the label was in English, and the 
wrapper created a great deal of inter- 
est because of this fact. The leader of 
the party tore the label from the paper 
for future reference, and on his re- 
turn to San Francisco called at the 
address mentioned, placed his order 
and told us of the incident. 

Yes, the label was a Hirsch & Kaye 
label and the package had been sent 
to another member of the expedition, 
who had covered the trail the day be- 
fore and had stopped to unwrap the 
film. 

Insurance Problems 
Analyzed 

Because of a lack of knowledge of 
the several ways in which an insur- 
ance policy may be interpreted, pho- 
tographers frequently pay more than 
they should for their insurance. Right 
now, if you will compare typewritten 
wording of your several policies, you 
are likely to find a difference in the 
description of your propertv. 

One of the benefits of membership 



in the P. A. of A. is an insurance 
service that is likely to save enough 
to pay your membership fee. It is but 
one of many advantages. 

The Photographers' Association of 
America maintains its services for its 
membership at International Head- 
quarters, 2258 Euclid Avenue, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

A Good Cleaning Solution 

A useful solution for cleaning enam- 
eled steel and stoneware may be pre- 
pared by dissolving 3 ounces potas- 
sium bichromate in 32 ounces of water 
and adding slowly with stirring, 3^ 
ounces of concentrated sulfuric acid. 
Hoivever, sulfuric acid must be han- 
dled with great care as it is very cor- 
rosive. This solution will remove de- 
veloper oxidation stains, silver stains 
and some dye stains. 

A 1 % solution of potassium per- 
manganate is also a good cleaning 
agent and should be followed by treat- 
ment with a 10% bisulfite solution to 
remove the manganese stain. After all 
stain remover treatments, the vessels 
should be washed thoroughly to re- 
move all traces of cleaning agents. 

Small enameled trays which have 
become etched and badly discolored 
should be discarded. Metal devel- 
oper traj^s should never be treated 
with acid cleaning agents. The most 
satisfactory way of cleaning such trays 
is to scrub them with a wire brush 
and a scouring powder. Treatment 
with a metal polish is also effective. 

CoPYiXG rough surface prints: To 
avoid showing grain, coat the surface 
of the print with glycerine, squeegee 
it to a sheet of glass and photograph 
it through the glass. All trace of sur- 
face grain is lost. 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[25 



-4- 



Sad — But True 

The latest catalog of equipment, is- 
sued by the Boy Scouts of America, 
contains numerous suggestions about 
the many professions and vocations, 
to help boys select a career. Photogra- 
phy is mentioned as follows : 

Photography 

Taking pictures as a hobby and 
making one's living as a photographer 
are quite different matters. The latter 
requires skill, study, special knowl- 
edge, and patience. There are a few 
good photography schools, but the 
most direct way to gain the necessary 
knowledge and experience is by work- 
ing in a photographer's studio. 

Equipment is expensive, and com- 
petition keen. In addition to fine 
workmanship a man must have sales 
ability, a pleasing personality and tact 
to build up a sound paying business. 

Their Own Faces 

Each of more than 350 of the promi- 
nent business men of Easton, Pa., was 
the recipient not so long ago of a 
mailing piece containing a photograph 
of himself. The piece was mailed by 
Hacket, Inc., clothiers, and consisted 
of a four-flap folder. On each of the 
flaps appeared a drawing in colors of 
a man wearing one of the season's 
new suits. On three of the flaps, the 
face of the man was cut out, appear- 
ing only on the bottom flag where 
it could peer through the cutouts of 
each of the others when properly 
placed over it. It was this face which 
presented the photograph of the re- 
cipient. 

How done? The store arranged to 
have a photographer take group pic- 
tures of the local Kiwanis, Rotary and 
Lions Clubs. 



Each head in these groups was then 
enlarged to fit exactly into the pic- 
tures on the folder. 

As the folders were furnished by 
one of the clothing manufacturers, the 
total cost of the campaign, not in- 
cluding postage, was only 11 cents 
apiece. 

— Dan Rennick, in October, 1930 
issue of Postage & The Matlbag. 

Here's Real Speed 

Speed of H & D 1000 Now 
J vail able 

A recent addition to the Gevaert line 
of dry plates is the Gevaert Super 
Press Anti-Halo plate with a regis- 
tered speed of H & D 1000. This is 
extremely fast, and believe it or not, 
this extremely rapid plate is quite free 
from grain. 

Here is a plate that will appeal to 
the plate user and press photographer, 
or anyone who requires a fast plate. 
Because the greatest demand for these 
fast plates will be in the 4x5 size, we 
will carry only this size. Price $1.20 
per dozen net, or in case lots, 30 doz- 
en to a case, $1.20 per dozen less 10%. 

Order some from Hirsch & Kaye 
and be prepared for this uncertain 
weather. 

The Front Page 

We are indebted to the Army Air 
Service for the picture on the front 
page. The view is of San Francisco, 
over the down town district, looking 
north. 

Mt. Tamalpais and the Golden 
Gate are in the background. Can you 
find the location of the proposed Gol- 
den Gate Bridge? 

Neither prosperity nor adversity is 
ever universal. 



Courtesy of 

Universal Pictures 

Corporation 





Luminosity Mali^es 
tlie Portrait Vivid 

Since the earliest days of art 
— long before photography 
was born — luminosity in the 
representation has been a pri- 
mary aim. For luminosity 
means reality, life. 

The brilliant richness and 
depth of prints from Agfa Por- 
trait Film negatives is by no 



means an accident. For the 
luminosity which produces 
this effect is built into the Agfa 
Portrait Film emulsion. 

Agfa Portrait Film is now 
obtainable in both regular and 
panchromatic. 




PORTRAIT 



J/K 



AGFA AlVSCO OF BINGHAM TON, N. 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[ 27 



-4^ 



Excellent Books for Your Use 



'^Retouching and Finishing 
For Photographers'' 

By J. Spencer Adamson 
Author of "Sketch Portraiture" 

This book is written for professional 
photographers who wish to know the 
latest methods and processes which are 
available for the retouching of pho- 
tographic negatives and prints. 

The retouching of negatives and 
finishing photographs in monochrome 
and color are important adjuncts to 
photography, particularly so in the 
field of professional portraiture. 

Affording a fair amount of scope 
for the expression of individuality 
calling for skill and knowledge, the 
work is really an art matter, one sym- 
pathetically responsive to the merits 
of artistic application. Over the long 
years of use no serious mechanical 
means has been devised to threaten 
abolition from the field of handicrafts ; 
and modernization, of course, has to 
be recorded, and it is with the mod- 
ern aspect and principles of the work 
that this volume is arranged to deal. 

137 pp., with 8 full-page plates and 
16 other illustrations. $1.20. 



"Commercial Photography" 

By Davio Chari.es 

Late Head Photographer to Marconi's 

Wireless Telegraphy Co., Ltd. 

The art of the photographer is now 
so largely used in connection with 
the production of modern commercial 
catalogues, showcards, and other ad- 
vertising media, that the need arises 



for the specialist or commercial pho- 
tographer. 

The author of this book has had 
more than 25 years' experience as a 
professional photographer, and gives 
many examples of the difficult subjects 
which may be encountered by the 
worker producing photographs for ad- 
vertising and other commercial pur- 
poses. He explains how to overcome 
the various difficulties which each pre- 
sents and describes the best method 
of carrying out the various routine 
jobs of the commercial photographer. 
There is also a chapter dealing with 
cost and bookkeeping. 

34 illustrations. $1.50. 



"'Photographic Printing" 

Professional and Commercial 
By R. R. Rawkin'S 

Valuable to those in charge of the 
printing rooms of professional photog- 
raphers. Full details of handling all 
the printing media and methods in 
regular use among professionals. The 
equipment and operation of a printing 
room, and the routine handling of 
printing and developing service. 

Cloth gilt, 120 pp., 15 illustra- 
tions. $1.25. 



"Photography As a Business" 

By Arthur (}. Wilms 
The business principles and methods 
the photographer must know to con- 
duct his work profitably. 
80 pp. $2.00. 



Order your books, as you would your supplies, 
from HiRSCH & KAYE 



COMPLETE CATALOG OF PHOTOGRAPHIC BOOKS ON REQUEST 



28 } 



{THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 




MADE IN THE FOLLOWING 
POPULAR SIZES 

No. 2 51^ X 7% 

No. 3 6% X 81^ 

No. 4 71^ X 9% 

*No. 5 ....- - 8% X 101/2 

*No. 6 -.. 10^/1x123/8 

*No. 7 - 121/2x141/2 

*No. 8 101/2x15 

No. 9 61^ x 914 

*No. 10 71/2 X 11% 

*No. 11 8%xll% 

*No. 12 13 X 171/2 

No. 14 16 X 2014 

'■'Packed in cartons containing 50 



The New INGENTO Photo Mailer 

Has the only double seal feature of string fastener 
and gummed flap, making it possible to mail photos 
to foreign countries or send them by first-class mail 
vs'hen privacy or additional safety is desired. 

The INGENTO is easily superior to any other photo mailer 
on the market. There is no chance of breaking photographs, 
drawings, sketches or any other valuable matter when this 
mailer is used, as they are perfectly preserved by the double 
corrugated board which covers the photograph or drawing 
both front and back. The capacity of this mailer is gi'eater 
than others and it is more quickly sealed. The various sizes 
we manufacture are made to take all the popular up-to-date 
mounts in use by the leading studios throughout the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now made 814X 
11% inches. It will accommodate photographs 8x10 or 7x11 
inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with super- 
strength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large prints, 
folders, enlargements and drawings. 

Manufactured by 

BURKE & JAMES, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH & KAYE 

SIZES for any need PRICES none can meet! 

Prompt Shipments 




Smrestick 

The New 
Vacuum Dispenser 

A White Liquid 
Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready, sticks quick- 
ly ; does not draw, discolor or harm your prints ; will not get stiff when 
exposed to air. 

SuRESTiCK never crackj loose whether slip under, corner mounts, parchment 
or tipped-on sheets. For gluing prints in albums, sealing backs of picture- 
frames, plaque work ■ — any place a high grade adhesive is required it is far 
superior. Only small amount required. A trial will convince you Surestick 
is right. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint 55c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars — Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 



[THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 



[29 



fams 



rapner 



No. 234 Photo Mailers 5^xllj4 Special price per hundred $1.50 

No. 240 " " 61^x13^ " " " 160 

No. 246 " " JYzxlSyi '■ •' " .....175 

No. 162 " " 13^x171^ '■ " " 4.75 

No. 160 " " 12 X 18 " ■' " 4.50 



Used Pako Washer in excellent condition. 
Described and illustrated on Page 78 
H & K catalog. 

Bargain Price ^60.00 

Used 8x10 F & S Printer. The platen is 
operated by foot treadle leaving both 
hands free for other use. 

Bargain Price ^12.50 

5x7 Korona View Camera with F4.5 
back and one holder. No carrying case 
or 5x7 back supplied. 

Bargain Price ^20.00 

Used 6J/2x8j/2 Korona View Camera 

with one film holder and carrying case. 
A description of this camera will be found 
on Page 6 H K catalog. 

Bargain Price ^27.50 

Callier Auto-Focus Enlar8;er. Designed 
for use with 5x7 negatives or smaller. 
Fitted with Series II F4.5 Velostigmat lens. 

Bargain Price ^85.00 

Halldorson Electric Studio Cabinet de- 
signed for use with four 1500 watt Mazda 
lamps, not included in bargain price. De- 
scription on Page 45 H £?" K catalog. 
Bargain Price ^67.50 

Popular Print Trimmer with 1 5-inch 
blade. 

Bargain Price ^7.75 



Duplex Junior Twin Arc Lamp de- 
scribed on Page 46 H £?" K catalog. No 
carrying case or diffusion attachment is 
provided, but the bargain price, ^37.50, 
is attractive. 

Halldorson Junior Studio Cabinet de- 
signed for use with two 1 500 watt photo 
blue lamps supplied with the cabinet. Sec 
Page 45 H &? K catalog. 

Bargain Price ^77.50 

Eastman Studio Reflector, illustrated on 
Page 39 of the U & K catalog. 

Bargain Price ^18.50 

Beattie Hollywood Hi-Lite. An excel- 
lent principal light for your studio. 

Bargain Price ^75.00 

8x10 Ansco Printer, complete with all 
lamps. 

Bargain Price ^25.00 

F £?' S Revolving Back enlarging cam- 
era for negatives 8x10 or smaller. See 
Page 12 H 6? K catalog for this article. 
Bargain Price ^25.00 

5x7 Eastman Auto-Focus Enlarger. In 
condition like new. Has hardly been used. 
See Page 75 H e^ K catalog. 
Bargain Price ^145.00 

Suitable diffusion disks for above Auto- 
Focus Enlarger at $5.00 ea. 



11x14 F 8C S Printer complete with Convenient terms of monthly payment 

necessary lamps. ^^p, ]^^ arranged for the purchase of any 

Bargain Price ^27.50 apparatus mentioned on this page. 



30] [THE FOCUS FOR DECEMBER • 1930] 

-¥■ 



AKTUKA IRIS 



At this time, more than any other in the photographer's 

year, quality means economy. That is often the 

deciding factor m the selection of Artura 

Ins for holiday portraiture. 



SURFACES 

Semi-Matt Maroquin 

Matt Buff Maroquifi 

Buff Medium Rough Matt White Rough-Medium Weight 

Buff Matt MonOkroM 

Plat Matt {Rough Luster) 

Buff Plat Matt Rose — Olive — Green — Blue 

""Veltex MonOkroM 

Plat Luster {Silk) 

Buff Plat Luster Rose and Green 
*Sinc/le Weight 



IF YOU CANNOT LOCATE A SOURCE OF SUPPLY FOR 

Artiira Iris 

PLEASE WRITE 

Defender Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, New York 



New Plate Standards 

Rstablished By 

Eastman Hyper-Press (Orthochromatic) Plates 
Wratten Hypersensitive Panchromatic Plates 

The Eastman Hyper-Press fits conditions 
demanding the fastest material obtainable. 
The press or commercial photographer 
who, regardless of light conditions, must 
get a picture, will find Eastman Hyper- 
Press fills the bill. 

With artificial illumination all ultra- 
speed materials, not red sensitive, necessarily 
fall ofFin speed. But under these conditions 
the Wratten Hypersensitive gains materi- 
ally in speed. With large aperture lenses 
instantaneous exposures may be made in 
well lighted theatres, at banquets or simi- 
lar social or sporting events. 

To be convinced there are really new 
standards in press plates try these new 
products at once. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Contact Prints or Enlargements 
The Same Quality — Same Tone 

Vitava Opal is a paper of the finest quality, producing 
beautiful warm tones, yet it is amply fast for enlarging. 
It solves the photographer's greatest problem. He can 
now make contact prints and enlargements, identical 
in quality and tone and texture. A new and economical 
Gold Toning Bath produces marvelous sepia tones. 
Opal is supplied in six grades — B, Semi-matte, and 
C, Matte, cream white; G, Fine grained lustre, and H, 
Fine grained matte, natural white; P, Fine grained 
lustre, and Q_, Fine grained matte, old ivory. All are 
double weight papers priced the same as double weight 
Vitava Rapid Black. Order now from your dealer. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



?; ^.f=a=^:^.^'^^:y^3:M;y^=SM^fe%x§^^X^f'K=^^^^g^5 '; ^ 



H 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 



Vol. VI 



NOVEMBER, 1930 



No. 11 




^UFOR/v>^.,^j^ 



Published by 

HIRSCH & KAY 

239 Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 




i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^mi 




Portrait by Leo W. Falls, 
Orlando, Fla. 



Can 

a paper 

be too 

good? 



A CHARMING subject that 

' ^ tugs at your heartstrings/ 
a properly adoring parent/ a 
thoroughly competent camera 
man with the deftness q\ a fine 
technician, a good film, — all re- 
sulting in a negative which is 
truly a work of art. And then 
— the choice of paper. 

Can any paper be too good 
for such a job — for any job 
that a photographer wants to 
be known by? 



Our answer is No — and 
that fine emulsion quality is 
accordingly/ at all times, our 
paramount duty to photograph- 
ers in the manufacture of — 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPERS 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



THE FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography by HiRSCH i^' Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol.. VI 



NOVEMBER, 1930 



No. 1 1 




INTRODUCING— 



J. f'entr Shatu/lr, 

Mfdford, 

Ore. 



j. Vern'e Shaxgle 
is a native of Port- 
land, Oregon. As a 
member of the Oregon Camera Club 
he found much pleasure in his cam- 
era, although baseball at one time 
threatened to influence his future. His 
first contact with photography was in 
Alaska where for four years he made 
some interesting camera studies. 

His present studio at IVIedford is 
his first and he has been there for the 
past two years. He admits that bank- 
ing thrills him, but what photographer 
wouldn't like that, especialh' being 
receiving teller? 

At the Portland Convention of the 
P. I. P. A. his pictures won first prizes 
and his work is well known in the 
Northwest. Perhaps his inspiration is 
his child, of which he has numberless 
pictures. Oh yes, he also has pictures 
of his wife. 

He is a member of the Southern 
(Oregon Photographers' Ass'n, the P.I. 
P.A., and P. A. of A. His hobbies are 
golf, fishing and his family. 

Still under thirty, he is active in 
the Lion's Club, being deputy district 
governor and secretary of the Med- 
ford club, den, or what do you call it. 

All of which is a pretty good start 



for a youngster, with an interesting 
future full of promise before him. 

"If time be of all things the most 
precious, wasting time must be, as 
poor Richard says, the greatest prodi- 
gality, since, as he elsewhere tells us, 
lost time is never found again, and 
what we call time enough always 
proves little enough. Let us then be 
up and doing, and doing to the pur- 
pose ; so diligence shall we do more 
with less perplexity. Sloth makes all 
things difficult, but industry all things 
easy; and He that riseth late must 
trot all day, and shall scarce overtake 
his business at night; while laziness 
travels so slowly that Poverty soon 
overtakes him. Drive thy business, let 
not that drive thee; and early to bed 
and early to rise, makes a man healthy, 
wealthy and wise, as Poor Richard 
says." 

— Benjamin Franklin. 
^ .^ 
The men whom I have seen succeed 
best in life have always been cheerful 
and hopeful men, who went about 
their business with a smile on their 
faces, and took the changes and 
chances of this mortal life like men, 
facing rough and smooth alike as it 
came. 

— Chas. Kingsley. 

Gettin' the other fellow's customers 
means nothin' unless you're holdin' 
your own. 



4] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



>>>>>>>>>>> 



^^r J9^^^SLi^^SKj 




F«f5^ 


H^S^^^HMmHf -''^ 


r "'^if 


m^u m 



>>>>>>>>>>> 



An interesting study made by J. E. Mock of 
Rochester, N. Y., with the 16 inch focus Series 
B Beach Multi-focal lens at full aperture 
{equivalent to /3.3.) 



PROPORTIONS 

as actually seen by the eye 



Not extremely sharp in outline — nor unwarranted soft- 
ness but actually an effect as it appears to the eye — a 
full rounded form. 

THE BEACH 
MULTI-FOCAL LENS 

produces the quality demanded by the most fastidious 
photographers. 

Allotv us to tell you more about this new lens — or ive 
will send one to you without obligation on ten days' trial 
— thru your dealer. 

WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

872 HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Manufacturers of quality photographic lenses 
and shutters since 1899 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[^ 



Is Photography a Fine Art? 

We quote, lierev.-'itli, the introductory paragraphs 

of Katlierine irilson's article in "California Arts and Architecture" 

concerning tlie artistic photography of Dr. Leonard B. Loeh, 

of Berkeley. 



It may be that the moot old question, 
"Is Photography a Fine Art?", will 
not in our day be answered to the 
satisfaction of either party to the de- 
bate. So stubbornly does Art insist 
upon the verdict of Time! 

A considerable distance from our 
mechanical age may be required to 
reveal among our creations the artis- 
tic god in the machine. Meanwhile, 
the poor, muddled layman, groping in 
a maze of definitions, continues to 



of what constitutes Art, perhaps the 
most direct is that which declares a 
fine art to be "any medium of ex- 
pression which permits one person to 
convey to another an abstract idea of 
a lofty or ennobling character, and to 
arouse in him a lofty emotion." Since 
Art, it is emphasized, is not repre- 
sentative, but interpretative, "Art," 
says another, "is nature (life) seen 
through a personality." What it all 
comes to seems to be that the measure 



wonder why an artistic composition of anyone's creative gift — painter or 



may not be produced as successfully 
through a lens as by a brush or pencil. 
After all, is his common-sense declara- 
tion, what matters is not so much hoic 
a thing is done, as what is done, and 
ivhy. Who gives a hang about tech- 
nique ? 

But, protests the Artist, compas- 



photographer — is his capacity, first, 
for seeing beauty and being moved by 
it, and then for so recording it in his 
pictures as to convey his feeling to 
others. None of these definitions, 
please note, says anything about pencil 
or brush, graver or lens ! So, in the 
long run, the difference between the 



sionately, artistic compositions don't painter and the photographer appears 
just happen; they're made. And the to be one neither of viewpoint nor of 



trouble with the photographer is 
that with a camera he can't make. He 
has to take things as finds them — 
he can't be "choosey" ; and being 
"choosey" is before everything else 
what characterizes the artist. 

Ho, retorts the Photographer, but 
artistic compositions do happen — if 
you have an eye for them ; and being 
"choosey" is precisely what the pho- 
tographer must be. All that he has 
to do is to recognize a composition 
when he sees it, and make the most 
of it. 

Yes, replies the artist, loftily, and 
there's just the difference! At which 
impasse the controversy rests. 

Among the innumerable definitions 



tools but of method. The painter, 
starting with a blank canvas, selects 
such details as he chosses, and — in 
such order as he pleases, excluding 
as he sees fit — transfers them to it to 
make a balanced composition. The 
photographer, on the other hand, from 
a multiplicity of details ranged be- 
fore him must find and record by 
mechanical means such a ready-made 
group as makes a balanced composi- 
tion — a task which one might with 
some justice suspect of being the more 
remarkable task of the two! If to suc- 
ceed in this is a rare achievement, is 
his art necessarily the worse for its 
rarity? 



6] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER . 1930 



Professional Service 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San Francisco 

Room 420 Phone PRospect 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

Carefully Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

Matilda S. Ransdell 

3100 Fulton Street 
BAyview 4584 San Francisco 



GEORGE A. WEEDEN 

Artist 

Producer of 

Fine Crayons • Water Colors • Pastels 

Oil Paintings • Ivory Miniatures 

Air Brush Work 

711-47th Ave., San Francisco 

SKyline 2759 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service. Work Guar- 
anteed. 



J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 



86 Third Street 



San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artistically done in real oils or 
tints — from one to quantities. 

RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do yuur retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITEO 

EVER READY SERVICE 

Phone GRaystone 7912 1285 Geary Street 



^- 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[7 



-4- 



The Front Page 

The picture on the frnot page of 
this issue is of special interest to our 
readers. The scene is in the office of 
Governor C. C. Young of California, 
as he received a delegation from the 
Capital City Women's Post of the 
American Legion. 

The picture was made by Frederick 
& Burkett of Sacramento, who tell us 
it was illuminated by one Photoflash 
bulb, in hand reflector. Gevaert Super 
Chromosa plate was used in Press 
Graflex, with lens stopped to F8. Dis- 
tance was 15 feet. 

Governor Young expressed great 
interest in the Flash bulb, and ex- 
pressed his appreciation at the absence 
of smoke. Frederick & Burkett will 
hereafter use only Photoflash bulbs. 

G'we What You Promise 

A photographer who advertised Porce- 
lain Miniatures delivered his pictures 
on celluloid with opal surface. His 
customer took the frame apart, and 
claimed substitution with demand for 
porcelain photograph as promised. 

The photographer in this case had 
no desire to misrepresent or substitute 
to his customer, and explained the al- 
leged substitution to the satisfaction 
of his customer. 

But be careful of how you word 
your advertising. If you create the 
impression that a porcelain plate will 
be furnished, you must be prepared 
to deliver what you advertise or have 
an understanding with your customer 
at time of accepting the order. 

1931 
A Big Year For You 

News of great importance to photog- 
raphers is about to be released. We 



cannot give you details, but can sug- 
gest that you look for important an- 
nouncements to follow. 

Beattie Lights I mproved 

Several new and distinctive features 
are announced by the maker of the 
famous Beattie Hollywood Lights. 
Not new models, but practical im- 
provements of efficient equipment. 

The most important is the new 
drapery screen — a blue silk side 
screen fastening to front of cabinet. 
It need be rarely adjusted, yet will 
prevent overlighting floor and lower 
part of figure. Spring ball tensions 
hold the screw as adjusted. 

A unique feature of this new screen 
which we had not foreseen is its value 
as a distance gauge. Should the lamp 
be too far from subject to produce 
a soft, round lighting, the drapery 
screen will not affect the lighting. 
As many operators apparently do not 
realize that softness results from op- 
eration of the lamp close to subject, 
this "gauge" should prove a real help. 

Both switches are now of the flush 
tumbler type, set into housing, almost 
within reach of the man at the cam- 
era. All controls are thus centered in 
the one unit. 

The cable is now solid rubber — no 
covering to collect dirt or to fray. 
A wet cloth will alwavs make it look 
like new. 

The drapery screen alone, to fit 
(^detas now in use, costs $10.00. For 
the Norma, $8.00. 

Beattie Odeta and Norma Lamps 
are in stock. See Page 48 — H & K 
catalog, and remember, a Beattie 
Light installed now, can be purchased 
on easv terms. 

.^ ^ 
Wild oats make poor breakfast food. 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



Send 
for Your 
Sample 
of 



Hydroquinone 




It will give better results 
and when trying it you will 
note: 

1. Its snow-white appearance. 

2. The brilliantly clear solution that it makes. 



Do you knozu whyf 

1. Too high a temperature in 
mixing causes staining? 

2. Impure chemicals cause col- 
ored developing solutions?- 

3. Improper mixing of develop- 
ing formula causes weak so- 
lution that gives stain ? 

Complete explanations will be 
found in our handbook, "Chem- 
istry of Photography." Write 
for your copy. 



Return This Coupon 



MALLINCKRODT 

CHEMICAL 

WORKS 

A constructive force in the chemical 
industry since 1S67 



A Mallinckrodt Hydroqui- 
none solution is not only free 
from any cloud but no suspended 
matter will be found. Clearness 
of solution is a safeguard against 
staining and spotting and is an 
indication of unusual purity. 



St. Louis 
Philadelphia 



Montreal 
New York 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Second mid Mallinckrodt Sis. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

I enclose 50c for a ^^-pound Sample of your 
Hydro(}uinone. 

□ Check if you want our handbook 

"Chemistry of Photography." 



Name ... 
.Address 
City 



State.. 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[9 



Credits and Collections pressing them should be appreciated, 

[ A reprint from Photo Trade News, but it is a queer psychological fact 

published by Mullett Bros., Kansas that it acts the Other way, and the 

Citv, Mo. The situation is one that i„ ,„ i ^ -.^ ^u u j v • 

. ; ' ., • T longer you neglect it, the harder it is 

IS frequently our own experience. J & .- t, > 

,,, t 1 r II to collect. The older a debt gets, 

We quote below from three letters • i • ■ i i-rr i 

, , ... , , seemingly it is the more dirhcult to 

that have passed this month between , , , , ^ ,, 

, 11- P^'^V, and the debtor hnally comes to 

one oi our customers and the writer. , . , , i i / -n 

,j, , ,. ., , , ,, regard it as the last debt he will pay. 

We believe it photographers generally •. i, 

would recognize the truth of the j , , . ■ ■ ^ 

, , 111 A nave a number or cases in mind 

statements in these letters and would ■ , . , , 

, „ II 1 • 1 -11 right now; some or my best personal 

make more enort to collect their bills, , . , . .... i ,i ■ 

, , , , , , , . friends in this business are badly in 

they would have less trouble in meet- i t i • ^ 

■ , . . ,. . -T-1 1 arrears to me and 1 hesitate to ask 

ing their own obligations. 1 he letters , . i t i 

, ,, them for money, and yet 1 know some 

follow: . , " , 

competing houses, who are not per- 

Sept. 12, 1930. sonal friends of theirs, have insisted 

Mr. Warren Mullett, on payment and have collected their 

Kansas City, Mo. accounts and are getting their busi- 

Dear Sir: ness, while I, a personal friend, am 

There is quite a goodly amount due getting neither, 

me on work, which I could get if I Yours very truly, 

would go after it, but that would Warren Mullet, 
cause me to lose some good customers, 

which I do not want to do. These Sept. 16, 1930. 

people have been having a hard time Mr. Warren Mullett, 

lately, some of the men having been Kansas City, Mo. 

out of work for some time, and others Dear Sir: 

have had work but part time, and I have found that it does not do to 

some have had their wages cut. I have wait too long on those who owe me, 

sued and collected off of a few who for if they do not intend to pay, they 

I felt sure would not pay, but feel I will not come back for more work, 

should try and wait on those who I so they are lost as customers anyway, 

am certain want to, and will pay. and the only thing to do is to go after 

Very truly yours, them and get what is coming to me. 

There are some who, I am sure, will 

pay and get their pictures just as soon 

Sept. 15, 1930. as they can. Meanwhile, I do not let 

^^ them forget that they owe me. 

Very truly yours. 

Dear Sir: 

I appreciate exactly the position you -J* ^'i 

are in. I have the same thing myself Getting the most out of a roll of 

to contend with, but the longer I stay film and into a set of prints is easy for 

in business the more convinced I be- you to promise; easy for us to do. Our 

come that it is an error not to call equipment, materials, and "Know 

customers' attention to their accounts how" are your assurance in assuring 

when they are past due. Your not your customers. 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan \)ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 



Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portr.4it Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact quality. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlarging paper for use where speed and 
quality are of equal importance. 



The Gevaert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
varietj' of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in any of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest quality. 



Descriptive Catalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

413-+21 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicago, 111. Toronto, Can. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH SC KAYE, 
San Francisco 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[11 



ProtectuKj Your Phototjrdphs 
by Copyright 

[ Pasic this arliclc in a handy place 
for future rffcrrncr.] 

So many photographers have lost 
money by failing to have photographs 
copyrighted, simply because the aver- 
age person thinks of copyrighting as 
a difficult and involved proceeding. 
Copyrighting is a very simple process 
and costs only fifty cents. An expen- 
diture that may save you thousands 
of dollars later. Here is the way to 
go about copyrighting a photograph : 

You can obtain copyright protec- 
tion as soon as your negative is made, 
simply by putting a C in a circle, to- 
gether with your initials or vour 
trademark, if you have one. At the 
same time make two extra prints and 
fill out the information on the blank 
form which may be obtained in ad- 
vance from the Registrar of Copy- 
rights, Washington, D.C. Send this 
form properly filled out and accom- 
panied by two identical prints of each 
picture to be copyrighted, together 
with the fee of 50 cents for each pic- 
ture for which copyright is desired to 
the Registrar of Copyrights at Wash- 
ington. That's all there is to it. 

On the back of each print you 
make, after you have copvrighted the 
photos, in addition to the C in the 
circle on the face of the print, a rub- 
ber stamp copyright notice with the 
year copvright was obtained and your 
business name and address should 
appear. Unless the C in the circle 
appears on the face you have little or 
no protection. Draw this C on the 
negative in one corner where it will 
not deface the picture. 

It is practically impossible to copy- 
right a portrait when the subject has 
ordered and paid for the photographs 



in the regular manner. But if the sub- 
ject is a hired model or if the photo- 
graphs were taken free then you may 
get copyrights. 

In order to protect your copyright, 
your name must appear on all printed 
reproductions of the photograph you 
have copyrighted, as a credit line, as 
well as appearing on the picture itself 
in the form of the C in the circle, 
with your initials or trademark. 

Write at once to the Registrar at 
Washington, D. C, for a supply of 
copyrighting blanks and have them on 
hand, there is no telling when you 
may need them. 

(A good suggestion, from Licher's 
Photo News.) 

.Ipprccuiiion 

Havixg but shortly returned from 
my vacation and started to get accum- 
ulated matters settled, I am enclosing 
check in payment of the two accom- 
panying invoices. I wish also to take 
the opportunity to express my appre- 
ciation of the speed with which the 
back order of plates was handled. The 
plates arrived at the Grand Canyon 
in accordance with my instructions 
well before I left, though it seemed 
to me far too short a time even for 
your order to reach New York, to say 
nothing of the plates reaching me. 

I am asking our Purchasing Office 
to place an order with you for some 
plates and other supplies. 

Again thanking you for your effi- 
cient courtesy, I am, 

E. F. C. 
J* 

Thank you for your courteous let- 
ter of Sept. 15th I'egarding final pay- 
ment of tank contract account. It is 
a real pleasure to do business with 
your firm. R. C. J. 



2] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 




Scotch Photographic Tape 



Requires 

No Moistening 

It consists of heavy, black, crepe 
paper coated with an adhesive that 
needs no moistening and Hes per- 
fectly flat. Is easily removed leaving no residue and can be used repeatedly. 

So?ne Suggested Uses 

To hold negatives to the plate glass of the printer. 

For blocking out borders and making masks. 

For general use as lantern slide binding. 

Replaces thumb tacks in commercial layouts. 

Can be used in place of opaque for straight edges. 

For repairing broken negatives, torn prints and camera bellov.s. 

1 in. X 10 yd, $.40; i^ in. x 72 yd., $.82; 1 in. x 72 yd., $1.33. 

HIRSCH & KAYE have it 

Surestick 

The New 
Vacuum Dispenser 

« « « 

A White Liquid 
Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready, sticks quick- 
ly; does not draw, discolor or harm your prints; will not get stiflF when 
exposed to air. 

SuRESTiCK never crac\s loose whether slip under, corner mounts, parchment 
or tipped-on sheets. For gluing prints in albums, sealing backs of picture- 
frames, plaque work — any place a high grade adhesive is required it is far 
superior. Only small amount required. A trial will convince you Surestick 
is right. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which mav be refilled 

Half Pint 55c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars — Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 
Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 




^- 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[13 



Aerial Filters 

The increasing popularity of aerial 
photography among so-called "ground 
photographers" prompts us to give 
you some information about aerial fil- 
ters. The most popular filters in use 
are Aero No. 1 and No. 2 and the 
Minus Blue. The K2 and K3 Wrat- 
ten filters are also used, but are not 
as popular as the filters especially 
made for aerial conditions. The ac- 
tual selection of filters depends upon 
light and haze conditions, the charac- 
ter of sensitized material used, and 
the height at which the picture is 
made. 

When portrait panchromatic or 
commercial panchromatic film are 
used or W & W panchromatic plates, 
the Aero No. 2 filter will be satisfac- 
tory, provided the pictures are made 
at altitudes between 1500 and 3000 
feet. Should you use Type 2 panchro- 
matic Aero film, the same filter is 
suggested. When hyper-sensitized 
Aero panchromatic film is used, the 
Minus Blue filter is recommended, 
especially when pictures are made at 
high altitudes and through a dense 
haze. 

For detailed information about these 
filters and conditions under which 
they are best used, we suggest "Aerial 
Haze and Its Effect on Photography 
From the Air," a modern and inter- 
esting publication which we can fur- 
nish for $2.50. 

^^ ^ 
Suggest enlargements as Christmas 
gifts ... to many of your customers 
the idea will not only be decidedly 
new, but decidedly welcome. It's 
worth trving. 

AcTiox is here ; inaction, hereafter. 




Putz Pomade 

PuTZ Pomade is a smooth working 
friction reducer. As a local reducer 
this preparation is without a peer. It 
is applied with a soft cloth or tuft of 
cotton. Since the action is purely me- 
chanical it is entirely at the command 
of the retoucher at all times. 

The use of Putz Pomade permits 
the operator to reduce any portion of 
the negative to just the exact degree 
desired. The preparation is so fine 
that it may be applied to the most 
delicate portion of the negative, and 
it will never scratch. It reduces 
more evenly because of its smooth 
consistency ; moreover, it is indispen- 
sable for bringing up hair, draperies, 
and the light portions of the picture. 

Putz Pomade is supplied in con- 
venient tins. It never becomes caked, 
lasts longer than other similar prepa- 
rations, and does not leave the nega- 
tive greasy. Photographers and others 
will be glad to know that this very 
popular reducing paste is now avail- 
able in our stock. Mr. Beattie recom- 
mended the use of Putz Pomade. 
during his school of lighting. 

We offer the preparation in con- 
venient three ounce tins for 25 cents 
each. 

^ ^^ 
Save your copies of The Focus for 
future reference. 



14} 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 




Our Salesmen Tell Us 



Miss Esther Culver has opened 
her home portrait studio at 2682 Par- 
ker Avenue, Berkeley. 
.^ 

The studio of P. H. Miller, 
Fruitvale Avenue, Oakland, has been 
purchased by Mrs. Paffrath, who un- 
til recently operated her own studio 
in Reno. 

This recently appeared in the S. F. 
Chronicle, under the head of "25 
Years Ago" : 

"The Photographers' Association 
of California launched a movement to 
bring the convention of the national 
association to San Francisco. Louis 
Thors, Lawrence F. Terkelson, C. F. 
Priest, Paul Lotz and G. H. Knight 
of San Francisco, O. V. Lange of 
Berkeley, L. M. Powell of Hanford 
and E. J. McCullough of Palo Alto 
were active in the meeting of the 
State association, which was held in 
this city. 

Sydney Walton of the De Forest 
studio, San Francisco, was married on 
October 6. He married Miss Mildred 
Randolph of Gridley, at the home of 
the bride's parents. 

"Foto Nezvs," that unique "sheet" 
of the East Bay Commercial Photog- 
raphers' Club, has completed volume 



L It is a clever and practical way to 
keep members and friends informed of 
the activities of this live wire group. 

Carol G. Land of Placerville has 
completed a most attractive home on 
the hill overlooking the city. Consid- 
ering his physical handicaps, we can 
truthfully say that Mr. Land is prob- 
ably the most aggressive and certainly 
the hardest-working photographer of 
whom we have any knowledge. Inci- 
dentally, Mr. Land is a graduate tax- 
idermist, and by way of avocation has 
prepared many of the elk heads on 
display in Elk lodge rooms about the 
state. 

J. T. Nelson of Santa Rosa has 
opened a branch studio at 409 State 
Street, Ukiah. Mr. Nelson's residence 
of several years in Santa Rosa makes 
him quite familiar with conditions in 
the neighboring city. 

A most timely and appropriate slo- 
gan appears on the tire cover of 
George Decker's car: "Elect Decker 
your photographer," followed by the 
address, Petaluma. The slogan will 
be changed to something appropriate 
to the holiday season, after the No- 
vember election. A fine idea, too. 
Helps to make the public picture- 
minded. What do vou use? 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[ H 



-^ 



In the September issue of "Studio 
Light." we were pleased to read a 
suggestion submitted by R. H. Whel- 
DOX of Petaluma. Mr. Wheldon's 
suggestion is that negatives made at 
vacation time and possessing pictorial 
quality can be enlarged on distinctive 
papers, plate-sunk and made really 
works of art to be framed and hung 
in the homes of the owners of the 
negatives. This is more attractive than 
the usual form of bread-and-butter 
enlargement. 

The studio of Geo. W. Davis, 
1853 Fillmore Street, was damaged 
by an uncontrolled automobile, which 
crashed through the window. 

H. Laxc ASTER has opened his San 
Francisco Studio at 1109 Market St. 
His former studio in IVIartinez was 
turned over to his son, Ernest, who 
has been associated with his father for 
the past several years. The opening of 
the studio was quite a social event, in 
which his numerous friends in the 
profession in the Bay region partici- 
pated . 

BuRTOX Etter, 1353 Haight St., 
San Francisco, spent the first week of 
October at the mouth of the Klamath 
River on a fishing trip. He caught 
the limit each day and one steelhead 
trout weighed 10 pounds. He actually 
caught this one, but strange to say, 
has told us nothing about the still 
bigger ones that got away. 

J. B. Rhea, ^lonte Rio photog- 
rapher, sent vacation greetings from 
Ojai, Ventura County. To many of 
us, who are glad to go to the Russian 
River country, it seems unnatural to 
have a resident of Monte Rio seek a 



vacation in anv other place. It shows 
that no matter what we have, we like 
a change. 

News of the sudden death of Ser- 
GEAXT CjOR.max A. Charles, a pic- 
turesque and well-known figure at the 
Presidio, where he was army photog- 
rapher for years, reached here from 
Honolulu. His death occurred on the 
army transport Somme just as the 
vessel reached port. He had expected 
to go later to Washington to assist in 
developing sound films for the army. 
His wife was with him at the time of 
his death and returned with the body 
on the Somme. 

js 

Mrs. Paul Strahm of Reno has 
just returned from a four months' 
tour of Europe, touching the various 
centers of the old world and of course 
the home town in Switzerland. Of 
particular interest to the writer was 
her report of the industrial chaos ex- 
isting in numerous European manu- 
facturing activities brought about by 
the new American protective tariff. 
Swiss watch makers and lace manu- 
facturers are among the hardest hit. 
In Switzerland a national subsidy 
has been established to take care of 
plants and workmen until such time 
as a readjustment has been established. 
Americans are generally well thought 
of, Mrs. Strahm states, but the same 
kindlv feeling is not held toward some 
of our governmental policies. 

Mrs. R. J. Baker, wife of the well 
known Honolulu photographer, has 
returned home after a lengthy and 
enjovable motor trip, embracing a 
large part of this country, even to the 
Atlantic coast. 










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18] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 




Made in the Folloimng 
Popular Sizes 

No. 2 51/ X 7^ 

No. 3 6^x 8^ 

No. 4 7^x 914 

*No. 5 8^x101/4 

*No. 6 10^x123/^ 

*No. 7 12^ x 141/^ 

*No. 8 10y2 X 15 

No. 9 6^x 9^ 

*No. 10 7^ X 115/^ 

*No. 11 81^x111/ 

*No. 12 13 xl7^ 

No. 14 16 X2O14 

*Packed in cartons 



The New 

Ingento Photo Mailer - 

Has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gummed flap, making it possible 
to mail photos to foreign countries or send 
them by first-class mail when privacy or addi- 
tional safety is desired. 

The Ingento is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking 
photographs, drawings, sketches or any other valu- 
able matter when this mailer is used, as they are 
perfectl}' preserved by the double corrugated board 
which covers the photograph or drawing both front 
and back. The capacity of this mailer is greater than 
others and it is more quickly sealed. The various 
sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popu- 
lar up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios 
throughout the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
made 8^xllJ/2 inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8x10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board: it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



containing fifty 

Manufactured by Burke & James^ Inc.^ Chicago, Illinois 

Carried in Stock by HiRSCH & Kaye 

SIZES FOR ANY NEED.' PRICES NONE CAN MEET.'' PROMPT SHIPMENTS.'' 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For sale by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



WANTED 

Experienced woman for soliciting 
studio and home portrait appoint- 
ments. No coupons or agents. Salary 
or commission. 

Edward S. Curtis Studios, 
Riltmore Hotel, Los Angeles. 



Cameras sold at Christmas assure 
a new year of new film and finishing 
business. It's a true case of eating 
3'our cake (profits from the camera 
sale) and having it too (continued 
profits from the sale of film and fin- 
ishing). 



-¥- 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[ 19 



Report Cameramen 
Manhandled 

Interference by policemen when 
commercial and press photographers 
attempted to obtain pictures of the 
landing of the famous French trans- 
Atlantic flyers, Coste and Bellonte, at 
Dallas, Tex., on September 5 has 
aroused great indignation among pho- 
tographers in the Southwest. 

According to a news story in the 
Fort Worth Record, at least five- 
photographers were mistreated. The 
newspaper said, "J. D. Hayes, shoot- 
ing for Frank Rogers, a commercial 
photographer, had a half dozen good 
shots when a policeman attacked him, 
split his lip and smashed his camera 
and plates." 

L. B. Johnson, an employee of the 
Higginbotham Company of Dallas, 
engaged by the Associated Press to 
secure pictures of the historic event, 
was knocked down three times by a 
policeman, say the newspaper reports. 

Immediately after the affair, Guy 
N. Reid, Secretary of the Southwest- 
ern Professional Photographers' Asso- 
ciation, and C. A. Taylor, President 
of the Fort Worth Photographers' 
Club, protested by letter and telegram 
to Mayor J. Waddy Tate of Dallas. 
These protests were given much pub- 
licity in Texas newspapers. 

Don V. Chapman, Secretary of the 
Photographers' Association of Amer- 
ica, wired Mayor Tate at once, asking 
for official details about the matter. 
Mr. Tate's telegraphic reply was as 
follows: "Investigation discloses diffi- 
culty at airport during Coste-Bellonte 
arrival was rather trivial incident of 
disorganized event. Arrival was at 
unexpected time and photographers 
without badges surged forward with 
crowd into forbidden area and re- 



ceived same treatment as remainder of 
crowd. No intention to mistreat pho- 
tographers and believe all their trou- 
bles due to lack of preliminary ar- 
rangements and being unprepared at 
unexpected arrival. Coste and Bel- 
lonte came in unexpectedly without 
convoy sent to meet them." 

We print this article because of the 
explanation given by Mayor Tate. 
It is always well to be equipped with 
proper credentials when you attempt 
to take pictures of public events. 
^ ^^ 
Still Growing 

If you have not visited our store re- 
cently, you will notice a considerable 
change the next time you come. Con- 
tinued growth of business taxed our 
store considerably for all the space 
that can be obtained, and it was 
necessary to build a mezzanine floor 
over the rear portion of the store, to 
relieve the congestion. As the store 
has a very high ceiling, the mezzanine 
evidences noticeable physical changes, 
and we really think the addition to 
the store is an attractive one. 

A-Iuch of the work was done at 
night to avoid inconvenience to our 
visitors, but it was difficult to get 
away from the odor of paint and the 
presence of workmen. Notwithstand- 
ing adverse comment on business con- 
ditions that we hear at various times, 
we are glad that conditions made it 
necessary for expansion in this way, 
and in reply to the usual salutation, 
we can honestly answer, "Business is 
good." 

^ ^^ 
EvER^' good small picture is a better 
picture enlarged . . . and selling en- 
largements, incidentally, is an effec- 
tive way of enlarging your profits. 



20 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 





Light! 

Instantaneous! 

Absolutely Safe! 

Positive Flash! 

Under Water! 

In Mines! 

In Rainy or Dry Weather! 



That, briefly, is a description of the newest method of artificial 
lighting. The General Electric laboratories have produced a glass 
enclosed flashlight that looks like an ordinary Mazda lamp of 100- 
watt size. Inside the bulb is a thin foil of highly combustible material 
that is consumed in 1/100 of a second. The bulb has the usual threaded 
base found on all electric lamps. 

The bulb is not refillable, but the advantages are many. Think of 
photography under water, in rain or snow, in mines, magazines, air- 
planes and other areas closed to the usual flash exposure! 

Ignition is extremely simple. Any electric current from 1 ]/> volts 
upward will ignite the bulb. A pocket flashlight will do it. 

Preliminary tests on comparative results of the flashlamp and pow- 
der show that a single flashlamp in a suitable reflector gives a pho- 
tographic illumination intensity equivalent to approximately fifteen 
to twenty grains of powder. These figures were obtained by actually 
measuring the densities of photographs taken of the same subject with 
both lamp and powder. 

Density measurements made in connection with colored objects 
shows that the photoflash lamp gives a fairly strong rendering in the 
orange-yellow region and that the light is extremely strong in the 
blue-violet region where photographic materials are most sensitive. 
The light is a little deficient in the extreme red and not so strong in 
the green. 

Photo Flash Bulbs 

Price each $ .25 net 

In lots of 12 Less 10% 

In lots of 50, a standard pkg Less 20% 

In lots of 250 Less 25% 

Hand reflector, battery and handle as illustrated, with- 
out bulb 5.00 

Flashrite reflector, battery and handle, without bulb 3.75 

Flashrite reflector, battery and handle, without bulb for 

2 or 3 bulbs 6.00 



Place your order for a trial lot and be convinced 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[21 



BARBER AUTOMATIC UNIT 

For All Pako Foot Printers 



Now Pako offers a new item to 
finishers . . . one that has been 
needed for a long time. 

New to the field, but not new 
to Pako, for it has been in daily 
use in the Pako finishing plant 
for several months and has more 
than fulfilled every expectation. 

The Barber Unit is a motor 
driven automatic timer that can 
be quickly and easily installed on 
any foot operated Pako Printer, 
converting that printer into a 
fast, automatically timed ma- 
chine, simple to operate and accu- 
rate on exposure. Any number of 
prints may be made from the 
same negative . . . each exactly 
like the others. 

Special features we would call 
to your attention are: 

Simplicity. It has few moving 
parts. The mechanism is not com- 
plicated. 

Speed. It has ample speed con- 
sistent with good quality prints. 

Ease of Operation. Just a touch of the operating button lowers and raises 
the platen, and automatically switches the lights on and ol~f. 

Variable Exposure. Speeds of exposure varying from a fraction of a sec- 
ond to a period as long as desired are possible through the use of the control 
dial conveniently located on the front of the printer at the operator's hand. 

Light Source. The voliune of light is always constant regardless of the 
length of exposure. 

In the Pako finishing plant it has been noted that the Barber Automatic 
Unit really conserves the operator's energy, increases the hourly production, 
decreases waste percentage and gives uniformity of exposure. 




Price, exclusive of printer, is 

$375.00 



[ Terms if ivanted ] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



-^ 



A Good Style to Know 




L 



" THC r%OY " 

Even in the showing of medium priced work style in mounters 
should be a factor. A new mounter is better advertising than the 
same style or "general cut" from season to season. 
In the Troy we offer a new and novel effect — it will make your 
moderately priced work' look better value than ever — and in 
keeping with the latest fashion trend. 

In all standard sizes from 3x4 to 8x10 
Price range— $6.50 to $19.50 per 100 

Colors — Greyrlend ^ Neutralrlend 

Sample for ten cents, and we will include 
sample of the Review — the companion line 
for horizontal pictures. A fine combination 
to feature this season. 

Sample Offer F-79 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[23 



er r y s 











/ -■ ■ , •, 











^v Himself 



Comer 



When I showed up for work on 
Monday, the shipping clerk looked 
at me and said — (jet busy! Here it 
is Monday, tomorrow will be Tues- 
day and the next day Wednesday. 
Half the week gone and nothing 
done yet. 

So hercs my work — a lot of stuff 
you shouldnt know. 

There are two genders — mascu- 
line and feminine. The masculines are 
divided into temperate and intemper- 
ate and the feminines into frigid and 
torrid. 

Every night, after 5, San Francisco 
has a big rushin' population. 

In every locomotive factory they 
have at least one big boiler. Thats to 
make the locomotive tender. 
S 

A doctor makes his patients pay his 
calls. 

A barking dog never bites — while 
he's barking. 

One way to have a quiet smoke 
is to remove the cigar band. 

There are usually more than 2 
seeds to a pear. 



Half a doughnut has more nourish- 
r.i?nt than the hole. 

A good sprinkling of pepper at the 
table will make everyone cougny. 
^< 
Artichokes never growl after dark. 

A monolog is a argument between 
a woman and her husband. 
..^ 

Many a man's better half has sep- 
arated him from his last quarter. 

An Indian reservation consists of a 
mile of land for every five square 
Indians. 

The best way to keep milk from 
souring is to keep it in the cow. 

Ambiguous means having two wives 
and not being able to get rid of one 

of them. 

,^« 
You can park your Austin cars next 
to a fire hydrant. That's because the 
fire engines can straddle them. 

You can water a horse, but you 
can't milk a cat. 

If all the hot dogs sold on Sunday 
were placed end to end — that would 
be a lot of baloney, just like this page. 

Jerr\'. 



Courtesy of 

Universal Pictures 

Corporation 




Luminosity Malces 
the Portrait Vivid 

►Since the earliest days of art 
— long before photography 
was born — luminosity in the 
representation has been a pri- 
mary aim. For luminosity 
means reality, life. 

The brilliant richness and 
depth of prints from Agfa Por- 
trait Film negatives is by no 



means an accident. For the 
luminosity which produces 
this effect is built into the Agfa 
Portrait Film emulsion. 

Agfa Portrait Film is now 
obtainable in both regular and 
panchromatic. 



or 




PORTRAIT 



i^i/ 



AGFA ANSCO OF BIIVGHAMTOIV 



IV 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[25 



-4- 



Eastman Gift To 
Stockholm 

George Eastman has given more 
than $75,000,000 to philanthropies. 
Preceding each of his gifts went a 
long period of secret investigation and 
discussion. His announcements have 
always struck the staff of his East- 
man Kodak Co. "as unexpectedly as 
lightning." Last week Eastman light- 
ning struck again, this time in Swe- 
den. Mr. Eastman gave Stockholm 
$1,000,000 to build a model dental 
dispensary and clinic. 

The Stockholm dental clinic will 
be Mr. Eastman's fourth institution 
of the sort. First and model for the 
others is at Rochester, N. Y., his home 
town, recipient of more than half his 
philanthropies. The Rochester Dental 
Dispensary was started in 1917, under 
direction of Dr. H. J. Burkhart. Dr. 
Burkhart, who has Mr. Eastman's un- 
qualified trust, arranged the organi- 
zation of the other two Eastman 
dental institutions — at London and 
Rome. He is to buy all their equip- 
ment, approve the appointments of 
their directors, superintend their regi- 
men. Last week he sailed with his 
wife and stepdaughter to attend the 
dedication of London's Eastman Den- 
tal Clinic, perhaps also the ground- 
breaking for the Rome dispensary. 

At Rochester last week it was said 
— Mr. Eastman's philanthropic se- 
cretiveness prevented authentic an- 
nouncement — that Mr. Eastman has 
in mind the creation of similar dental 
institutions in other parts of the 
world. If Dr. Burkhart goes from 
Rome to any of the Balkan countries 
or to Russia, human teeth in those 
regions are likely to benefit by $1,- 
000,000 or so. 

Mr. Eastman's public gifts all have 



had a peculiarly personal touch. For 
example, the London dental dispen- 
sary was the result of Mr. Eastman 
and Dr. Burkhart talking with Sir 
Albert Levy, English tobacconist, and 
Lord George Allardice Riddell, news- 
paperman. Signor Giacomo De Mar- 
tini, Italian Ambassador at Washing- 
ton, and Professor Amadeo Perna, 
foremost Italian dentist and a deputy 
in the Italian Parliament, interested 
the Rochester man in the needs of the 
Romans. Two years ago two sons of 
Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf of Swe- 
den, Prince Gustaf Adolf and Prince 
Sigvard, visited Mr. Eastman in 
Rochester. A few months later Mr. 
Eastman instructed Nils Bouveng, 
Eastman Kodak Co. representative in 
Europe and a native of Stockholm, to 
escort Dr. Burkhart on an inspection 
of dental facilities in Sweden, Nor- 
way, Denmark. [7^////f.] 

They Can't Be Hurried 

To anticipate the flood of orders 
(mostly of the rush variety), for 
mountings, we have installed an addi- 
tional embossing press. While this 
will help keep pace with the orders 
for embossing, there is one condition 
over which we have no control, which 
is the real "bottleneck" of the em- 
bossing service. 

As you probably know, each folder 
is embossed individually, and a heavy 
grade of ink is required. This ink 
must dry naturally, and the drying 
time is practically the delivery time. 
Some folders absorb more ink than 
others, and naturally dry quicker and 
although we are prepared to speed up 
the slow drying folders with heat, 
they can't be hurried to any appre- 
ciable degree. 



26 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



-4- 



Beattie's Marguerite Hi-Lite 

and 

Shadoleaf Slides 

(Patents Pending) 

Background shadow composi- 
tions of Manzanita, grease wood 
and chaparral of the deserts, pro- 
jected onto plain grounds by 
means of a spotlight, have long 
been familiar to those in attend- 
ance at the conventions and who 
have watched Beattie's demon- 
strations. Very interesting when 
done by a man who has for years 
played with that kind of thing, 
but impractical for others in the 
regular run of business. 

Now we have found a way to 
simplify the projection of back- 
ground designs and to make 
them far more beautiful than by 
any other method, and exceed- 
ingl}' practical for anyone who 
can "read" a lighting. 

Negatives are made of care- 
fully arranged compositions of 
the dwarfed and gnarly growths 
made picturesque by the heat and 
drouth of the deserts. From these 

Beanie's Marguerite Hi-Lite and cu^'.^'^'r ^Jif. /'^"'/"'^ Beattie's 

Shadoleaf Slides bhadoleaf Slides for use with 

the Marguerite Hi-Lite. The shrubs and objects 
selected for this purpose are so arranged that 
a great variety of compositions and effects can 
be had with a single slide, with lines and 
curves that can be made to harmonize with the 
general composition. 

The Marguerite Hi-Lite is a 12 and 25 am- 
pere arc spotlight of the highest class, primarily 
intended for background projection, but suitable 
for all other spotlight purposes. The price is 
$125.00, including the slides and stencils here- 
tofore supplied, and now the Shadoleaf Mod- 
ernistic Slide No. 1 — shown herewith — at no 
additional charge. Slides now available at $7.50 
each include the following: No. 1 Modernistic- 
Foliage; No. 2 California Pepper; No. 3 Desert 
Chaparral; No. 4 Desert Manzanita; No. 5 
Death Valley Smoke Tree. 

Projection frame to fit any Hi-Lite, with sten- 
cils and one Shadoleaf Slide, $25.00. Full direc- 
tions and diagrams furnished. 

Sold by HiRSCH & Kaye. Further particulars 
from Beattie's Hollywood Hi-Lite Company, 
6548 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Calif. 

Copyrighted, 1930, B.H.H. Co. 

Evelyn Peirce, (if H(ilhv,(i(iJ (hn,ial 
lightijii/ by an Odita Mo<li i rm/u 
ground from a Mai t/ueiite Ht-Lite and 
Shadoleaf Slide. 





-J- 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[27 



Service That Doesn't 
Show 

We read in Scripture that a man can- 
not live by bread alone, and we might 
add, a photographer cannot live by 
supplies alone. Your stock house is 
more than a distributing center for 
the supplies you may purchase. The 
mere assembly of an order and ship- 
ping it is a minor part of that some- 
thing bigger, which justifies a slogan, 
"Your logical source of suply." 

Shelf space is meaningless unless 
trained people are available to know 
what you are going to order, often 
before you yourself know. Trained 
order clerks are required, for fre- 
quently you do not mean just what 
you tell us, or overlook essential in- 
formation, and only skilled people can 
read between the lines. 

Service sums up many activities, 
and one form of service that we give 
and is usually overlooked, is the reg- 
istration of applicants for studio work. 
Just who originally put the stock 
house in the employment field is diffi- 
cult to say, but he (or she) started 
something. This year there have been 
more than the usual registrations, and 
five, six and more a day has been the 
rule. Strange to say, practically all 
applicants really expect us to have a 
good job waiting for them. 

To interview and register the ap- 
plicants, reply to phone and letter in- 
quiries, and take care of the Service 
Desk often requires hours of one 
man's time a day. We should also add 
the service extended to those who wish 
to sell or buy a studio, find a location, 
and other forms of strictly personal 
service, and you'll agree that such 
service, for your convenience, makes 
HiRSCH & Kaye "your logical source 
of supply." 



Desirable Books 

^^ Studio Portrait Ijighting" 

By Herbert Lambert, F.R.P.S. 
Clear, practical, authoritative dis- 
cussion of both the artistic and the 
technical problems confronting any 
photographer who does portrait work 
at all. Writing from his long and dis- 
tinguished experience, Mr. Lambert 
discusses both method and equipment, 
what to do and the ways of doing it. 
Particularly helpful and interesting 
are a number of beautifully repro- 
duced photographs, each accompanied 
by a diagram showing exactly how the 
lighting was arranged. 

90 pp., 35 plates, 53 figures and 
diagrams. $4.50. 

''Photography : Theory 
and Practice" 

Edited by George E. Brown 
This is a translation of the French 
work "La Technique Photograph- 
ique," which is recognized as the best 
French work on the subject. The 
English translation will take its place 
at once as the standard work on the 
technique of photography. The book 
will, of course, be of greatest prac- 
tical value to amateur and profes- 
sional photographers, but also contains 
much of importance to anyone con- 
cerned with the use of photography 
for various industrial processes. 

"The Complete Press 
Photographer" 

By Bell R. Bell 

("Focal Plane") of the "British Journal' 

of Photography" 

Pictures with real news value and 
how to obtain and sell them. 

188 pp., 45 illustrations, $2.50. 

HiRSCH & Kaye 



^- 



28 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



GREETING CARD MASKS 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



^^^^S^fi^^ , 








^^ 








J.-st-'a. t/ffe SHoS-ip-io' 




! 


e>CW5<.6....o-^„Vc 




— - i^i-je* 


g\'^?<rj,aW,rrj.i2«,i5fl 


>'^ 


^^^Si^^g^>"' 







Style II2-C 

2 V^ -inch opening 

for 

4x6 paper. 

Price $5.00. 



Style 106-B 

2 ^^x3l^ -in. opening 

for 

4x6 paper. 

Price $5.00. 



£J red ii'>_g^ 



a coru Ulerrn Ghnstinat qii6 
tin brightness of a fjopyj Xeoi 5»>r 




Papers suggested for use with Greeting Card Masks — 
Metallon — in Gold or Silver; 

MoNOKROiM — in Rose, Green, Blue or Olive. All four 
colors in Plat Lustre Surface; Rose and Green also in 
Silk surface. 

Order masks and papers from 
HiRSCH & Kaye 



THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 



[ 29 



Beattie's Hollywood Flood-Lites 

»»»^)->-^»»»»ODETA & NORMA »»> >> > >>>>>>> ^m> 



In these new Flood-Lites 
control of the hghting is al- 
most automatic. More com- 
pletely diffused than ever 
before, little adjustment is 
required to produce perfect 
negatives. A far cry indeed 
from something "just as 
good." 

The new drapery screen 
(patents pending) controls 
the lighting better and in a 
fraction of the time required 
in the old way, and leaves 
the deflectors free to serve 
their own particular purpose. 
Eliminating many of the re- 
toucher's troubles, this new 
screen speeds up the output 
and adds to the sales value 
of the proofs. 

In these new Flood-Lites 
tumbler switches place con- 
trol of speed within arm's 
length of the operator. The new solid rubber cable on the Odetta is the ulti- 
mate in flexibility — and cleanliness. 

Developed through long years of constant negative making in our studio 
maintained for research, these Lites differ from shop designed lights as day 
from night. More heavily constructed of bronze, brass and auto body steel, 
the Lites are giving years of service without attention. Higher cost of ma- 
terials is justified in lasting satisfaction to the studio. 

Compare these Lites with all else the market has to offer — then see if 
you can be satisfied with less. 




-> >>>> > >>> > >^ 



•>»»^ 



Carried in stock by 
HiRSCH & Kaye 



501 THE FOCUS FOR NOVEMBER • 1930 

_J _ ■ ^ 



VELTURA 



qphe new DEFENDER 
A paper for warm-toned 
portrait prints. 

Brilliantly combines pro- 
jection speed and contact 
portrait scale. 

A different paper, with a 
widened field of utility that 
will be understood and ap- 
preciated on first trial. 



Defender Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




Warm Toned Enlargements 
By Direct Development 

Vitava Opal, the outstanding success oi the year, is 
gaining friends as fast as it can be demonstrated. It's 
fast enough for enlarging — is equally suitable for con- 
tact printing and produces marvelous sepia tones in the 
new economical and long lived Gold Toning Bath. 

You will need Vitava Opal for Christmas portraits 
and now is the time to become familiar with this fine 
new paper. 

Opal is supplied in six grades — I], Semi-matte, and 
C, Matte, cream white; G, Fine grained lustre, and H, 
Fine grained matte, natural white; P, Fine grained 
lustre, and Q^, Fine grained matte, old ivory. All are 
double weight papers priced the same as double weight 
Vitava Rapid Black. Order now from your dealer. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Non- 
color- 
Sensitive 
Film 



Eastman 

Panchromatic 

Film 





iin <mmn«^-j^mmm 




CHARLES T. HOLf"^ 




^ 



A few years ago the above comparison could not have 
been made. Today, any commercial photographer 
who uses Eastman Panchromatic Film can show you 
equally remarkable results. 

It's just a matter of using material that is highly 
sensitive to red and green. It improves everyday re- 
sults and opens an unlimited field of new business to 
the commercial photographer — makes possible the cor- 
rect reproduction of any object regardless of its color. 

Eastman Portrait, Commercial or Process Pan- 
chromatic Film, at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



f ^jM^!^^;MiS^^^^zmxm^J^riJzMT$^ZMiSr^ZM^r^ 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 




^^s^^^^^ms^^^^^^^^d 




Portrait by Leo W. Falls, 
OrlandO/ Fla. 



Can 

a paper 

be too 

good? 



A CHARMING subject that 
tugs at your heartstrings/ 
a properly adoring parent/ a 
thoroughly competent camera 
man with the deftness of a fine 
technician/ a good film/ — all re- 
sulting in a negative \A/hich is 
truly a work of art. And then 
■ — the choice of paper. 

Can any paper be too good 
for such a job — for any job 
that a photographer wants to 
be known by ? 



Our answer is No — and 
that fine emulsion quality is 
accordingly/ at all timeS/ our 
paramount duty to photograph- 
ers in the manufacture of — • 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPERS 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N 



y. 



THE FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography by HiRSCH & Kaye 

239 Cirant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



OCTOBER, 1930 



No. 10 




Her diversion 
is biff 



IN THE PROFESSION 

VV H E N E \' E R 

there is a con- 
vention or re- 
gional meeting 
of photograph- 
ers, there is one 
person sure to 
be present. As 
owner of "Cam- 
era Craft," Ida 
M. Reed is 
known to pho- 
tographers on 
the Pacific Coast, as well as in east- 
ern states, for her loyalty to the pro- 
fession. 

Miss Reed is a New Englander, 
a native of Maine. But she received 
her business training in California, 
and in 1925 purchased "Camera 
Craft." The change in ownership 
showed noticeable results in short 
time. Only recently, the cover design 
of the magazine was redesigned to 
keep in step with modern ideas. 
"Camera Craft" is too well known to 
Focus readers to require further com- 
ment. 

Perhaps you already know what has 
just been said about Miss Reed, but 
wait — busy as she is, with her pub- 
lication and photography in general, 
she finds time to pursue another ac- 
tivity that is her chief diversion. (We 
almost said hobbj^) Do you know that 
Ida M. Reed is president of the Cali- 



fornia Federation of Women's Clubs 
of California, a past president of the 
Professional and Business Woman's 
Club of San Francisco, and one of the 
most active workers in behalf of 
women, in California? Her diversion 
is a big undertaking in itself and 
at the last convention of the Fed- 
eration in September, Miss Reed was 
re-elected president. 

We should also mention that Miss 
Reed is a director of the S. F. Ad- 
Club, a position that many a mere 
man finds a heavy task. Hobby? Cer- 
tainly — she likes golf, the real game, 
not pee-wee. But as associates in the 
photographic profession, we like to 
think of Miss Reed as an able adviser 
to photographers, either individually 
or collectively in a convention. 

The man who lacks faith in other 
men loses his best chances to work and 
gradually undermines his own power 
and his own character. We do not 
realize to what extent others judge us 
by our beliefs. But we are in fact 
judged in that way; and it is right 
that we should be judged in that way. 
The man who is cynical, whether 
about women or business or politics, 
is assumed to be immoral in his rela- 
tions to women or business or politics. 
The man who has faith in the integ- 
rity of others in the face of irrespon- 
sible accusations is assumed to have 
the confidence in others' goodness be- 
cause he is a good man himself. 

— President Hadlev. 



4] 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1 f) 3 




Our Salesmen Tell Us 



Arnold Williams, formerly with 
Yosemite Park & Curry Company, 
Yosemite, is now with Frederick & 
Burkett, Sacramento. Mr. Williams 
has at various times been with the 
several Park photographers, Boj^sen, 
Best, and others. 

C. R. Von der Heiden has opened 
a studio at 2122 Union Street, San 
Francisco. He is well known among 
the local photographers, having been 
a camera man in the Moore & Clark 
and other studios. 

Daniel Freeman of Monterey 
throws a mean game of horseshoes. Aa 
evidence we recite a recent experience 
of the writer, who came out the small 
end of the horn in competition. Score 
as we remember it was 21 to 6 — and 
we thought we were good. 

Miss Jean Burton has purchased 
the Peterson Studio at San Mateo. 
We pi"ophesy that she will like the 
community and they in turn the indi- 
vidualistic touch of her camera studies. 

J. M. Epstein, who has for some 
time been located at 560 Sutter Street, 
has moved to larger and more conven- 
iently equipped quarters at 406 Sut- 
ter Street. 



A great bereavement has fallen 
upon our good friend, W. F. Henry 
of Vallejo, whose w^ife passed away on 
the morning of October first. May 
every consolation be given him in his 
gi"eat loss. 

Paul Hanson of Palo Alto re- 
cently received a pleasant assignment 
from the White House to photograph 
Mrs. Hoover's dogs at her Palo Alto 
home. After the work w^as completed 
a personal letter followed from the 
first lady of the land telling of her 
delight with the pictures. 

Fred Hartsook, probably the best 
know^n photographer in California, 
died of heart failure on Sept. 30. He 
was 54 years of age and during the 
past 20 years was engaged in various 
activities, simultaneous with his chain 
of studios. 

Miss Marie Hartsook, a close 
relative of the late Fred Hartsook, 
has been for several years past suc- 
cessfully conducting her own studio 
in San Francisco. Recently she re- 
moved to 179 O'Farrell Street, where 
a fully equipped studio, modern in 
every respect, is established. Miss 
Hartsook, with the able assistance of 
her brother, cndeax ors to maintain the 
Hartsook (i\ialit\' of worknianslu'p . 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[5 




A Suggestion to 
Santa Clans 

A Practical Gift For the Children 

Believe it or not — a practical movie 
projector at popular prices for chil- 
dren's use is now available. Kodatoy, 
as the new device is called, is a sen- 
sational product of the Eastman Ko- 
dak Co. The projector is made of 
heavy gauge metal, nicely finished, 
and the capacity is 100 feet of 16 mm. 
film. The shutter is of the three blade 
type and the efficient take up mechan- 
ism, quickly understood and easily op- 
erated, insures freedom from tearing 
the film. 

The illumination is all you could 
ask for. The lamp is an ordinary auto- 
mobile headlight globe that receives 
current through a 6-volt transformer 
built into the projector. Film is re- 
wound by changing the crank to the 
upper reel. A concealed fly wheel gives 
uniform motion to the mechanism, 
which requires no effort to operate. 

For a screen, a miniature theatre 
stage is provided. Numerous reels of 
16 mm. are available for projection, 
in lengths of 100 feet and less. The 
price of the shortest reels is onlv 30 
cents. 

And now the price — 

The complete projector and little 



theatre is ofifered at only $12.00 net. 
A delightful toy, but a practical one. 
Surely you know of someone who 
would like to have his or her own 
projector? 

Here is an excellent addition to 
your line of cameras and film. We 
have an attractive resale proposition to 
offer if you will write for it. 

Order today from Hirsch 'd Kaye. 

.^« ^ 
Christmas Cards 

A Suggestion 

Every photographer has (or should 
have) one or more masks suitable for 
Christmas and New Year Greeting 
cards. When you make the prints 
from that roll of film left with you 
for finishing, make a greeting card 
from a suitable negative. Give it to 
your customer after you explain how 
you can make greeting cards of dis- 
tinctly personal nature, from his own 
negatives. You will stimulate more 
business, and make a friend because of 
the gift and the suggestion. 

The same idea can be applied to 
portrait sittings. Remind your cus- 
tomers that their friends can buy any- 
thing they give them, except their 
photographs and these personal greet- 
ing cards cannot be purchased by any- 
one except the owner of the negatives. 

Individual papers for individual 
cards are available. Here are but a 
few: Defender Monokrom, in four 
colors, !Maroquin and Silk in two 
colors and Metallon in gold or silver. 
A catalog of masks sent on request. 

When customers say, "Develop and 
print this roll," do you ask, "Two 
of each?" It's twice as easy for cus- 
tomers to say y^'^ as No, and the re- 
sults are twice as profitable for you. 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-^ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 



Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact quality. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlar-ging paper for use where speed and 
quality are of equal importance. 

The Gev^aert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
variety of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in any of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest quality. 



Descriptive Catalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

413-421 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicago, III. Toronto, Cati. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH flC KAYE, 
San Francisco 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[7 



Cooper Hewitt's Latest 
Product 

A Practicable, Portable 
M Tube Outfit 
Photographers will be interested in 
another new product of the General 
Electric Vapor Lamp Company, as 
the Cooper Hewitt branch is now 
called. An \l tube is housed in an 
unique reflector, which also serves as 
a practical carrying case. The resist- 
ance is self-contained and is quickly 
attached to the tbue. A tripod, ad- 
justable as to height, gives elevation 
to the tube within a range of 3 to 6 
feet from the floor. A descriptive and 
illustrated leaflet sent on request. 
Here are the specifications : 

cooper HEWITT 

Portable Photographic Outfit 
In New Gray Finish 

Light Source: Standard Cooper 
Hewitt \l shaped tube. 

Wattage: 450 watts, alternating 
current. 

Rating: 385 watts, direct current. 

Adjustments: Reflector designed as 
carrying case. Doors serve to control 
direction of light. Reflector can be 
tilted from vertical to 45°. Height 
adjustable from 3' to 6'. 

Weight : Approximately 45 pounds. 

Price: Direct current, $110.00; al- 
ternating current, $125.00. (Prices 
f.o.b. factory.) 

Place your order with Hirsch & 
Kaye. 

No. P. A. A. Convention 
in 1931 
Information has come to us that 
there will be no P. A. A. (national) 
convention next year. This is largely 
due to lack of attendance in propor- 
tion to actual and potential member- 



ship and the increasing cost of con- 
ventions. It is quite likely that 
bi-annual or tri-annual conventions 
will attract more interest, especially 
since every two or three years sufl[i- 
cient new devices and methods have 
been announced to ol¥er entire change 
of program and exhibit. 

However, the P.I. P. A. (Western) 
convention will be held in the fall of 
1931, according to schedule, at Sac- 
ramento. 

The Front Page 

The unattractive visitor on the front 
page was photographed by Henry 
Sackrider, Marysville. Needless to 
say, it was not a studio appointment, 
but one of those "at home" pictures. 
Mr. Sackrider recently made an ex- 
tensive set of pictures, movie and still, 
of reptiles and the work w-as interest- 
ing, to say the least. To judge by the 
expression on the snake, we dare say 
it did not care to be photographed. 
Had it only known that its picture 
would appear on the front page of 
The Focus, it might have posed 
more willinglv. Who knows? 

It's part of nature, human. 

To be ahvays frettin, fu/nin'. 
And to leant to wander hither, yon 
and thence. 
And most every youthful feller. 
Like a cow, is prone to beller 
For the grass that grows on 
t'other side the fence. 

H. M. Railsback. 
(^ (^ 
Cameras sold at Christmas assure a 
new year of new film and finishing 
business. It's a true case of eating your 
cake (profits from the camera sale) 
and having it too (continued profits 
from the sale of film and finishing). 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



A Modernized "Plain" Easel 



£__, 




"THE VIRGINIAN" 

Even the so called plain easel for the conservatively inclined can 
be modernized — 3'et still retain that necessary quiet richness. 

In the ViRGixiAX we offer an easel meeting these requirements. 
The whole effect — stocks — design and colorings speak subdued- 
ness — yet has todav's fashion look. 

This is a so-called oversize easel — generous margins around 
portrait. 

(jolors — Greytone & Nel'tralrlexd 
In all standard sizes from 3x4 to 7x9^ 
Price range — $7.00 to $18.00 per 100 

Samples of both colors for fifteen cents. Al- 
most all sales counters can make use of this 
quiet, modern looking easel. 

Sample Offer F-89 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



THE FOCI'S FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[9 



r r y s 




By Himself 



Comer 



1 just discovered Im being gypped 
in my pay. Will Rogers gets a million 
a year for being funny and Mr. 
Hoover gets 75 grand for being seri- 
ous. I get, — but why bring that up? 

In Illinois the barbers have to pass 
an examination before they can cut 
people's throats, but photographers 
don't need to. They only work on 
each other. 

It must be awkward to be absent 
minded. I seen a letter in the office 
where a customer said he had to go 
hack to the mountains for his lungs. 

Many an opticians daughter has 
made a spectacle of herself after get- 
ting two glasses. 

S 

There's been all kinds of automo- 
biles named after presidents — Grant, 
Cleveland, Roosevelt and Lincoln. 
Now lets have a Coolidge, the Silent 
Six. 

A cheap skate soon breaks the ice. 

I had a girl named Nina 
Her father's name was Klok 
So every time I had a date 
Twas always Nina Klok. 

They say love makes the world go 
round. My first cigarette did the same 
thing. 



Early to bed 
Early to rise 
Was written, I think, 
For soft headed guys. 

Heres an idea for Taprell Loomis, 
what put there ad next to my page 
every month. They got their mounts 
named after different cities and if 
theyd call one The Pineapple, I bet 
it would go over with a bang. 

2 can live as cheap as one — can 
play golf. 

J« 

My girl is so anxious to get into 
the movies that she keeps film on her 
teeth. 

Hear about Amos 'n Andy's stop- 
ping their new picture? 

Yeah — Pepsodent destroyed the 
film. 

A friend of mine has an Austin. 
I borrowed it to take my gir for a 
ride. 

She says to me, Jerry — you can kiss 
me if you want, we're in a tunnel. 

I sa^'s — don't you believe it, we're 
under a truck. 

^^ 
If you keep on your toes you won't 
run down at the heel. 

Use Putz Pomade twice a day — 
See your stock house twice a year. 



10] 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



Professional Service 



-r 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEN GATE AVEXUE 

San Francisco 

Room 4-20 Phone PRospect 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

CarefuU)) Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

Matilda S. Ransdell 

3100 Fulton Street 
BAyview 4584 San Francisco 



GEORGE A. WEEDEN 

Artist 

Producer of 

Fine Crayons • Water Colors • Pastels 

Oil Paintings • Ivory Miniatures 

Air Brush Work 

711-47th Ave., San Francisco 

SKvline 2759 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service. Work Guar- 
anteed. 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 

86 Third Street San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artistically done in real oils or 
tints — from one to quantities. 

RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do \our retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

EVER READY SERVICE 



Phone GRavstoiie 7912 



12S5 Geary Street 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[11 



No Duty on U. S. Made 
Film Exposed Abroad 

The new tariff may have caused a 
difference of opinion among amateur 
movie makers as citizens, but there 
can be no question of its benefit to 
them as movie makers who travel 
abroad. Under the terms of the act 
recently passed, amateur motion pic- 
ture film taken abroad and exposed 
in foreign countries may be brought 
into the United States duty free, 
whether developed or not, provided 
the films are of American manufac- 
ture and provided they are not to be 
used for commercial purposes. 

This has not been the case hereto- 
fore, and amateur movie makers have 
consequently been more or less an- 
noyed because strict interpretation of 
the law held their films subject to 
comparatively heavy duty. At the 
time when the Fordney-Macomber 
tariff bill was passed (1922) 16-mm. 
film and the specifically amateur 
equipment that is now in such wide 
use had not yet been offered to the 
public. Virtually the only motion pic- 
ture film imported was film of stan- 
dard width for comercial use in this 
country. 

The present Congress, taking cog- 
nizance of the case of the amateur 
cinematographers, has left films for 
commercial purposes still dutiable but 
has provided free entry for amateurs' 
motion picture films, with the stipula- 
tions that proof shall be made that the 
films be of American manufacture and 
that they shall not be used for com- 
mercial purposes. 

This exemption from duty marks 
the successful culmination of three 
years' intensive effort on the part of 
the Amateur Cinema League to bring 
about such a result. 



A notice sent by the Amateur Cin- 
ema League to its members remarks 
that, pending the issuance of customs 
regulations based upon the new tariff 
act, unofficial information indicates 
"Movie amateurs presenting films for 
entrance into the L^nited States will 
be well advised to enter these films 
upon their baggage declaration itself, 
the phrase, 'the above-listed films are 
intended for purely personal use and 
are not to be used for commercial 
purposes.' If any question should 
arise, reference should be invited to 
paragraph 1615 of the Tariff Act of 
1930." 

The notice further points out that, 
pending the establishment of more 
definite means for identifying films 
as of American manufacture, "L^nited 
States Customs authorities will prob- 
ably base decisions upon their very 
wide knowledge of origins of manu- 
factured products." 

^ S 
Stolen Lens 

One of our customers informs us 
of the theft of a Taylor-Hobson 
Cooke lens. Series H, of 14^^ focus. 
The serial number of the lens is No. 
54364 and the lens is mounted in bar- 
rel. Should anyone offer this lens to 
you, get in touch with us at once. 

This reminds us that photographers 
are frequently approached by strang- 
ers with an offer to supply a photo- 
graphic accessory at a very reduced 
price. IVIore than likely, the person 
who makes the offer is not the actual 
owner of the equipment, and unless 
he can produce bill of sale or proof 
of ownership, it will be well to be 
cautious in matters of this kind, or 
you may be purchasing stolen eqvn'p- 
ment. 



_^.. 



12] 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



"Here is 
Your 

Sample of 
The Better 
Sulphite" 




The effects of too much, too little or 
impure Sulphite : 

1. An excess causes precipitation in the develop- 
ing solution. 

2. Insufficient Sulphite in fixing bath causes milk- 
iness. 

3. Impurities or too little sulphite will impair 
the keeping qualities of the developing solution. 

For detailed explanation of these facts send for 
our handbook "Chemistry of Photography." 



Rciuni This Couf^on^ 



MALLINCKRODT 

CHEMICAL 

WORKS 

A constructive force in the chemical 
industry since 1S67 



PROPERTIES 

1 • Does not cake. 

2 • Makes crystal 

clear solution. 

3 • Almu/s up to 

strenqth. 



St. Louis 
Philadelphia 



Montreal 
New York 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Second and Mallinckrodt Sts. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

I enclose 10c for a one-pound Sample of your 
better Photo Sulphite. 

□ Check if you want our handbook 

"Chemistry of Photography." 



Name ... 
.Iddrcss 
City 



State. 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[13 



N'eivco Flash Powder 

A standard, well-known product, used 
by those who want the best. Made 
of the finest grained material, to in- 
sure immediate and complete combus- 
tion. Produces an intense light. 

Newco Flash Powder is made in 
the following grades : 

Slow — for commercial work, where 
maximum detail is required. 

Universal — an all-round powder for 
portrait or commercial use, in pan or 
bag. 

Bag — for banquets and groups, 
made with Hash bag or cabinets (not 
to be used in open pan). This grade 
is quite noiseless. 

Special Fast — to be used only in 
open pan, to stop all action. 

Order a 2-oz. bottle, price $1.55, 
and gi\c it a trial. 

Iron Stands for X-Ray 
Tanks 

Focus readers whose negatives con- 
sist of X-Rays will be interested in 
stands that can now be supplied for 
Stoneware Tanks. The stands will 
raise the tanks 1 1 ^^ inches, a conven- 
ient working height. The price is 
$9.85. If you use the U. S. Stoneware 
X-Rav Tanks you will want a stand 
for each. 

How many? 

Identify Cattle by 
Photofjraphy 

A decidedly novel use of photography, 
by which registered cattle are identi- 
fied, has brought much business to 
many p'lotographers within the past 
few years. 

The work is secured through the 
various cattle breeders' associations. 
At one time the color markings on 



the animals were sketched by hand 
for reference purposes. A change to 
photography is taking place, because 
it is more accurate and easy to use. 

It is estimated that 175,000 cattle 
were photographed last year. The 
method is to make negatives of each 
animal, one of the right side and one 
of the left side. In one of the nega- 
tives the head should be turned 
slightly toward the camera so that the 
face markings show. 

Such photographs are often used by 

cattle breeders for advertising and 

selling purposes also. (Pathway.) 

^ S 

Photognipher Watches Ads 

For Customers 

The present trend to photography 
instead of drawings for advertising 
illustrations has not been overlooked 
by one Eastern commercial photog- 
rapher, who is rapidly increasing his 
business by watching carefully the ad- 
vertising pages of newspapers and 
magazines. 

When the photographer comes upon 
an advertisement in which drawings 
are used, he makes a photograph of 
the commodity illustrated and pre- 
sents it to the manufacturer as an 
example of the superiority of pho- 
tography over other art work. 

Very often this procedure results in 
orders for advertising photographs, 
particularly when the photograph sub- 
mitted carries with it some well writ- 
ten copy along the lines of the Inter- 
national Association's advertising — 
"Photographs Tell the Truth." 

It's easier to point than to ask . . . 
one reason why you sell more cigars 
cut of the case than ofif the shelf, 
(joods well displayed are usuallv bet- 
ter than half sold. 



14] 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



'^ 




Made in tlie Folloimng 
Popular Sizes 

No. 2 5^x 75^ 

No. 3 6^x 834 

No. 4 71^ X 91/ 

*No. 5 8^x10^ 

*No. 6 lO^A X 12^ 

*No. 7 I2K X 141/ 

*No. 8.. 10^x15 

No. 9 6^x 9^ 

*No. 10 71/^x11^ 

*No. 11 81^x11^ 

*No. 12 13 X 17^ 

No. 14 16 x20^ 

*Packed in cartons 



The New 

Ingento Photo Mailer - 

Has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gummed flap, making it possible 
to mail photos to foreign countries or send 
them by first-class mail when privacy or addi- 
tional safety is desired. 

The Ingento is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking 
photographs, drawings, sketches or any other valu- 
able matter when this mailer is used, as they are 
perfectly preserved by the double corrugated board 
which covers the photograph or drawing both front 
and back. The capacity of this mailer is greater than 
others and it is more quickly sealed. The various 
sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popu- 
lar up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios 
throughout the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
made 8^x11^ inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8x10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board: it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



containing fifty 

Manufactured by BuRKE & James, Inc.^ Chicago, Illinois 

Carried in Stock by Hirsch & Kaye 

SIZES FOR ANY NEED.'' PRICES NONE CAN MEET.' PROMPT SHIPMENTS.' 



Change in C. O. D. 
Postal Rules 



Effective Oct. 1, 1930, under 
a new postal regulation, pack- 
ages shipped C.O.D. via parcel 
post will be held only fifteen 
days, which will be the free time 
limit. 

After that date they will be 
returned to the shipper. 

Kindly make note of this, if 
you order your goods shipped 
Parcel Post C.O.D. 



Stop Waste ^ 

Reduce Labor, Expense 



Install STERLING 
Developing Tanks for 
Amateur Finishing, 
Commercial and Pro- 
fessional Work. Low 
Cost. Low Upkeep. 
Best Results. 




Made of the very finest porcelain enamel. 
Turns out enormous amount of work dai!\. 
Best by Test. Ask for Circular. 

Sterling Photo Mfc. Co. 
beaver falls, pa. 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[15 



-4- 



MARSHALL'S 
SMOKELESS 



Marshall's Smokeless 
■ — a practical means of 
taking flashlights without 
smoking out the customer 
— write for descriptive lit- 
erature. 



8 

Independent Virtues 

1. Smokeless, odorless and dustless 

2. High in illumination 

3. Plenty of speed 

4. Little noise 

5. Ready mixed 

6. Resists moisture 

7. Panchromatic quality 

8. Will operate speed guns 




MARSHALL'S 

SMOKELESS 




! S'Ozs. 



:M Pl-ASHLIGHT 
:j POWDER 

! I 'XANCHROMATIC 

I *o a marked d'spjen 

''S2 ATLANTIC AVKHUE 
BROOKLYN, N'. V. 



We Stock It 

HiRSCH & Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 




CO 



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18] 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



rn;ui!ij;i.l:>VJ:^dA.t.to) 



RE6. TRADE MARK 



FOR YOU 



Emulsions made and coated in the Hammer way have 
the characteristics every picture maker is searching for. 

Hammer has made it possible for your negatives to have 
strength and at the same time a softness that will produce 
prints with brilliancy and detail. 

Hammer supplies Special Brands for Special Work and 
will mail you free of charge a portfolio of prints showing 
results you may expect. 

Write for your portfolio today. 



HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



159 West 22nd St., 
New York City 



Ohio Ave. & Miami St. 
St. Louis 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievablv small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For sale by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



Do you have difficulty with scratches 
and cuts on the films in the rinsing 
tanks? When the strips wave in the 
tanks, the clips on the short strips 
may cut the longer strips next to 
them. This condition is brought about 
by improper water control, leading to 
excessive current around the outlet. 
The outlet should be larger than the 



intake, to avoid a "surge." Sometimes 
a wave-like motion is set up in the 
tank. Transmitted to the films, cuts 
and scratches are bound to result. 

The best solution is to allow the 
water to flow over the top and down 
the outside of the tank into the sink 
below, Little or no movement of the 
film will result. 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[19 



Things You Should Kmoiv^ 



CLEANLINESS 



Dust and dirt are ene- 
mies of good quality 
photographic work. A 
few particles of hypo, 
potassium ferri-cyanide, 
or sodium sulfide dust 
carelessly sifted into the 
developing room where 
they can settle on moist 
films or prints will 
cause an endless amount 
of trouble from spots. Whenever pos- 
sible all chemicals should be stored 
and mixed in a separate room from 
the developing, printing, or drying 
rooms. Keep the chemical containers 
closed when not in use. 

Scales and mixing vessels should 
be kept scrupulously clean. Separate 
wooden stirrers for each stock solu- 
tion, developer, and hardener are very 
useful, and each mixing vessel should 
be washed out after using. 

Chemical dust may arise from the 
following sources: (1), leakage from 
cans, barrels and kegs; (2) spilling 
of dry chemicals during handling; and 
(3) spilling of wet chemicals which 
subsequently crystallize on drying. 
Such dust frequently gets into the air 
ventilating system, when it invariably 
produces spots on films and prints. 

Typical spots caused by hypo and 
by ferricyanide are shown in Figures 
1 and 2 respectively. 

Care essential in the ivorkrooins 

In the developing and printing 
rooms it is even more important to 
handle the solutions with care. A fix- 




ing bath splashed on 
the floor will dry up 
and the hypo crystals, 
formed after being pid- 
verized by the feet, will 
get into the air of the 
room, settle and cause 
spots on the films. Par- 
ticles of dust on the 
negatives produce white 
spots on the prints. 
It is good practice 
to allow stock solutions to stand for 
a few hours after mixing and then to 
remove any scum by skimming the 
surface before use with a strip of blot- 
ter or a few layers of cheesecloth 
stretched over a wire frame. 

The floor of a mixing room should 
have a drain so that it may be flooded 
at least once a week to wash away 
any particles of chemical dust which 
may have accumulated. If there is no 
drain, the floor should be mopped fre- 
quently. 

Stone tanks can be sterilized by 
scrubbing the sides and bottom with 
solid calcium hypochlorite (bleaching 
powder) to which enough water has 
been added to form a paste. The tanks 
should then be washed out five or six 
times with clear water. 

The walls of wooden tanks should 
be scrubbed thoroughly with a x^we 
brush and then the tank should be 
filled with sodium hypochlorite solu- 
tion (one part hypochlorite solution 
to six parts of water) and allowed 
to stand over night. The tanks should 

[ Continued on Page 25 ] 



20 ] 
-^ 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



When Retouching use 

A. W. Faber's - 

The Finest Pencil Made 

17 degrees of hardness 
6 degrees for positive 
1 degree sepia 

Write your needs or tell our salesmen 




Minima Pocket Arc Lamp 

The Smallest, Lightest Arc Lamp Made 

Only ^Y''^ 

Suitable for all kinds of photographj^, including Portraiture, 
Groups, Interiors, Copying, etc. Extreme!}^ useful as an auxil- 
iary source of illumination. 

Gives a brilliant actinic light. Clean and safe in operation. 

Consumes only four amperes, and operates on ordinary 110 
volt current. 

Size closed 4^2x3^", weighs 8 ozs. A real pocket lamp. 

Complete with Rheostat, 5 pair extra carbons, 9 feet of cord, 
and all necessary connections. 

The least expensive arc lamp we have ever offered. 
Order one today from HiRSCH & KAYE 



^- 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[21 




The Presidential Siiilr, 
Mayflouier Hotel at 
Ifas/iiriffton. D. C, made 
liy Harris o Eiviiie/ 
ivitli the Jf'nllensak 
Series III f'elosli(/inat 
Hide .Ingle Lens 



Use a Wollensak Wide Angle Lens 
for Wide Angle Work 

The general misapprehension that one commercial lens 
serves all purposes is the cause of many failures, — Making 
photographs in confined spaces, for instance, requires a 
lens of short focus with special corrections for wide angle 
work — such corrections are incorporated in the Wollen- 
sak lenses 



Scries 1 1 1 Velostigmat Wide Angle /9.5 

and 
Series Ilia P^xtreme Wide Angle /12.5 

Allow us to send one of these splendid 
Wide Angle lenses to you on our 
regular thirty-day trial period. Your 
dealer will gladly procure it for you. 



^ 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

872 HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



Manufacturers of quality pliotographic lenses 
and shutters since 1899 



22] THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



-4^ 



Light! 




Instantaneous! 

Absolutely Safe! 

Positive Flash! 



Under Water! 
In Mines! 
In Rainy or Dry Weather! 






That, briefl}', is a description of the newest method of artificial 
lighting. The General Electric laboratories have produced a glass 
enclosed flashlight that looks like an ordinary Mazda lamp of 100- 
watt size. Inside the bulb is a thin foil of highly combustible material 
that is consumed in 1/100 of a second. The bulb has the usual threaded 
base found on all electric lamps. 

The bulb is not refillable, but the advantages are many. Think of 
photography under water, in rain or snow, in mines, magazines, air- 
planes and other areas closed to the usual flash exposure! 

Ignition is extremely simple. Any electric current from lj4 volts 
upward will ignite the bulb. A pocket flashlight will do it. 

Preliminary tests on comparative results of the flashlamp and pow- 
der show that a single flashlamp in a suitable reflector gives a pho- 
tographic illumination intensity equivalent to approximately fifteen 
to twenty grains of powder. These figures were obtained by actuallv 
measuring the densities of photographs taken of the same subject with 
both lamp and powder. 

Density measurements made in connection with colored objects 
shows that the photoflash lamp gives a fairly strong rendering in the 
orange-yellow region and that the light is extremely strong in the 
blue-violet region where photographic materials are most sensitive. 
The light is a little deficient in the extreme red and not so strong in 
the green. 

Photo Flash Bulbs 

Price each $ .40 

Price each, in lots of 50, a standard package 35 

Hand reflector, battery, igniter and handle 5.00 

Testrite Reflector and battery 3.75 



Place your order for a trial lot and be convinced 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[ 23 



Six Executives Buy Under- 
wood & Underwood 

Bert and Elmer Underwood, who in 
1882 founded Underwood & Under- 
wood, now the largest of the photo- 
graphic companies, announced recently 
the sale of control of the business to 
six of its executives. 

Ben D. Jennings, who has been 
president for a year and previously 
vice-president and general manager 
for five years, continues as president. 
C. T. Underwood, son of Elmer Un- 
derwood, continues as vice-president 
and secretary. L. E. Rubel, manager 
of the Washington Studios of the 
company, continues as vice-president 
and treasurer. Lejaren a' Hiller, illus- 
trator, and E. R. Underwood, son of 
Bert Underwood, continue as vice- 
presidents. The two other purchasers 
are Morris D. Behrend of New York 
and Leo G. Hessler of Washington. 

No change in management, opera- 
tion or policies is contemplated. 

Portrait work of the company is 
carried on in twenty-one cities in this 
country. Illustration studios for the 
making of photographic advertising 
illustrations are located in New 
York and Chicago. News department 
branches furnishing portraits and news 
pictures to newspapers and other pub- 
lications are in New York, Washing- 
ton and Chicago. The news depart- 
ment has nearly a thousand staff pho- 
tographers throughout the world. 

Bert and Elmer Underwood retired 
from active business five and a half 
years ago but have retained, and will 
continue, a financial interest. 

In the files of the company are 
more than 2,000,000 negatives, in- 
cluding portraits of virtually all the 
leaders in politics, finance, business 
and society from many countries and 



covering a period of thirty years; and 
news pictures showing the most im- 
portant news events from all over the 
world for more than forty years. 

The 45° Angle 

That's the name of a book you ouglit 
to have. It is a reprint of an article 
written and illustrated by Mr. J. W. 
Beattie for Bulletin of Photography, 
and is an excellent book in the use of 
spotlight in lighting. 

There are a limited number of cop- 
ies available. There is no charge, but 
act quickly and send us your request 
for a copy. 

Dividends 

Have you ever heard of anyone 
throwing away a dividend check? 

More often than not, the state- 
ments that you get every month carry 
a little clause something like this: 
"2%, 10 days — net 30 days." 

That's the dividend. Two per cent 
turned every month earns 24% per 
year. Only speculative investments pay 
you that return. Here's one that's 
safe and sure; take the discount, your 
money remains in the bank. And it's 
a nice profit — your dividend. . . . 

But don't take it unless you've 
earned it, by paying exactly on tlie 
date, not later. 

^ .*« 

New Aerial Photo Idea 

Announced 

A flying photographic laboratory is in 
prospect for the Chanute Field, Illi- 
nois flying school, according to a re- 
cent announcement. 

Experiments are being made with 
a high-wing monoplane in which it is 
planned to install a dark room and the 

[ Continued on Page 25 } 



24} THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



Listed at the Service Desk 



Are you looking for a Studio location? Is your Studio for 
Sale? Are you seeking competent help? 

All of these problems are answered in these columns. We have insuffi- 
cient space to list all the Studios offered for sale, and for the same reason 
are unable to give complete descriptions. If interested, get in touch with 
the HiRSCH & Kaye Service Desk. We'll be delighted to assist you. 
There is no charge for listing your business for sale in The Focus. 

Studios are available in these locations : 

California 

Anaheim Box 2247, The Focus Richmond Box 2226, The Focus 

Berkeley Box 2272, The Focus Salinas Box 2215, The Focus 

Hollywood Box 2248, The Focus San Francisco Box 2251, The Focus 

Jackson Box 2268, The Focus San Francisco Box 2231, The Focus 

Los Angeles Box 2211, The Focus San Francisco Box 2256, The Focus 

Madera Box 2228, The Focus San Francisco Box 2266, The Focus 

Monterey Box 2269, The Focus San Jose Box 2222, The Focus 

Oakland Box 2143, The Focus San Jose Box 2261, The Focus 

Oakland Box 2260, The Focus Santa Cruz Box 2249, The Focus 

Pismo Beach Box 2232, The Focus Santa Paula Box 2164, The Focus 

Redding Box 2258, The Focus Selma Box 2243, The Focus 

Oregon 

Ashland Box 2089, The Focus Freewater Box 2097, The Focus 

Baker '. Box 2087, The Focus Medford Box 2274, The Focus 

Bend Box 2209, The Focus Portland Box 2265, The Focus 

Washington 

Colville Box 2254, The Focus Seattle Box 2137, The Focus 

Concrete Box 2123, The Focus Spokane Box 2271, The Focus 

Olympia Box 2210, The Focus 

Nevada 
McGill Box 2095, The Focus Reno Box 2125, The Focus 

Utah 

Salt Lake City Box 2230, The Focus 

Arizona — New Mexico 

Kingman, Ariz Box 2263, The Focus Las Cruces, N. M..Box 2217, The Focus 

Morenci, Ariz Box 2255, The Focus 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER -1930 [25 



Fadis That Are Fadis ~ 

The importance of maintaining developing solutions at proper tem- 
perature cannot be overestimated. It's most essential. 

Sterling water- jacketed outfits \\'ith circulating vi^ater all about 
developing tanks insures proper temperature regulation both summer 
and winter. They prevent trouble and possible failure. They give 
operators confidence and assurance. 

Users of large capacity tanks are interested in knowing: 

Sterling tanks used as auxiliaries in slack season cut cost of operat- 
ing in half. The saving of solutions alone will more than pay for your 
outfit. No dead space for idle solutions. They are scientifically worked 
out, and are the most economical outfits in existence. Low cost. Low 
upkeep. Maximum dailv output. 

The 10 gallon 3x12x42 in. tanks will develop 450 to 500 rolls dailv. 

The 17 gallon 8x12x42 in. size 750 to 1000 rolls daily. 

The 24 gallon 11x12x46 in. size accommodates 30 Pako Hangers. 
Excellent for slack season. 

The Sterling System is the original system and has proven its 
superiority through over a decade of actual manufacture and use. 
Complete. Compact. Labor saving and eocnomical. 

Light in weight, easy to handle, neat and easy to clean. They can- 
not warp or lose their shape. Non absorbent, acid resistant. Durable. 

Remember: Sterling tank outfits are made for every phase of de- 
veloping work. Special sized tanks made to order on request. 

See pages 58, 59, 60 of thirteenth edition 
HiRSCH Q" Kaye Catalog, or write for illustrated circular 

Sterling Tanks are in stock at 

HIRSCH <^K AYE 



-=^ 



Cleanliness Mew Aerial Idea 

[ Continued from Pagt- 19 ] [ Continued from Page 3 ] 

be emptied out the next morning, necessary chemical and mechanical 

given another thorough scrubbing and equipment for developing pictures 

five or six washings before being used while the plane is in flight. The de- 

again. t'lils have not been completely worked 

A stock solution of hypochlorite is o^'^' ^^^ '^ is contemplated to secure 

prepared by making up a 4% solution "lo^^ture or rain from the clouds 

r 1 • 1 ui -^ J J J- while the plane is in flight and in this 

or calcumi hypochlorite and adding . r i • 

in<T/ 1- L I • -1 way obtain water for washing prints 

lOyfc sodium carbonate solution until . 



no more precipitate forms. The solu- 
tion is then allowed to stand until all 



during the process of development. 

In this way, observers or map tech- 
nicians would be able to take pictures 
the precipitate settles to the bottom ; ^^^^ develop them in the cabin of the 
the remaining liquid should then be plane and immediately obtain the 
drawn off for use as a stock solution. necessary data for military purposes. 



26 ] 



THE FOCI'S FOR OCTOBER • 1930 




K-10 Aerial Camera 

For vertical and oblique aerial photographs, 
or ground photography 

Construction : 

Sturdily constructed — aluminum body, stream lined to break wind re- 
sistance. 

Attractively finished in black crackled enamel and nickel. 

Specially designed grips are scientifically placed to permit holding camera 
steadily and to give proper balance when camera is used for oblique aerial 
or ground shots. 

Weight : Approximately 22 pounds when loaded with twenty-five ex- 
posure roll film. 

Measurements: Length 12^", width 10", height 133/^". 

Shutter: 

Focal plane type with high speed curtain operating in close proximity to 
the film, resulting in very high shutter efficiency. 

Shutter Speeds: 

l/50th part of a second mim'mum to 1 /220th of a second maxinuim. 

Operation : 

Two simple motions make the picture: a half turn of crank — a slight 
pressure on release. 

A single half turn of winding crank automatically' sets the sliuttci- ami 
moves film into position for next exposure. 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 [27 



A visible tally on outside of camera records number of exposures made 
on film. 

A shutter release lever is jjlaced convenient to rifiht hand grip and allows 
operation without changing grip. 

Entire back of camera easily remo\abIe to allow insertion or removal 
of roll film. Roll films are held in place by two knurled spool centers 
unscrewed from outside of camera. 

Finder: 

Direct vision box ty|H'. Out of the way when not in use. Snap button 
release brings finder into place. Rigidly held against wind pressure yet 
bends forward when in contact with clothes of operator. 

Spirit Level: 

An efficient spirit level of the "T" type is mounted on back of camera 
for use as guide in properly leveling camera. 

Lens : 

Anastigmat type. 

Focal length of 10". f.4.5 with Iris Diaphragm mounted in a specially 
designed focusing mount to permit using camera for ground as well as 
for aerial work. 

Distances of 8', 10', 12', 15', 25', 50'. 100' and Infinity are graduated 
on front of mount to assist in accurate focusing. 

Snap button holds lens rigidly at Infinity. 

Film : 

Roll. Panchromatic type — Regular or Hvpersensitized. 

Capacity : 

Twenty-five 5 x 7 exposures per roll. 

Loads or luiloads in daylight as simply as an ordinary hand camera. 

Field Case: 

Substantially built, leather covered, with lock and key. Cushioned to 
absorb shipping shocks and knocks to camera and is provided with pockets 
for carrying 4 25-exposure rolls. Dimensions: height. 16". width 16". depth 
14". Weight 16 lbs. 

Prices: 

K-10 Camera unit, list $495.00. 

Field Case, list $40.00. 

Film — Eastman Panchromatic type: Regular, $7.10 per roll of 25 — 5x7 
exposures. Hypersensitized. $1.25 net additional per roll of 25 — 5x7 ex- 
posures. 

This camera means new fields for you. Can he purchased 
from HiRSCII <o Kaye upon convenient monthly payments. 



28} THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER - 1930 

Satrap Metallon Papers in Gold and Silver 

The Latest Development ix Metallic Papers 

A NEW AND IMPROVED metallic paper which ppnnts any negative by 
contact or enlarging on a GOLD or SILJER base. Instead of the usual 
black image on a white base, you get a black image on a gold or silver base 
with gold or silver highlights. Remarkable and unusual effects are obtained 
in still life compositions, interiors, portraits, marine scenes, miniatures, 
silhouettes, greeting cards and gold and silver anniversary^ pictures. It is a 
paper unequaled in the photography of objects made of gold, silver, nickel, 
glass, steel and brass; can be used for photographing jewelry and furniture 
as well as 'for catalog work and general advertising. 

Prints made on Satrap Metallox or Metallox Silver are lasting 
and non-fading, and can be toned for color effects. 

The methods of handling, developing and fixing are the same as for 
ordinary fast gaslight papers. 

Prices in Gold or Sil-ver 

5x7 $1.00 per dozen $10.00 per gross 

8x10 2.25 per dozen 22.50 per gross 

11x14 4.00 per dozen 40.00 per gross 

Supplied only in glossy double weight stock 

This paper ivill be fou7id especially attractive for 

Christmas Greeting Cards and specialties 

Order today from HiRSCH o KayE 



Dry Mounting Press 




Ax' illustration and complete description of this useful accessory appears 
on Page 92 of the 13th edition H o K catalog. For years the press has 
sold for S90.00, hut as the copv for the catalog was prepared, and we 
checked the present price, our modesty got the best of us. We iust couldn't 
publish the present low price. 

But so many inquiries were received that it was left to the editor of this 
publication to break the news. So, here it is — $65.00 complete, or on terms 
as mentioned by Jerrv last month. 

Record this in your catalog, or better still, order a press today and you'll 
forget the price. 

Order today from HiRSCH & K.AVE 



THE FOCrS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



[ 29 



Bargains for the Photographer 




HALLDORSON STUDIO CABINET 

With 4 1500-watt Photo Blue Mazda 
lamps. An excellent lighting unit for 
individual figures or groups. Each lamp 
on its own switch. 
Bargain Price ^55.00 

8x10 STUDIO CAMERA 

with 5x7 back (no 8x10 back), on An- 
thony Scoville stand. Fitted with No. 8 
Packard shutter and lens hood. 
Bargain Price ^50.00 

ELWOOD STUDIO ENLARGER 

List $30.00 

Bargain Price ^21.50 

IMP FLASH GUN 

Bargain Price ^3.00 



STUDIO REFLECTOR 

Eastman. Page 39, H fc K catalog. 
Bargain Price ^18. TO 

F & S PRINTER 

Operated by foot treadle with lamps. 
Bargain Price ^27.S0 

ANSCO UNIVERSAL TRIPOD, ^15.00 

DUPLEX JR. TWIN ARC LAMP 

\\'ithout case or diffusing attachment. 
Bargain Price ^37.50 

DUPLEX JR. TWIN ARC LAMP 

Complete. 

Bargain Price ^42.50 

STONEWARE TANKS 

2— llK-xllK-x42 (24-gallon capacity). 
Bargain Price ^30.00 for the two 

PRINT WASHER 

Universal motor driven. 

Bargain Price ^10.00 

ANSCO VIEW CAMERA 

8x10 with 5x7 back. (No 8x10 back in- 
cluded.) Fine for long focus lens use. 
Includes case and one plate holder. 
Bargain Price ^35.00 

POCKET PHOTO MIRROR 
MACHINE 

Complete with a liberal supply of mir- 
rors, backs, celluloid and easel handles. 
An excellent novelty. Very easily op- 
erated. Write for circular and a sample 
mirror. 

Bargain price (very reasonable) on ap- 
plication. 



No. 123 Photo Mailers 4^ x 7 

No. 234 " " Sy2xn% 

No. 240 " " 6^x13^ 

No. 246 " " 7^x1514 

No. 162 " " 13><txl7^ 

No. 160 " " 12 x 18 

No. 157 " " 12^x16^ 

No. 154 " " 121^x141/4 



Special price per hundred ^1.00 

2.00 

2.50 

3.30 

5.20 

5.00 

4.80 

4.50 



IMPORIANF! 

A special arrangement of pages 16 and 17 of this issue permits you to have a list of 

some of our metal frames. Bend the clips, remove pages 16 and 17 and keep the 

pages for reference when you need frames 



30] 



THE FOCUS FOR OCTOBER • 1930 



U 



Portrait Quality 



^1 



DEFENDER 

Portrait Film is 
Made for Defender 
b}^ DuPont-Pathe Film 
Mfg. Corp., N.Y. City 



Speed in plenty, and with it 
a smoothness and fineness 
of grain beyond the expecta- 
tions of those familiar with 
fast emulsions. 

Clearness of base and coating 
to make doubly certain that its 
brilliant scale will register in 
the portrait print. 

A real definition of "Portrait 
Quality" is found in Defender 
Portrait Film. 



If you cannot locate a source of supply 
for Defender Film — please write us. 



DefEx\der Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




A Stimulus to 
Commercial 
Photography 



Advertising agencies, manufacturers and producers 
of window display material are learning of the 
practical advantages of Translite Prints. They want 
to be shown — are anxious to use this new form of 
photography for window displays. 

Translite is a white, translucent paper, coated on 
both sides which produces a double image at 
one printing. Color the back of the print, illuminate 
it and you have a wonderfully bold, rich transpar- 
ency, full of detail — and in color. 

You should lose no time in exploiting this new 
Translite idea. Show and sell your commercial 
customers Translite Prints. Make new customers 
through this new use of photography. 

Your dealer can supply you with Eastman Trans- 
lite Paper. Place an order today. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Vitava Opal 

A New Warm Toned Paper for Enlargifig 

Have you seen Vitava Opal — used it — marveled at its 
beautiful warm tones by direct development or toned 
it in the wonderful new Gold Toning Bath? Vitava 
Opal is a beautiful paper of wide adaptability. It may 
be used for both contact and projection printing — has 
real contact quality when used for enlarging. You 
must try it to know its quality. 

Opal is supplied in six grades — B, semi-matte, cream 
white; C, matte, cream white; G, fine grained lustre, 
natural white; H, fine grained matte, natural white; 
P, fine grained lustre, old ivory; Q^, fine grained 
matte, old ivory. All are double weight papers priced 
the same as double weight Vitava Rapid Black. Order 
now Irom your dealer. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



?;a^^^^^^^^=K^^y#§XM^^^'^^^^3:^^^:^^^=!g^:^^^^'r 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



SEPTEMBER, 1930 



No. 9 



^ w. ,■■'" 



S"' 1930 




LIBRARY 



Published by 



SEP 27 






HIRSCH & KAY^^ Received ^ 



239 Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 



§4 



l^s:^^s:^^ui^^s;^^5si^^^^^s^ 



*^Jx 



Courtesy of 

Universal Pictures 

Corporation 




Liiitiinosity Makes 
the Portrait Vivid 

Since the earliest days of art 
— long before photography 
was born — luminosity in the 
representation has been a pri- 
mary aim. For luminosity 
means reality, life. 

The brilliant richness and 
depth of prints from Agfa Por- 
trait Film negatives is by no 



means an accident. For the 
luminosity which produces 
this effect is built into the Agfa 
Portrait Film emulsion. 

Agfa Portrait Film is now 
obtainable in both regular and 
panchromatic. 




PORTRAIT 



Kt/ 



AGFA AN SCO 



OF BIIVGHAMTOIV 



IV 



THE FOCUS 

Pithlislicd Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography by HiRSCH & Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



SEPTEMHr-:R, 1Q30 



No. 9 



I\ THE PROFESSION 




■■lie 11'rr.Ulid- 



Who would he better 
qualified to wrestle 
M'ith the prohleins of 
modern photography 
than a professional 
wrestler? The answer 
may have suggested it- 
self to A. M. Eby who 
is a photographer in 
Salem, Oregon. 

He was born in Beaver City, Ne- 
braska, where his father was Sheriff 
of Hall County at that time. Raised 
in a state where men are men. and 
not far from where the tall corn 
grows, he enjoyed good health and 
lots of vitality, which found expres- 
sion in wrestling, fii'st as a boyish 
fancy, then in a more serious wav. 

Perhaps it was the ease with which 
press photographers took his picture, 
or a desire for a vocation less strenu- 
ous, that created a desire to learn the 
profession, for we next learn of his 
apprenticeship at the Newcomb Stu- 
dio, Salt Lake City, about 25 years 
ago. From there, he went to Salem, 
Oregon, to open his own studio. A 
studio was later opened in Dallas, 
Texas, but he soon returned to Salem. 
During the Spanish-American war 
he tried to enlist, but was told he was 
too short, .so he put enough card- 
board in the heels of his shoes to just 
come up to the required height. He 
is married and has five children. His 



greatest pleasure is to take his family 
for an outing on Sundays. During 
the last holiday season, his profit was 
sufficient to pay the cost of a new 
Pontiac car, which, you will agree, 
is nice business. 

The Flavor Lasts 

A SUCCESSFUL hotel manager in an 
East Bay city has remarked that the 
dining room is a most important part 
of a hotel. 

"Give the people a clean, attractive 
dining room," he said, "good food, 
well prepared, and they forget what 
they pay. They remember the place 
because of the satisfying meal but let 
the meal be unsatisfactory in taste or 
atmosphere and they have an un- 
favorable recollection, though they 
forget the price." 

It requires no Brisbane or Chester 
Rowell to see the application of this 
psychology to photographs. A picture 
made under attractive conditions, 
well made, will be a pleasant memory 
after the price is forgotten. 

HONEST 

A man tries to live up to his ideals — 
A woman to her photographs. 

Business is a great game, but it is 
great only when it is played in the 
open and on the square. There is no 
surer way to kill courage than to lend 
one's self to questionable methods. 



4] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



Professional Service 



"Jr 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San Francisco 

Room 420 Phone PRospect 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

Carefully Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

Matilda S. Ransdell 



3100 Fulton Street 



BAyview 45S4 



San Francisco 



GEORGE A. WEEDEN 
Artist 

Producer of ■ 

Fine Crayons • Water Colors • Pastels 

Oil Paintings • Ivory Miniatures 

Air Brush Work 

711-47th Ave., San Francisco 

SKvline 2759 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service. Work Guar- 
anteed. 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 



56 Third Street 



San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artistically done in real oils or 
tints — from one to quantities. 



RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do \our retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



EVER READY SERVICE 



Phone GRavstone 7912 



12S5 Gearv Street 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 [5 



Order Your Annual Publications Now 



The American Annual of Photography 

45th volume, printed on the finest coated paper and contaiiiinj^ one hundred 
or more reproductions of the best American, and foreign photographs of the 
year together with numerous practical articles, formulae and other infor- 
mation. Price, paper $1.50, cloth $2.25. Ready in November. 

Das Deutsche Lightbild 

A magnificent year book with 160 beautiful reproduced photographs and a 
number of valuable technical articles in Oerman with English and French 
translations. Last year's volume of this was undoubtedly the finest pictorial 
annual ever published. Price $4.00. Ready in October. 

Photograms of the Year 1930 

The international annual of pictorial photography, containing selected prints 
from the best workers of all countries, with valuable criticism of the pictures 
and other interesting text. Price, paper $2.50, cloth $3.50. Ready in January. 

The British Journal Photograhic Almanac 

The big book of photography, \vith practical articles, numerous beautiful pic- 
tures in rotogravure and the well-known advertising section. Price paper 
1.00, cloth $1.50. Ready in February. 

The Year's Photography 

The anual number of the Royal Photographic Society's Journal with descrip- 
tion and illustration of its annual exhibition of technical and pictorial photo- 
graphs from all over the world. Price, paper $1.25. Ready in October. 

Klimsch's Jahrruch, 1931 

This book contains valuable articles in Oerman on the year's progress in 
photo-engraving and printing methods with beautiful monotone and full color 
reproductions by all the most beautiful processes known. Price, cloth $5.00. 
Ready in November. 

The Japan Photographic Annual 

Text partly in English, mainly in Japanese. Beautiful reproductions of fapan- 
ese work only. A much larger volume than last year's book. Price, $3.00. Ready 
in September. 

The Fourth International Photographic Salon of Japan, 1930 

230 beautiful full page reproductions of photographs from all over the world, 
exhibited in Japan in 1930. Price, $4.00. Ready in October. 

Photofreund-Jahrbuch 

Similar to the last, but a little larger in size of page. Text also in Cerman. 
Price $2.50. Ready in January. 

Luci Ed Ombre 

An annual of Italian artistic photography, showing only the work of the Italian 
School. Strong and masterly. Price, boards $2.50. Ready in August. 

XXVe Salon International de Photographie 1930 

The annual of the French Photographic Society, made up of pictures from the 
Paris Salon. Printed throughout in photogravure. Price, $3.50. Ready in 
December. 



6] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



^^Here is 
Your 

Sample of 
The Better 
Sulphite'' 



The effects of too much, too little or 
impure Sulphite: 

1. An excess causes precipitation in the develop- 
ing solution. 

2. Insufficient Sulphite in fixing bath causes milk- 
iness. 

3. Impurities or too little sulphite will impair 
the keeping qualities of the developing solution. 

« « « 

For detailed explanation of these facts send for 
our handbook "Chemistry of Photography." 




Return This CouponlH^^' 



MALLINCKRODT 
CHEMICAL 



WORKS 



A coiistiuctive force in the chrrnical 
industry since- 1S67 



St. Louis 
Philadelphia 



Montreal 
New York 



PROPERTIES 
1 • Boes not cake . 

2 ' Makes cn/stal 
clear solution. 

3 • Always up to 
strength. 



^:M 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

Second and Mallinckrodt Sts. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

I enclose 10c for a one-pound Sample of Nour 
better Photo Sulphite. 

□ Check if you want our handbook 

"Chemistry of Photography." 



Name .. 
Address 
Cily 



State. 



THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMHER • 1930 



[7 



Things Yom Should Kmo^H^ 



ABOUT COLORS 
{Continued from August 



1 1 oil' to Secure Ilar- 

inony by Contrast 
Those primary ami 
secondary colors which 
are farthest apart may 
be used in combination 
with pleasing results. 
There are three pairs 
of these complements — 
red and green, blue and 
orange, yellow and 
purple. This is called 
"complementary harmony." Comple- 
mentary harmony is one of the most 
pleasing ways in which to apply color 
to the printed page. 

If we wnsh a strong contrast we 
take a complementary harmony, or 
harmony of a primary and a secon- 
dary color, as follows : 

Red and green ; 

Yellow and violet ; 

Blue and orange. 

For a softer, more subdued con- 
trast we may use combinations of two 
secondary colors as follows: 

Green and orange ; 

Violet and green ; 

Orange and violet. 

For a still more subdued effect we 
may use combinations of a secondary 
and tertiary color as follows: 

Orange and olive ; 

Green and russet ; 

Violet and citron. 
rioiv to Harmonize Black, White 
Gray, and Gold 

Black, white or neutral gray may 
go with any color or combination of 
colors and result in perfect harmony 




— black because it has 
no color at all, white 
and gray because they 
are a neutral composi- 
tion of all three pri- 
mary colors. Any two 
complementary colors 
used in their full in- 
tensity but separated 
by black or white, or 
when one of the colors 
is half neutral, result 
in a complementary harmony. 

Black harmonizes with any other 
color, but when used in combination 
with one of the cold colors, green, 
blue or violet, the latter should be of 
a tint instead of a full color, as other- 
wise they will not furnish enough 
contrast to the black or brighten up 
the page sufficiently; on the other 
hand if warm colors are to be worked 
with black, such as red, orange, or 
yellow, they should be used in their 
full tones and not as tints. 

In this connection attention may 
well be called to the use of red and 
black — probably the most frequently 
used colors. While there are occasions 
on which the pure red of the spectrum 
may be combined pleasingly with 
black, still in the great majority of 
instances the addition of a little yel- 
low to the red — making a red orange 
— will give a color that is far more 
satisfactory. The result is more 
brightness and consequently a strong- 
er contrast to the black. 

Gold harmonizes with all colors 

[ Continued on page 9 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan \)ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 



Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact quality. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlarging paper for use where speed and 

quality are of equal importance. 

The Gevaert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
variety of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in any of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest quality. 



Descriptive Catalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 55th St., New York, N. Y. 

413-+21 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicago, 111. Toronto, Can. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH & KAYE, 
San Francisco 



THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMBER • 19^0 



[9 



About Colors 

[ Continued from Page 7 ] 

except yellow and orange. Care 
should be taken not to use too much 
gold as an excess gives an unpleasant 
effect. 

White, gray, and gold when used 
with other colors which harmonize 
in themselves do not in any way les- 
sen this harmony ; on the other hand, 
colors which do not harmonize in 
themselves may be brought into har- 
monious effect by being separated by 
white, gray or gold bands or edg- 
ings. This principle is frequently ap- 
plied in the design of flags to bring 
colors into harmony. It is also a com- 
mon practice for engravers to use 
white or gray between colors which 
otherwise would clash. 

Hniv to Gray and Key Colors 

We have learned that it is not 
good practice to use color in its full 
intensity, except, perhaps, in a very 
small quantity, as for an initial or 
some other small spot where we wish 
particularly to place emphasis, and 
all primary and secondary colors are 
of full intensity. 

Let us find, then, how this in- 
tensity may be reduced or neutralized 
without the use of white, which 
would make a tint ; or black, which 
would give a muddy appearance. 

Colors may be brought into har- 
monious relation by two methods — 
(a) graying and (b) keying. 

A color is grayed by mixing it with 
a very small quantity of its comple- 
ment. For example, pure red and yel- 
low are clashy, but by mixing green 
(the complement of red) with the 
red, and violet (the complement of 
yellow) with the yellow, we ha\e 
grayed them, producing a dull red 
and tan which is a very satisfying 



combination. By graying a color we 
take away its intensity, soften it, yet 
do not interfere with its beauty and 
clearness as we would by adding 
black and white. 

Or we may elect to key the colors 
by mixing a third color with each, 
which then unites both of them. For 
instance, we may mix blue with the 
red, and blue with the yellow, pro- 
ducing violet and green, which is also 
a pleasing combination, since each 
contains blue. 

Complementary (Colors Intensify 
En'ch Other 

Complementary colors, when 
placed side by side or surrounding 
each other, appear stronger and 
brighter. For example, a spot of red 
will look brighter and more attractive 
if placed on a background of green 
than under any other circumstances. 
Likewise, white, black, gray or gold 
against a contrasting background 
seem to take on added brilliancy. This 
fact is taken advantage of by the 
printer where extreme brilliancy is 
desired. The same ink which looks 
dull and unattractive in some combi- 
nations will brighten up and appear 
beautiful if properly surrounded by 
its complement. (The Practice of 
Printing. ) 

■.^ 

This finishes the series of three ar- 
ticles on color, started in the July 
issue. If you have misplaced your July 
or August copies, ask us for replace- 
ments. You will find these articles 
helpful in many ways. 

There are men whom Fate can 
never keep down — they march jaunti- 
ly forward, and take by divine right 
the best of everything that Earth 
affords. 



10} 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 




The New 

Ingento Photo Mailer - 

Has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gummed flap, making it possible 
to mail photos to foreign countries or send 
them by first-class mail when privacy or addi- 
tional safety is desired. 

The Ingento is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking 
photographs, drawings, sketches or any other valu- 
able matter when this mailer is used, as they are 
perfectl}^ preserved by the double corrugated board 
Avhich covers the photograph or drawing both front 
and back. The capacity of this mailer is greater than 
others and it is more quickly sealed. The various 
sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popu- 
lar up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios 
throughout the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
made 8^ x 11^/2 inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8x10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board: it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



Made in the 
Popular 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 



No. 

No. 

No. 
*No. 
*No. 
*No. 
*No. 8 

No. 9 

*No. 10 

*No. 11 

*No. 12 

No. 14 

*Packed in 
containin 



Folloivinff 
Sizes 

5^x iVs 
654 X 8^ 
7/2 X 9/2 
8^x10^ 
101/4 X 123/^ 
12^ X 14^ 
101^x15 
6^x 91/4 
71/4x115/^ 
8^x111/2 
13 XI714 
16 x20^ 
cartons 
g fifty 



Manufactured by Burke & James, Inc., Chicago, Illinois 

Carried in Stock by Hirsch & Kaye 

SIZES FOR ANY NEED.' PRICES NONE CAN MEET.'' PROMPT SHIPMENTS.'' 



Lantern 
Slide Cover . 
Glass 

3U4 

An imported glass of finest 

quality and uniform 

thinness 

Maximum Transparency 

Per dozen $ .35 

Per case (1108 pieces) 8.30 

Order today from 
Hirsch ^ Kaye 



The Front Page 

The aerial view of Oakland, Cal., 
on the front page was made by a 
U. S. Army photographer, Sgt. 
O'Callahan, personally known to 
many of our readers. The picture was 
made at 10:45 a. m. on February 13, 
and is a recent view of the down town 
section, looking north. 

Time 

Time is the one thing that can ne\er 
be retrieved. One may lose and regain 
a friend ; one may lose and regain 
money; opportunity once spurned may 
come again ; but the hours that are 
lost in idleness can never be brought 
back to be used in gainful pin-suits. 
Most careers are made or marred in 
the hours after supper. 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[11 



StraK/lii From flir 
Shoulder 

At a meeting sponsored by the San 
Francisco Commercial Photographers' 
Association, Sept. 2, Mr. George D. 
Stafford addressed a group of local 
and nearby photographers. Mr. Staf- 
ford is 2nd Vice-President of the Pho- 
tographers' Association of America 
and had spoken at the Seattle Con- 
vention. As owner and operator of a 
very successful studio in Chicago, he 
spoke a language that his audience 
could easily understand. 

Mr. Stafford spoke for two hours 
on the future of the P. A. of A. and 
for another hour, answered questions 
and engaged in discussion of various 
details. You arc familiar with the 
four-year publicity plan now coming 
to a close, and most of Mr. Stafford's 
message dealt with the next campaign, 
which will be of a different and more 
helpful nature. While we cannot re- 
print his entire address, we will give 
you the highlights. 

Mr. Stafford stated that photogra- 
phy, in its many branches, is now 
second or third in size among the in- 
dustries. Xhe publicity campaign now 
in its last year, had four principal 
purposes: 

1. Create demand for pictures. 

2. More appreciation of pictures. 

3. Better organization among pho- 
tographers. 

4. Educate photographers. 

.^ 
During the past few years, 6,000 
billboards were used, 500 magazine 
pages and thousands of inches of 
newspaper space. 

The next campaign to be one of 
two years' duration, will cover the 
following activities: 



International advertivsing 

Monthly show cards 

Bulletin service — technical and 
business. 

Tie-up advertising help and sugges- 
tions 

Field service by a regional P. A. of 
A. man 

Traveling exhibit 

Pathway (magazine for members) 

Insurance division 

Better business bureau affiliation 

Winona school 

Christmas billboards at cost 

Membership certificate 

4,000-mile lens, connection with 
distant photographers for distant 
work. 

A survey was made of perhaps 10 
per cent of the 12,000 established stu- 
dios and commercial plants in this 
country and Canada, taking in all 
parts. 

The survey, made by an established 
survey firm, showed interesting facts. 
Studios visited were classified as fol- 
lows : 

Excellent, 7 per cent 
Fair, 41 per cent 
Good, 33-1/3 per cent 
Poor, 17 per cent 
Impossible, 2 per cent 
How other studios get their busi- 
ness: 

Telephone, 10 per cent 
Outside help, 18 per cent 
No method, 72 per cent. 
The 12,000 established in this coun- 
try and Canada did 236 million dol- 
lars gross business, divided as follows: 
Less than $5,000, 20 per cent 
$6,000 to $10,000, 25 per cent 
$1 1.000 to $20,000, 26 per cent 
$21,000 to $50,000, 23 per cent 
Over $50,000 . . 6 per cent 

[ Concluded on Page 23 ] 



12] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



From the Melting Pot to Your 
Bank Account 

ALBO 



Gets all the silver from your Hypo 
Solution. The ideal precipitant — 
clean, odorless, speedy, complete re- 
covery. $3.00 for 5-lb. can. Full di- 
rections enclosed. 

Prepared by Wildberg Bros. 
Smelting & Refining Co., San Fran- 
cisco, who will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price. 



§ 



Distributed by 

HiRSCH & Kaye 




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Waste- 
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Labor & 
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FOR YOU 



Emulsions made and coated in the Hammer way have 
the characteristics every picture maker is searching for. 

Hammer has made it possible for your negatives to have 
strength and at the same time a softness that will produce 
prints with brilliancy and detail. 

Hammer supplies Special Brands for Special Work and 
will mail you free of charge a portfolio of prints showing 
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Write for your portfolio today. 



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159 West 22nd Sl 
New York City 



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St. Louis 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[13 



Til ere' s Profitable Business 
in (I Name 
To name a thing. The unseen power 
of association. Success and prosperity 
the reward of a good product or com- 
pany with the right name. Name un- 
wisely — a pile of expenses like a row 
of bubbles, a few expiring ripples on 
the sea of business. 

Some few names are gold mines in 
developing selling arguments, some 
are neutral, many are actually detri- 
mental. Why? 

An attempt has been made to 
plumb some of the depths of the mind, 
to drag up some of the reasons why 
people prefer one name to another. 
In San Francisco, Chicago, Cleveland 
and Washington, students of psy- 
chology made personal canvasses to 
learn buyers' preferences in firm and 
product names. While the results re- 
ferred largely to retail lines of busi- 
ness, the fundamental principles in- 
volved are equally applicable in all 
phases of business. 

These investigators called at homes 
during the evening when it could be 
presumed that the occupants were 
there. Choice of residences included 
the middle class, suburban, indepen- 
dent free groups generally owning 
their homes, having telephones and 
frequently some domestic help. A 
typewritten sheet was left with the 
head of the house. There was a brief 
word of explanation as to the purpose 
of the visit and a request that the 
sheet be filled in as it would be called 
for on the following evening. 

The questionnaire and tabulated re- 
sults were as follows: 

Between the following typical 
names of business firms or products, 
judging by the names alone, all other 



things being equal, which would you 
choose to do business with ? 
Photographers 

George's Photo Studio 75 

Photocraft Studio 372 

No choice 66 

Grocery and Provisions 

Alexander and Company 70 

Purity Market 411 

No choice 20 

Cleaning and Dyeing 

Vogue Cleaners 383 

Manhattan Cleaning and Dye- 
ing Co 90 

No Choice 30 

Confectionery 

Mary Ann Chocolates 334 

Palace of Sweets Company's .... 99 

No choice 61 

Restaurants and Cafes 

Wisteria Cafe 432 

Harrison's 50 

No choice 21 

Conclusions: The attractive name 
appealed almost instantlv. Naturally, 
local associations, the remembrance of 
some contact, pleasant or otherwise, 
with a similar name would have its 
effect and perhaps, say the psycholo- 
gists, operate in about 10 per cent of 
the cases and probably without affect- 
ing the totals one way or the other. 

Not infrequently the students 
would be asked concerning some prev- 
iously well-advertised name, where 
the commodity might be foimd now. 
It was evident that the name lingered 
in the mind. 

That there are dangers in names 
that are attractive, was pointed out by 
several. An attractive name that does 
not live up to its meaning draws 
curses. A sanitary Market that was 
not sanitary would, by its very name, 
be blacklisted by the buyer. 

Excerpts from an article by Uthai Vincent 
Wilson in "Ad-vertising & Selling" 



14} THE FOCI S FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 

COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For- sale by 

HIRSCH ©> KAYE 



Why you need a 

BEATTIE Hollywood Britelite 

1. "You get what you see." The material used in the 
light area reflects the same proportions of actinic light 
as is present in the main source. The visual lighting is 
reproduced perfectly in the negative. Mediums con- 
taining lead absorb considerable actinic light, reflecting 
only the long wave non-actinic light perfectly. 

2. Completely diffused, the reflected light from the Brite- 
Lite area wipes out lines, wrinkles and "bones in the 
neck." A "hard" surfaced area, such as is used in out- 
door movies, acts as a mirror or a spotlight, adding to 
the retoucher's troubles. 

3. With a cast base, ball-bearing casters, a rigid stand, a 
toggle joint that can never slip, the manipulation of 
the B rite-Lite is a simple matter. Quickly adjusted to 
any conceivable angle, it "staj^s put." 

4. The Silvoleaf area retains its effectiveness over a long 
period of time. It will not tarnish, even in the presence 
of sulphide fumes from the darkroom. 

5. The light area is replaceable when worn or when new 
developments make a change advantageous. 

For illustrations, de- 6. Instructions, with diagrams, enable the photographer 

icnption and prices ... r o i- 

sre pages 49-50 to put the Britc-Litc to its most cffcctivc uses — and to 



13//; Edition 
IIiRSCir & Kaye 

catalog. equipment. 



avoid the grief possible with any type of photographic 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[15 



-4- 



Blotches — Spots 

Blotches of many shapes, streaks 
and white spots are sometimes en- 
countered when working with papers 
having a luster surface. Defender Silk 
for example. The trouble can often 
be overcome by using fresh developer 
only, not forgetting the recommended 
proportion of bromide. 

This holds good especially in locali- 
ties where the tap water is being puri- 
fied with chlorine, alum or other 
chemical ingredients. During such pe- 
riods it is well also to avoid mixing 
large quantities of stock solution 
ahead unless distilled water is used. 

And by the way, when a stock de- 
veloper is highly concentrated, wood 
alcohol is a valuable aid in preventing 
precipitation of the chemicals. 

— The Defender Bulletin 

Potassium Bromide solution should 
keep indefinitely, and it will. But in 
course of time, it may accumulate 
other things, besides Potasium Bro- 
mide and water. And it sort of gets 
tired or worn out in time. Use fresh 
chemicals, and see that the bottles and 
contents are kept clean and fresh. 

"Camera Craft" in 
New Dress 

The 25th day of each month is a 
time we look forward to, so we can 
receive our supply of "Camera 
Craft." Each issue brings new ideas 
and timely articles about people and 
things with which we are all familiar. 
On the 25th of June a surprise 
package was handed to us, for the 
July "Camera Craft" appeared with 
a new cover. It was one of those 
modern creations, form fitting as it 
were, colorful and modernistic. Suc- 



ceeding numbers have been equally at- 
tractive. 

Now, to understand just what we 
mean, order a copy of "Camera 
Craft" (20c) or, better still, send us 
your year's subscription, $2.00, for 
which you will receive 12 helpful, in- 
teresting books. 

Use Other Windows 

Put window displays for your studio 
windows of leading stores or build- 
ings where the crowds pass by. This 
is especially important if you have a 
studio somewhat removed from the 
main shopping and business district. 
These displays must not be just mere 
accumulations of stuff. You must plan 
them and make them eye-catching, 
attention-holding, sales-making. 

National Installment 
Anthem 

Buy a new auto and "Ride As You Pay." 
Buy a piano and "Pay As You Play." 
Buy a new topcoat and "Pay As You 

Wear." 
Buy a new jj^olf suit and "Pay As You 

Swear." 
This be our motto, our hue and our cry: 
"We pay as we live and we pay as we 

die." 

Make a down payment on any old thing: 

Silverware, radio set or a ring. 

"Pay As You Use It," "Your Credit's 

Good Here," 
I'hese be the captions that fill us with 

cheer. 
This be our slogan, who hearken and buy: 
"We pav as we live and we pav as we 

die." 

Bu\' a new H\veeper and "Pay As You 

Sweep." 
Buy a new mattress and "Pay As ^'ou 

Sleep." 
Maybe we'll starve when we're old and 

we're gray 
(This is a world where \ou eat as you 

pay) 
Maybe we'll starve, but, Shout It on Higlr. 
"We'll pay as we live — we can PRAY as 

we die." — Asia Kagowan (Life) 



16] 



THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMBF.R • 1930 




Our Salesmen Tell Us 



H. H. Serox, thdt busy man 
from Bakersfield, made one of his 
periodical visits to San Francisco I'e- 
cently. Always, where a man is in a 
hurry, something is bound to happen. 
On this particular trip, some obscure 
engine trouble caused a delay of some 
four or five hours. 

Something new in traveling stu- 
dios is announced in Home Studios 
Inc. which will operate a fleet of 
motor trucks to which special bodies 
are fitted. Within the car will be 
found completely equipped camera 
rooms of most modern and attractive 
type. Fred Hartsook is president of 
the new organization which is in no 
way connected with the chain of 
Hartsook Studios. 

Dr. Alexander Arkatov has es- 
tablished a studio at the Hotel St. 
Francis, San Francisco. During the 
last two weeks of August he held an 
exhibition of his prints which at- 
tracted considerable attention. 

Paul W. Hollingshead was of- 
ficial photographer at the California 
Flower Festival held in San Leandro 
early this month. He was established 
in an attractive booth which enabled 
him to make many profitable contacts. 

Alvin Grant, owner of the well 



known Fox Studios, Denver, Colo., 
was a recent visitor in this city. He 
and Mrs. Grant were on their way 
to Hawaii for an extended vacation. 
Mr. Grant is a former San Fran- 
ciscan, and will be remembered for 
his clever work as operator for the 
Whigham Studios. 

Frank Aston, San Luis Obispo, 
recently entertained his brother from 
Ohio. This was the first meeting of 
the brothers in 36 years. 

George Russel, San Francisco 
aerial photographer, uses an unique 
envelope for his correspondence. The 
envelope measures 6x8 inches, a con- 
spicuous size, and has an aerial view 
of San Francisco on the front, with 
only a small opening for address. 
Verily, pictures tell the story. 

Miss Maude Stinson will exhibit 
her prints at a Salon held at the 
Women's City Club, Berkeley. Pho- 
tographers, especially those in the 
East Bay district, should plan to see 
the display. Date — Sept. 25 to Oct. 1. 

H. B. Crisler, mountaineer and 
photographer, made extensive explor- 
ation in the wilds of Olympia Na- 
tional Forest. For four weeks he 
explored primitive country, living en- 
tirely off the country. 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 [17 



MARSHALL'S 
SMOKELESS 

FLASHLIGHT POWDER 



Research has scored again — the appar- 
ently impossible has been accomplished 
— Marshall's Smokeless Flashlight pow- 
der combining high illumination, no 
smoke, odor or dust, high speed and little 
report is now available. 
Why say more — just buy a bottle at your 
stockhouse and you will probably be even 
more enthusiastic than we are. Profits will 
increase because flashlight bans will be 
lifted — troublesome bags may 
be discarded 



^ 



Carried in Stock by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 (iraiit Ave., San Francisco 



18] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 




RAPID PAPER HOLDER 

R ap id Enlarge men ts 

Enlargements can be made as fast 
as your enlarger will print them. 
With the Rapid Paper Holder there 
is practically no time lost between ex- 
posures. Generally from one-half to 
three-fourths of the time used for 
making enlargements is wasted in 
placing and handling the paper. An 
accurate and speedy paper holder is 
an absolute necessity. Four hours 
should not be spent on a job that 
could have been finished in one. 

Operation 

Several dozen sheets of paper are 
inserted in the open side of the holder, 
all with the emulsion side up. The 
paper is pressed upward by a metal 
plate and springs against the frame 
which forms the size of the picture 
and leaves a quarter inch white mar- 
gin. 

The frame, which forms the mask 
for the picture, is hinged on the side 
so that ly^ inches of the front edge 
can be raised up to make easy the 
insertion and withdrawal of the paper. 
When one exposure is made, the top 
sheet of paper is withdrawn and the 
next sheet is in place ready for the 
next exposure. 

Auto Focus Enlargers 

The Rapid Paper Holder can be 
used with any Auto Focus Enlarger 



without changing the adjustment in 
any way. The plane of the paper is 
one inch above the base, which places 
it in the correct focus for automatic 
enlargers. 

Tinted Borders and 
White Margins 

Printed borders can be made by us- 
ing a regular border tinting mask and 
using the stops on two edges of the 
holder frame as guides and then print- 
ing the border with a separate light 
placed near the lens of the camera. 

For plain white margins of irregu- 
lar shape, or for borders wider than 
one-fourth inch, a mask is cut of card- 
board the size and shape of the pic- 
ture desired and is clamped on the top 
of the paper holder with the two 
thumb screws on the back of the 
frame. 

Contact or Projection 
Prints? 

Many of the largest and best stu- 
dios make practically all of their 
prints by projection, because they are 
able to get a quality which is impos- 
sible by contact printing. With an 
Elwood Enlarger and this new Paper 
Holder your enlargements can be 
made as rapidly, or even more rapidly 
than contact prints. 

The Rapid Paper Holder is made 
in three sizes for: 

5x 7 Paper 7.00 

8x10 Paper 7.50 

11x14 Paper 10.00 

Any of the several models of El- 
wood Enlargers, and others, may be 
obtained from Hirsch & Kaye. Order 
your enlarger and Rapid Paper Hohl- 
er. Terms, if desired. 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[19 



■^ 



Why the Dealer? 

From The Defender Bulletin 

Published by Defender Photo Suppiv 

Company 

It is indeed a very light mail that 
does not bring at least one letter from 
a photographer demanding that we 
sell him direct. The reasons advanced 
are many: the most frequent perhaps 
— "my dealer is alwaj's out of what I 
want." 

Every such letter is a worry. We 
want every user or prospective user 
of Defender goods to get "what he 
wants when he wants it." In pro- 
portion as we approach that ideal, 
we prosper. Every failure costs some- 
thing. 

And yet we are not shaken in our 
conviction that distribution through 
the dealer is the best policy ; that the 
dealer has a legitimate place in the 
economic scheme. That if he passed 
out of the picture, the average pho- 
tographer would pay more for the 
material he uses and have a tougher 
time getting it. "Eventually," — 

Why? It costs less to serve a hun- 
dred consumers say — through one 
middle man than the same hundred 
as individuals. The principle of 
■wholesale and retail. Few photogra- 
phers buy in wholesale quantities. 

Sensitizing plants do not carry 
great stocks ahead. There are "coat- 
ing schedules," tyrants of manufac- 
turing routine. Schedules and costs 
are vitally linked together. The con- 
sumer, needing a particular grade of 
paper, film or plates, has two chances 
of getting it promptly — from the 
dealer's stock or, failing that, through 
the dealer's requisition on the manu- 
facturer. With the dealer out of the 
way, the two chances are reduced to 
one. 



Then the time element. In these 
days of rapid transportation there are 
itw photographers so isolated that 
there is not a well-stocked supply house 
just a few hours away. Practically all 
sensitizing plants are segregated in the 
East. 

Is the photographer a manufac- 
turer? A smal plant owner who must 
worry about the cost of his raw ma- 
terial ? Rather, is he not a creator 
who deals in things of sentiment — an 
artist if you will ? Is not the cost of 
his material rather small in proportion 
to what he gets for it in finished 
form? And his big cost those intangi- 
ble things he never buys ; his person- 
ality, his imagination, his skill, "his 
infinite capacity for taking pains." 

Why should he waste precious time 
seeking a better price direct, "shop- 
ping 'round,' " when a little of his 
time devoted to establishing friendly 
contract with the nearby dealer places 
the latter in position to give the kind 
of service the dealer is eager to give ; 
that personal, individual service that 
will save Mr. Photographer much in 
time and worry from day to day. 

More and more as America be- 
comes "standardized" merchants are 
stressing service as the thing they 
have to sell. The stockhouse is not be- 
hind the procession. Read their ad- 
vertisements. Service ! A study of each 
individual's needs to find the most 
nearly perfect way of meeting those 
needs. Service more than merchandise. 

As we see it, the photographer prof- 
its more from the various accommo- 
dations included in modern dealer 
service, than he could hope to do by 
being rated as a quantity consumer 
and buying direct. There will be 
much lost motion, much spending of 
time and effort, to ofY-set a possible 

[ Contiiiufd iiM Page 21 ] 



20 ] 


THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 






Why purchase foreign Lenses when 

v:elost:[g:v[Ats 

are available? 

The Series la /6.3-/7.7 
Velostigmat 

Three fine anastigmats in one. Both of the single elements 
may be used alone and they like the doublet are fully cor- 
rected anastigmats. 

The triple convertible feature in a lens is of infinite value 
in obtaining telephoto effects, better perspective, or larger 
images from a given point of \\tw. 

The Series 11 f 4.5 
Velostigmat 

An all-round lens with high speed and exceptional anastig- 
matic corrections. Recommended for general studio and home 
portrait work as well as speed photography, enlarging and 
copying. 

This lens in the larger sizes is equipped with a diffusing de- 
vice which adds to its usefulness by reducing retouching. 

The Series III /9.5 
Velostigmat 

A wide angle lens incorporating the finest anastigmatic cor- 
rections. It works at the ultra-rapid speed of f9.5 which 
makes it ideal for focusing in dimly lighted interiors. 
Being a flat field lens it lends itself admirably to banquet and 
commercial work where sharp, uniform definition are re- 
quirements. 

Send for our free cataloc/ lliat gi'ves detailed in- 
formation on tliese and other JVollensak lenses. 

WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N,Y. 

Manufacturers of quality photograpliic lenses 
and shutters since 1899 


^ 



THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[21 



Why the Dealer? 

[ Continued from Page 19 ] 

sa\ing of a very few dollars. The 
modern studio must reach out in many 
directions to obtain the average sup- 
plies for a year's operation. No manu- 
facturer makes all. But the up-to-date 
dealer's establishment is a clearing 
house for all of it. 

We believe that the dealer has a 
definite and important part in the 
distribution scheme. Believing it, we 
follow that policy. To the best of our 
ability we try, in whatever way pre- 
sents itself, to put our photographer 
friends in touch with the dealer who 
will supply their needs for Defender 
Products. As supplementary, it is our 
ambition, by correspondence or 
through representatives, to maintain 
friendly contact with every consumer 
of Defender goods. Both our responsi- 
bility and our pleasure. Arising, may 
we say, from pride and confidence 
in the things we make. 

"C" — Like in Calif ornui 

When you place an order by tele- 
phone for mountings or other mate- 
rials designated by letter, you cannot 
make the designation too clear. Al- 
most every day our order department 
receives long distance telephone or- 
ders for paper and mountings, in 
which the size and grade is not under- 
stood the first time, due to the simi- 
larity in sound of C and Z, F and S, 
B and D, M and N and others. 

A good plan to folow is the one 
used in the designation of signal flags 
on ships, whereby the flags. A, B, C, 
D, etc., are called Able, Bay, Cost, 
Dog, etc. 

We sugest an adoption of the plan, 
something like this — Athena M — M 



like in milk. Or, Z ^I Keswick — Z 
like in Zebra, M like in money. When 
mountings are ordered the size will 
help to distinguish the letters. By do- 
ing so, you will save telephone tolls 
and avoid misunderstanding. 
^ ,^ 
A Fresh Viewpoint Is 
Ahvays Helpful 

Everyone at some time or other has 
looked longingly, through rose-colored 
glasses, at some other line of business 
as offering more advantages and op- 
portunities than his own. If the 
change was made, however, it was 
soon discovered that there were just 
as many hazards and as much "grief" 
in the new business as in the former 
connection. 

Staying too close to a job is very 
apt to distort the viewpoint. The 
everyday problems and unpleasant 
happenings bulk up and overshadow 
the really important opportunities 
that present themselves for advance- 
ment. If it is possible to occasionally 
place one's self in the position of an 
observer, rather than an actual parti- 
cipant, it is easier to consider the fac«* 
tors which make for progress and 
avoid the mental depressions that slow 
us up. A fresh viewpoint often means 
the difference between aggressiveness 
and stagnation. 

Every line of business has its suc- 
cesses which proves that there is am- 
ple opportunity for all who are able 
to surmount the petty details of the 
"day-to-day grind." The photographic 
industry is no exception, it offers bet- 
ter opportunities today than ever be- 
fore and anvone who is not realizing 
his objectives perhaps needs the stimu- 
lus of a fresh viewpoint. 

^ .*« 
Luck is an understudy of industry. 



22 } 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 




Opaque at a Single Stroke! 

When you buy opaque, look for the 
time and money saving qualities 
offered in "Asco" — 

Will not crack or chip off. 
Fast working — quick drying. 
Rules perfectly with pen. 
Fine lines can be cut in clearly 
and easily — Covers smoothly 
with thin film and it's 

Opaque on Clear Glass 
With One Coat! 

No. 0—21/^ oz. $0.50 No. 2—18 oz. $2.25 
No. 1—9 oz. $1.25 No. 5— Quart $7.50 

A trial will convince you of the many 

superior qualities of 

''Asco" Opaque 

HiRSCH & Kaye 

have it 



Most photographers are fortunate in 
the purity of the water used in their 
workrooms. A few others are not so 
fortunate, and because of local con- 
ditions, the water contains matter 
that must have an effect on their pic- 
tures. 

If you suspect that your water sup- 
ply is not what it should be, we have 
an interesting publication that will 
help 3'ou improve the condition, and 
if you are interested, write to us for 
a copy of the pamphlet, "Effect of 
the Water Supply on Photographic 
Operations." 



ROSETONE 

GOLDTONE 

BLUETONE 

These beautiful tones can be ob- 
tained on different grades of paper 
in three to five minutes. Do not 
heat solution. 

Easy to use. You may obtain 
many other tones by mixing these 
toners, as Goldtone and Bluetone 
give beautiful Jade tones, and other 
combinations. 

May be applied to a print with a 
common brush or with air brush. 
It is fine for tinting lantern slides 
or wherever a transparent color 
is desired. 

Rosetone — Goldtone — Bluetone 
are three separate toners and are 
sold separately or as a unit of three, 
so you can mix them to obtain the 
different tones. 

Rosetone — Goldtone — Bluetone 
Put up in S-ounce bottles. 

Price $1.00 each 



NEWTONE 
Restores Faded Photos 

Will return faded photos to the 
original black and white regardless 
of how much they have faded. 

Either bromide, developing out 
paper, or any print in which the 
silver image has faded due to sul- 
phurization, or will return sepia 
prints to black and white. 

You will be amazed at this won- 
derful transformation when you 
see the finished photograph. 

Think of the possibility for more 
money and better work when you 
can renew a faded photo before- 
making cop5^ 

And how many people have 
faded photos who would pay most 
any price to have them restored. 

The complete unit of four bottles 
u'ill make three gallons of solution. 

Price $3.00 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



C23 



P. M. C. 

In the hustling little city of Petaluma 
(World's Eggbasket) is a motorcycle 
club. The members wear blue sweater 
with yellow letters "P. M. C." (and 
other garments, of course). 

If you were one of the photograph- 
ers in Petaluma and made pictures 
of the club, what paper would you 
use ? 

P. M. C. ? 

V and VV- 

No Depression Here! 

The Eastman Gelatine Corporation, 
a newly organized Massachusetts sub- 
sidiary of the Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany, has made a contract with the 
American Glue Company for the pur- 
chase of the gelatine plants and busi- 
ness of the American Glue Company. 

The Eastman Kodak Company al- 
ready manufactures gelatine, one of 
the most important raw materials of 
photographic film, paper, and plates, 
in Rochester and in Germany. Pur- 
chase of the new plants will provide 
a substantial additional supply. 

The main gelatine plant of the 
American Glue Company is at Pea- 
body, Mass., in the heart of a region 
of tanneries. Leather trim from tan- 
neries is the principal raw material of 
gelatine. The plant of the Essex (lel- 
atine Company, close to the American 
(ilue Company's gelatine plant and 
recently acquired by that company, is 
included under the contract of sale. 

The Eastman Gelatine Corporation 
will take over the plants and business 
almost immediately upon ratification 
of the sale by the American Glue 
Company's stockholders. 



Defender V el turd 

A new paper has been announced by 
the manufacturers of Velour Black 
paper, and they announce Veltura, a 
warm tone enlarging paper that will 
be supplied at the same price as cor- 
responding grades of Velour Black. 

Veltura will be supplied in the fol- 
lowing grades : 

C— Matt D.W. 

ES— Smooth Buff Matt D.W. 

ER—Rough Buff Matt D.W. 

F— Veltex S.W. 

I— White Rough Matt, Med. Wt. 

J_White Plat. Luster D. W. 

k— Buff Plat. Luster D.W. 

KK— Buff Rough Luster D.W. 

Order a dozen of your favorite sur- 
face today and become acquainted 
with Veltura. 

Strnu//it From the 
Shoulder 

[ Concluded from Page 11 ] 

Average gross income — $19,000 per 
year. 

Average income of other profes- 
sions: 

Realtor $6,000 

Public Accountant . $7,500 

Dentist $7,500 

Doctor $9,300 

Attorney .... $9,400 
Of these, only the photographer 
and dentist have stock bills to meet. 
They all have certain like expenses, 
such as rent, light, water, etc. 

To determine your profit or loss, 
it is a good idea to engage a public 
accountant occasionally; a half day a 
month is sufficient. . . . And remem- 
ber, when you cut prices, you take 
money from your own pocket. The 
rent, stock, etc., cost you the same. 



24] 



THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



Do not overlook Folder Styles 

^ there is an increasing demand 
for them 





1 



"THE MATINEE" 

In the MATINEE we offer a folder combining todaj^'s popularity 
for color with a reserved, quiet richness of style. 
The designs (cornerholder type) are finished in a blending of 
colors harmonizing completely with portraits and the soft toned 
Narcissus stock. 

The coloring schemes and designs are strictly modern — but sub- 
dued so that the first and last impression of the folder is quiet 
richness. 

Suitable for all classes of work — the smaller sizes especially for 
school pictures. 

In all standard sizes 3x4 to 7x9^ 

Prices range from $8.00 to $18.00 per 100 

For fifteen cents we will send samples of both 
the Greytone and the Neutralblend. This good 
looking folder should be on your sales counter 
this season SAMPLE OFFER F-109 



^ 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[25 



-4- 



Jer r y ^ s 











/',; ..:^ 











Cor 



n e r 



By Himself 



I SUPPOSE you got the big new cata- 
log I mailed you. Now we'll see how 
much you know whats in it. 

Did you know I worked in such a 
big place? (Where I work don't 
show on page 2, its below the side- 
walk). 

Something on page 84 makes me 
think of a pants presser. Just another 
reason why you need it. 

When you take pictures of a hi- 
jacker put him on the spot. Page 50 
and 51 shows you how. 

Every photographer needs a "rod" 
even if he don't shoot hijackers. Nice 
assortment on page 65. 

More gangster stuff on page 78. 

Oh, m' dear, just imagine! A man 
wrote in and says send me a girl like 
on page 48 or 49. We told him we'd 
give him a light but he would have 
to find his own girl. 

.'^ 
Good for squirrels and photogra- 
phers. That's what you'll say about 
something on page 79. 

For pouring out your home brew or 
what do you make? See page 61. 

Page 93 — something reminds me of 
a bulldog. 



That tripod on page 17 don't mean 
you can buy one and lay home after 
that. 

Page 88 when I first saw something 
there the printer had it — all bums. 

Preachers know all about hell fire- 
See page 52. 

I didn't raise my Ford to be an 
Austin. Something on page 86 made 
me think of that. 

We don't have any back scratchers, 
but on page 40 and 41 you'll see 
something that looks pretty, don't 
you think? 

Apartment house bath tubs. Also 
good for the pup. See page 58. 

Ha Ha — here's one on the printer. 
Left off the price on something on 
page 92. Here it is— $23.00 down 
and $7.00 a month for six months. 
Easy enough ? 

Those cameras on page 4 and 1 1 
were not hit by a truck. They make 
em that way. 

Now for the big prize. 

To the first 100 boys and girls who 
guess the correct answers, I will send 
a autographed order book and some 
pretty printed envelopes. 

Jerry. 



26] THE FOCrS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



Eastman Translite Paper 

For Photographic Transparencies 
in Black and White Color 

Eastman Translite Paper produces prints which have an immediate appeal 
to advertisers and producers of window display material. They serve a double 
purpose because they are equally attractive as straight photographic prints or 
as transparencies. And they are equally suitable for day or night displays. The 
print may be both black and white and colored, and either or both effects may 
be secured in the window display. 

TRANSLrrE is a duo-coated paper — has a sensitive emulsion on both sides. When 
exposed and developed an image appears on each side, one printed on the surface that 
has been in contact with the negative and one printed through the paper stock on the 
back. 

When vievs'ed by front illumination one sees an excellent black and white photo- 
graph. But when the Translite print is placed in an illuminator one sees its wonder- 
ful depth and luminosity. It becomes almost stereoscopic. This depth and richness are 
only made possible by the double image because a single image does not have the 
strength necessary for a transparency. 

Then color adds another distinct advantage to the display print on Translite Paper. 
The color may be placed on either front or back, but when the back of the print is 
colored, and a flasher attachment is used on the light in the illuminator, the print is 
alternately black and white and colored. 

The colors are beautifuU.y soft but brilliant and the desired effect is secured by 
transmitted light. Transparent oil colors are most suitable as there is never any danger 
of obscuring image detail. The transmitted light always shows full detail through the 
color. 

As a means of attracting attention to displays nothing exerts a stronger pull than 
the combination of light and color. Translite Paper is the simplest and most eco- 
nomical means of producing such displays. And with a combination negative, the 
advertising text may be made a part of the print, making the advertisement completely 
photographic. 

Tr.anslite opens a new field for the photographer — gives him the means of develop- 
ing new business in every branch of exhibition display in which it is desirable to attract 
attention to photographs of an educational or advertising nature. And so far as produc- 
ing the prints is concerned, no difficulties will be encountered. Translite is as simple to 
process as any developing paper. 

As Translite Paper is printed by contact and one image must print through the 
paper stock the sensitive emulsion on the back of the paper is necessarily much faster 
than that on the front. The two surfaces are readily distinguished, the front being 
semi-matte and the back matte. And the emulsions are so nicely balanced that any 
exposure which will give a good image on the slower emulsion will print an equall\' 
strong image through the paper on the fast emulsion. 

The speed and contrast of Translite Paper are similar to No. 2 contact papers. 
The minimum exposure time for best results should be ten seconds, and because of the 
speed of the one emulsion the paper should be handled by an OA Safelight. 

Eastman Ti^anslite Paper is supplied in standard sizes at the same prices as 
double weight Vitava Rapid Black. It is not furnished in 500 sheet packages or in rolls. 



Send your orders to 

HiRSCH & Kayk 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[ 27 



Things Are Cheaper — 
Oh-Yeah? 

Something is always taking place 
to take the joy out of life. Just when 
we read of the general drop in the 
prices of commodities, and greater 
purchasing power of the dollar, along 
comes the new tariff, which gives the 
duty on numerous photographers' ar- 
ticles a boost. 

And now the Interstate Commerce 
Commission has decided to add 52 
million dollars a year to the much 
needed revenue of the railroads and 
all class rates will be advanced on 
November 1. Class rates apply to ar- 
ticles that have a relatively high unit 
value, as contrasted with commodity 
rates given to heavy but inexpensive 
shipments such as iron ore, grain and 
coal. By this time you have probably 
guessed that photographic supplies are 
subject to class rates. Not only to 
class rates, but often double or three 
times first class, (cameras, lenses, flash 
powder, scales, lighting equipment, 
etc.) 

At this writing, the actual amount 
of increase is not known and it is 
difficult to estimate what the increase 
will mean to photography. But what- 
ever it is, you will agree with us that 
it is enough. 

Dont' Mutilate the Catalog. 
Now that the 13th edition catalog is 
in general use, we request that you do 
not cut the catalog pages to attach a 
clipping to your order for our infor- 
mation. You may want to refer to the 
article again later. 

Just mention the article and the 
page and we will understand. 




Putz Pomade 

PuTZ Pomade is a smooth working 
friction reducer. As a local reducer 
this preparation is without a peer. It 
is applied with a soft cloth or tuft of 
cotton. Since the action is purely me- 
chanical it is entirely at the command 
of the retoucher at all times. 

The use of Putz Pomade permits 
the operator to reduce any portion of 
the negative to just the exact degree 
desired. The preparation is so fine 
that it may be applied to the most 
delicate portion of the negative, and 
it will never scratch. It reduces 
more evenly because of its smooth 
consistency; morevover, it is indis- 
pensable for bringing up hair, draper- 
ies, and the light portions of the pic- 
ture. 

Putz Pomade is supplied in con- 
venient tins. It never becomes-caked, 
lasts longer than other similar prepa- 
rations, and does not leave the nega- 
tive greasy. Photographers and others 
will be glad to know that this very 
popular reducing paste is now availa- 
ble in our stock. Mr. Beattie rec- 
ommended the use of Putz Pomade, 
during his school of lighting. 

We offer the preparation in con- 
venient three ounce tins for 25 cents 
each. 



A 



nnouncing 



INDIATONE 

Porcelain Stipple 



To the Indiatone family is now added the heau- 
tiful Porcelain Stipple surface in choice of white and 
buff stocks— another revelation of what a printing 
medium can be. 

Indiatone is now available in the following: 

Smooth White Cyltex White 

Smooth Buff Cyltex Buff 

Fabric Rough White Porcelain Stipple W^hite 

Fabric Rough Buff Porcelain Stipple Buff 

Those who attended the national at Milwaukee 
will recall the Indiatone display as the outstanding 
exhibit of the convention. The rich warm beauty 
of an Indiatone print never fails to impress. 

The further advantage which Indiatone possesses 
as a double-pvirpose paper, adapted to both contact 
printing and projection, has already brought wide- 
spread adoption. And this ability to match with 
absolute certainty in an enlargement the quality and 
tone of the contact print is, obviously, no mean 
advantage. It removes completely that annoying 
chance that the customer may not like tlie projection 
because its effect — on another paper having another 
emulsion — is somehow different. The knowledge 
that with Indiatone you can duplicate easily in any 
size puts a new conviction into what you say. 

Indiatone means rich warmth without any special 
manipulalioQ. With the use of Flemish-gold toner, 
a simple cold bath solution — easy to mix and econom- 
ical — a variety of special tones of rare appeal is also 
obtainable at will. 

A Universal Paper by 

AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



[ 29 



Bargains for the Photographer 



No. 123 Photo Mailers V/o x 



No. 234 


" 




5^x111/4 " 


No. 240 


" 




61^x13^ " 


No. 246 


" 




71^x15)4 " 


No. 162 


" 




' 131/^x171/ 


No. 160 


" 




12 xl8 


No. 157 


" 




' 1254x16^ 


No. 154 






' 121/ X 141/ 

Carbon 


2 Bands 


No. 


95 


Chocolate Red 


10 " 


No. 


103 


Warm Black 


39 '• 


No. 


105 


Sepia 


4 ■' 


No. 


111 


Cool Sepia 


6 


No. 


113 


Portrait Brown 


1 


No. 


139 


Rose Pink- 


1 


No. 


140 


Bottle Green 



Special price per hundred ^1.00 

2.00 

2.50 

3.30 

5.20 

5.00 

4.80 

4.50 



Tissue 

2 Bands No. 145 Grev Green 

1 
10 

1 

2 



No. 149 Dark Red 

No. 150 Ruby Brown 

No. 169 Van Dvke Brown 

No. 168 Ink Pot 

No. 90 Single Transfer 



Offered at 33-1/3% from standard list. ( 12 rolls, 40%. May be assorted). 

Hai.ldorson Studio Cabinet 

With 4 1500-watt Photo Blue Mazda 
lamps. An excellent lighting unit for 
individual figures or groups. Each lamp 
on its own switch. 

Bargain Price ^55.00 

See page 45. H. " K. Catalog, for illus- 
tration. 

(Terms, if wanted) 

Pocket Photo Mirror Machine 

Complete with a liberal supply of mir- 
rors, backs, celluloid and easel handles. 
An excellent novelty. \'ery easily op- 
erated. Write for circular and a sample 
mirror. 

Bargain price (very reasonable) on ap- 
plication. 

JUST RECEIVED 

Just as ^ve were about to close this page, 
we received the following: 

11x14 F& S Printer 

Pako Jr. Printer 

Duplex Jr. Twin Arc Lamp 

8x10 R. B. Enlarging Camera 

8x10 View Camera 

Ansco Folding Stand 

Spotlight 

Scales 

Tray Syphon 

Allowance will be determined by the 
time you receive your copy of this edition. 
If interested, write for prices. 




Here Is Another Victor Cabinet 

Remodeled for Mazda Lamp use. Wired 
for 4-1000 watt and 2-500 watt clear 
Mazda lamps which are supplied with 
the cabinet. An excellent light. 
Bargain Price ^45.00 

5x7 Century Portrait Camera 

On Century Studio Stand, fitted with 3? j 
inch Silent Shutter. Modern back for 
5x7 double holders. 
Bargain Price ^35.00 



HiRSCH & KAYE 
SAN FRANCISCO 



30 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR SEPTEMBER • 1930 



Velour Black 



for PRINTS BY PROJECTION 



THE IDEAL combina- 
tion of speed and scale to 
give softness and balance 
— real contact quality — 
to prints made by projec- 
tion. Thus Velour Black 
gives emphasis to the best 
work in portrait or picto- 
rial photography. 

A choice of seventeen sur- 
faces in paper stock. 

Two recent aditions: 

Velonr Block ■ Canvas 

(Fabric) 
Ivora: White translucent 
fihn base — Velour Black emul- 
sion. For miniatures and deluxe 
portraits. 



SURFACES 

* Glossy 

*Scmi-Ma'i 

Matt 

** Felt ex 

Pla'imun Matt 

Buff Platinum Malt 

Platinum Luster 

Huff Platinum Luster 

Rough 

Ruff Rough 

Silk 
Buff Silk 
Maroquin 
Buff Maroquin 
IVhitc Rough-Medium 
Weight 
MonOkroM 
(RouQh Luster) 
Coral-Pearl- Jade-Turquoise 
MonOkroM 

(Silk) 

C oral- Jade 

Canvas 

{fabric) 

Ivora 

{film base) 

*Single or Double ff^eight 
**Singlc IVeight only 



Defender Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




Vitava Opal 



A New War?n Toned Paper for Enlarging 

Vitava Opal is new and is designed to enable the pho- 
tographer, who uses a warm toned paper for contact 
printing, to secure the same color and quality in his 
enlargements. It has the speed necessary for enlarging 
and the warmth of tone and gradation scale char- 
acteristic of contact printing papers. It will also 
produce rich sepia tones. 

Opal is supplied in six grades — the popular B and C, 
so well known to Vitava users, and a fine grained stipple; 
G lustre and H matte in natural white stock and P 
lustre and Q^matte in old ivory stock. All are double 
weight papers priced the same as double weight 
Vitava Rapid Black. Order now from your dealer. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Displays 

that 

Attract 

Attention 



The attention-getting value of displays on Trans- 
lite Paper has an immediate appeal to the man who 
knows the value of advertising. But you must ex- 
ploit the Translite idea — must show and sell your 
commercial customers Translite Prints. 

Translite is a white, translucent paper, coated on 
both sides, and at one printing a double image is 
produced. Color the back of the print, illuminate 
it and you have a wonderfully bold, rich transpar- 
ency, full of detail — and in color. 

Thousands of these prints are now being used in 
window display advertising. You can add thousands 
more if you will make the most of this opportunity 
for new business. Order from your dealer today. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



«*^ 
LK 



W^^:^^^M^^^^^^mX^^k3^M^^:^^mT^^^M'^^^^M^i!^ 



-^^K 



211 



AUG 2 1930 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



AUGUST, 1930 



No. 8 




PUBLISHED BY HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



H 



H 



t^^^^s^^ss^^i^^^^s^^s^^^el 




Portrait by 
Hillyer C. Vi arlick, Macon, Ga. 



One Little Moment 



That's all, and in that one 
little moment you must get 
everything that goes to make 
the picture — pose, lighting, 
modeling, expression. You 
must do it without fussing, and 
you must not fail. 

At this moment when the 
result hangs in the balance, 
there is distinct assistance in 



the extra speed, extra latitude, 
and beautiful emulsion quality 
of— 




Portrait 
Film 



AGFA AXSCO OF BIXGHA^ITOX. X. Y. 



THE FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography hy HlRSCH & Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



AUGUST, 1930 



No. 8 




' Cliisrd his sludii) 
to fight" 



IN THE PROFESSION 

The general outbreak 
of the World War took 
place in August, and in 
this issue it is fitting 
that we should tell you 
of a San Franciso pho- 
tographer who closed 
his studio to fight for 
his native country. 
Albert Rene was born in France 
and inherits the Frenchman's love of 
music, works of sculpture, and espe- 
cially pictures. As a boy he went fur- 
ther, and at every opportunity, used 
his camera. As an art student, he 
studied photography with a cousin. 

He came to America in 1902 after 
several years before the mast on a 
sailing vessel. Of the numerous places 
he had visited, he liked San Francisco 
best and decided to settle here. In 
1910 he opened his first (and present) 
studio at 2128 Fillmore Street. 

Then came the war and while some 
of us regarded it as a strictly Euro- 
pean affair, to him it was a very 
personal matter. France needed him 
and he went. For four years, he served 
as an artillerist and 1918 found him 
with six medals and decorations. 

Now he is back to his studio, his 
friends and his art. He enjoys his 
radio, and is especially fond of a hand- 
some police dog, "Mickie." He is pres- 
ident of Section 404 (American sec- 
tion) of Medaille Militaire Societv, 



in which capacity he has raised large 
sums of money for post war charities. 
Rut the war is over and after all, 
next to his art, we believe he would 
best enjoy growing flowers. 

"Do not be afraid of impairing your 
health or giving a few extra hours to 
the company that pays your salary. 
Do not be reluctant about putting on 
overalls. Rare hands grip success bet- 
ter than kid gloves. Re thorough in 
all things no matter how small or 
distasteful. 

"The man who counts his hoLirs 
and kicks about his salary is a self- 
elected failure. A man will succeed in 
anything for which he has real enthu- 
siasm, in which he is genuinely inter- 
ested, provided that he will take more 
thought about his job than the men 
working with him. The fellow who 
sits still and does what he is told will 
never be told to do big things. 

"Captains of industry are not hunt- 
ing money, they are seeking brains — 
specialized brains — and faithful, loyal 
service. Rrains are needed to carry 
out the plans of those who furnish 
the capital. 

"To my mind the best investment 
a young man starting out in business 
could possibly make is to give all his 
time, all his energies to work, just 
plain, hard work." — C. M. Schwab, 
Chairman Rethlehem Steel Corpora- 
tion, New York. 



+ ] 



THE FOCrS FOR A l' (} T S T • 19 30 



"Fully Equal to Imported 

Metol at 



One of the 

"Physically and 

Chemically 

Perfected Photo 

Chemicals" 

by 

Mallinckrodt 




3 its Best" 

•i 

J and at 

Domestic Prices 



In this way is Pictol described by 
one of the government bureaus and by many of the 
leading studios of the country. 

^Note these comments : 



'We made a comparison of Pictol 
and the developer we were using 
and found that both negatives and 
prints developed showed finer gra- 
dation in the lights and shadows." 

'Made seven 8 x 10 enlargements in 
a tray of 20 ozs. of solution. I did 
not use it for two days and then I 
developed twenty-four 8 x 10 en- 
largements in the same solution." 

'With the same formula, the same 
negative and the same paper, and 



the same light, we found that Pictol 
required much shorter exposure. Its 
energy was surprising." 

'T am ver\' well pleased with the 
tones and details given ^^^th Pictol. 
Furthermore, the sores I have had 
on my hands from Metol poisoning 
are about healed up due to the use 
of your product." 

* Original letters from which these com- 
ments were taken are in our files subject 
to inspection. 



// you are not farfiiliar with 

the ivorking qualities of Pictol, we ivill gladly send you 

a one ounce bottle for ten cents 



Address the Home Office: 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

2nd & Mallinckrodt Streets^ St. Louis, Missouri 
Makers of the finest in Photographic Chemicals since 1S67 



THE FOCUS FOR A U CJ F S T 



1930 



C-S 



Announcing ^ 



VITAVA OPAL 

An enlarging paper which produces warm tones 
by direct development 



ViTAV'A Papers giving a warm 
black tone by direct development 
have become the standard printing 
medium for high quality contact 
printing. But these warm toned pa- 
pers have not been used to any 
extent for enlarging because of 
their slow speed. 

Vitava Opal is now introduced 
to overcome this difficulty. It is a 
paper having the speed necessary 
for enlarging and the warmth of 
tone and gradation scale character- 
istic of contact printing papers. 
Vitava Opal, therefore, may be 
truly said to reproduce not only the 
quality of the contact print but its 
tone as well. Its speed is that of 
Vitava Rapid Black and the reg- 
ular D-64 developer is recom- 
mended. 

Vitava Opol is made in standard 
B and C grades to parallel these 
popular contact paper surfaces. It 
is also made in a new and very at- 
tractive stipple-grain surface which 
helps to break up the grain of re- 
touching but is smooth enough for 
prints of small size. The six grades 
are designated as follows: 

B — semi-matte, cream white, 
tlouble weight. 



C — ]VIatte, cream white double 
weight. 

G — Fine grained lustre, natural 
white, double weight. 

H — Fine grained matte, natural 
white, double weight. 

P — Fine grained lustre, old 
ivory, double weight. 

Q — Fine grained matte, old 
ivory, double weight. 

The new stipple-grain surface is 
especially attractive and prints on 
this surface shown at the Milwau- 
kee Convention were much ad- 
mired. Opal has such excellent 
quality that, with the printing light 
reduced to allow for its extra speed, 
it i.s quite practical to use it for con- 
tact printing as well as for enlarg- 
ing. And with the Athenon Devel- 
oper recommended, all of the six 
grades of Vitava Opal will pro- 
duce, by direct development, tones 
considerably warmer than the warm 
tone produced by the D-64 or simi- 
lar developers. 

The price of Vitava Opal is the 
same as for Rapid Black, double 
weight. Place an order with us at 
once and show your customers a 
new print quality in your enlarge- 
ments — real contact quality. 



Order from HiRSCIT & KAYE 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-\)ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 



Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact qualitj'. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlarging paper for use where speed and 
quality are of equal importance. 



The Gevaert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
variety of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in any of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest qualit}^ 



Descriptive Catalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 5Sth St., New York, N. Y. 

41 3-421 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicago, 111. Toronto, Can. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH Sc KAYE, 
San Francisco 



1" H K FOCrS FOR A T (J F S T 



1930 



[7 



Things You Should Kmo^H^ 



ABOUT COLORS 

(Continued from July ) 



Red is symbolic of 
intensity, passion and 
excitement. It also rep- 
resents patriotism and 
charity. Orange is sym- 
bolic of knowledge, 
civilization, enlighten- 
ment. ... It is more 
satisfactory than red 
for use with black. 
Yellow is expressive 
of richness, elegance, 
light; it must be used sparingly. 
Green is the color of coolness and also 
of fruitfulness and abundance. It is 
very restful and easy on the eyes. Blue 
symbolizes loyalty, honor, peace, per- 
manence. It is also a restful color. 
Violet is the color of royalty and dig- 
nity as well as of somberness and de- 
pression. 

From personal experiment and re- 
search, if you can dignify the trial 
and error method with such a term, 
I should like to suggest the following 
points : 

Orange, and orange tints, viz., 
orange diluted with white, when used 
judiciously, have more selling power 
than the so-called cool colors. The 
reason is obvious, though I had to 
prove it by experiment for my own 
satisfaction: It is related enough to 
red, to make it stimulate to action. 
I could, if necessary, cite several well 
authenticated instances that, to me, 
prove this statement. 

Red ,if used too freely, is likely to 
antagonize a buyer rather than cause 
favorable action. That, too, is easv to 




see through. Red stim- 
ulates him to action be- 
fore he has had a chance 
to get acquainted with 
the article offered for 
sale, and he acts ad- 
versely! In other words 
too much red is irritat- 
ing. By "too much" I 
should say that any- 
thing more than one- 
eighth of the total color 
on a given piece in red would have 
the irritating effect. Only when one 
of the legitimate results of red is 
needed should it be used. To sum it 
up, most of us use too much red. 

Any large portion of blue should 
be a tint rather than a shade; viz., 
mixed with white rather than black. 
That sounds revolutionary but will 
bear study. Blue is a very useful color, 
in business, and could be used a great 
deal more effectively than most of us 
do use it, if we but stopped to study 
its variants and their effects. Too 
light a blue is effeminate, and should 
only be used when a light, fantastic, 
or decidedly "feminine" touch is 
wanted. 

Yellow, while cheerful and stimu- 
lating, cannot stand alone, any more 
than red. It should be used sparingly, 
and never in too close combination 
with orange or red, though there are 
times when the two, with black, save 
an otherwise insipid piece of printing. 

[ Continufd on page 9 ] 



THE FOCrS FOR AUGUST • 1930 



The 



Printer 




Price with draivers, $190 



Price $175 



The cabinet frame is of metal, with or without drawers, and folding side 
shelves. 

The new one piece platen is quick-acting and designed to withstand abuse, 
and insures a perfect contact. Locking the platen lights the printing lamps 
automatically and after the predetermined time, the lights are automatically 
turned off. 

Six individually controlled lamps enable you to get just the light distribution you 
desire. 

Lastly and most important is the patented Roda Automatic Timer, which regulates 
the exposure. By a setting of the dial, any exposure from 1 to 60 seconds can be assured, 
automatically and positively; thus making all prints of a run alike and removing the 
human element of error. 

An improved device to make even difficult printing easy and profitable. 

1st. By speeding up this important part of your vs^ork. 

2nd. By new light adjustments to get the best results from uneven negatives. 

3rd. 'Qy a positive duplication of prints; as exposures being automatically 
timed to the second. 

With the Roda any inexperienced person can run through 1 to 1000 prints and you 
may be certain they will all be right. Or on large production one man can run 2 or 3 
machines, always with the same accuracy of timing. 

The' Roda easily pays for itself in a very little while through more rapid production 
of prints with better results. 

Order- your Roda Printer from 

HiRSCH & KAYE 

Terms if desired, of course 



THE F O C r S FOR A U (i U S T 



1930 



[9 



ABOUT COLORS 

[ Continued from page 7 | 

CiOOD Two-Color 

COMIUXATIOXS 

((jOiiinion pairs of coiiiplciiicnUuy 

colors have hccu omitted) 

Brownish yellow and deep \\-arni 
green. 

Violet and pale vellowish pink. 
Deep blue and yellowish green. 
Gra\ish blue and pale golden buff. 
Plum purple and orange yellow. 
Plum violet and sage green. 
Dull orange and slate green. 
Dull indigo and dull orange. 
Claret and buff. 
Chocolate and pea green. 
Maroon and warm green. 
Black and bronze yellowish green. 
Deep red and medium gray. 
Coral red and turquoise. 
Deep crimson and yellowish green. 
Golden brown and olive green. 
Pale orange and pale turquoise. 

Good Three-Color 
comrixatioxs 

Indigo, orange red and greenisli- 
yellow. 

Leaf green, orange and pale pink. 

Coral red, ultramarine blue and 
orange amber. 

Venetian red, chamois and sea green. 

Lavender, orange and yellowish 
green. 

Purple, yellow and grayish green. 

Scarlet, olive green and violet blue. 

Violet, orange yellow and green. 

Grayish blue, amber and greenish 
gold. 

Purple, pale orange and greenish 
blue. 

Crimson, leather color and blue. 

Crimson, stone color and greenish 
\'eIlow. 



(Grange red, bluish green and yel- 
lowish green. 

Orange, grayish blue and cream. 
Olive green, blue and amber. 
Blue, Turquoise and orange yellow. 
Red, gold and blue. 
Blue, red, violet. 

Good Four-Color 
Combinations 

Blue, red. violet and gold. 

Red, chamois, grayish green and 
bluish green. 

Crimson, grayish green, grayish 
pink and straw. 

ALaroon, olive green, pale amber 
and sea green. 

Blue, gold, bluish green and dark 
amber. 

Violet, amber, ultramarine blue and 
deep olive green. 

Dark gray, red, sea green and 
greenish yellow. 

Indigo, citron yellow, grayish blue 
and warm olive. 

Pea green, slate blue, Venetian red 
and pale grayish orange. 

Lemon gold, turquoise, Venetian 
red and bluish green. 

Orange, blue turqoise and warm 
white. 

Ultramarine blue, jasper, dull gold 
and bluish green. — From "The Prac- 
tice of Printing." 

The concluding article on Color 
will appear in the September issue. 
Keep these copies for reference. You 
may wish to improve your dressing 
rooms, sales rooms, or your window 
display. 

^ .^ 
Suggest to customers that they revise 
the old saw, and make it read, "Alake 
pictures while the sun shines." And 
besides it's a lot more fun than mak- 
ing hav. 



10] 



THE FOCUS FOR A T C} T S T 



1930 



No. 20 Fotolite 

A large lighting unit for 
Professional Studios. De- 
signed for the long life, 
low cost, P. S. type of 
bulb, 1,000 or 1,500 watt. 
Stand holds reflector in 
any position up to 9 feet 
high, complete, without 
bulb. 

$35 

1000-wattbulb $6.75 

1500-wattbulb 7.25 

(In photo blue) 




HiRSCH <£f Kaye 



Universal Opaque 

A bright red opaque that will 
not crack, nor become sticky. It 
will spread evenly and a single 
application of the brush will 
cover — can also be applied with 
a pen. Each lot is tested for these 
qualities before shipped to us. 



1 oz. jars $ .25 

4 oz. cans 60 

5 oz. cans 1.00 



Order today and he convinced 



HiRSCH & Kaye 



mmim^smimms^mw 



When Retouching use 

A. W. Faber's - 

The finest pencil made 

17 degrees of hardness 
6 degrees for positive 
1 degree sepia 

Write your needs or tell our salcs/neti 



Lawrence Display Stands - 

A SET of two easel stands bearing the studio slo^jan 
of the National Association, "Photographs Li\e 
Forever." These stands are well finished in black, 
and silver and measure 2 inches high bv 6 inc'ics 
wide. They will support mounted photographs up to 
about 11x14 inches. 

Price, per set of two, $1.50 
HiRSCH <^ Kaye 




pH(nX)G_.!^THS^ 



THE FOCUS FOR A U () U S T 



1930 



[11 



-4>- 



Mural Decoration by Photography 



Increasing to an almost unlimited 
extent the possibilities for unusual 
wall decoration, a new medium — 
photographic murals — has made its 
appearance as a result of recent ex- 
periments by the Eastman Kodak 
Company. A photographic mural is, 
as its name implies, wall paper made 
photographically. It is specially treat- 
ed paper upon which a scene that has 
been photographed from a book or 
magazine illustration, an original 
painting, map, etc., is printed by the 
projection method. The result is an 
artistic print which was exposed and 
developed in the same manner as any 
photographic enlargement. 

Think for a moment what this new 
method of decorating with enlarged 
photograph means! So wide is the 
choice of subjects that it is incon- 
ceivable to imagine a problem of wall 
ornamentation that cannot be solved 
by this process. Among the sources for 
pictures that can be utilized are pho- 
tographs, drawings, paintings and pic- 
tures from books and magazines. End- 
less are the novel effects possible by 
photographic murals. For instance, a 
commonplace bit of woodland re- 
corded through soft focus lense can 
become a subject of rare beauty for 
the walls of dining room or hall. Or 
the wall decoration may record the 
owner's hobby with pictures of hunt- 
ing scenes, ships, golf or gardens. An 
instance of giving a personal touch to 
a room by this method can be seen in 
a country house in upper New York 
State where the dining room walls are 
decorated with enlarged photographs 
of members and scenes of the Genesee 
Valley Hunt Club. These pictures are 
combined to depict a meet and are 



joined to make one continuous hunt- 
ing scene around the room. 

In another interior, the living room 
of an English family residing in Amer- 
ica, photographic murals depicting 
scenes of their ancestral home in Eng- 
land fittingly ornament the walls in 
panel effect. Another instance shows 
a wash drawing of conventional de- 
sign photographed for the background 
of a boudoir, thus giving originality 
to the scheme without expensive treat- 
ment of the whole wall by the artist. 

These are only a few examples of 
the efifects possible through this new 
medium. It offers the heretofore un- 
heard-of possibility of selecting a rare 
print, etching or map and having its 
subtle beauty photographed in diffused 
and enlarged proportions and made 
into wall paper that gives marked 
individuality wherever it is used. 
Because of the range of subjects this 
treatment is adaptable to all types 
of rooms — business offices, restaurants 
and shops, as well as the private resi- 
dences. 

The beauty of photographic murals 
can be enhanced by projecting the 
negative through bolting cloth. The 
resulting print reveals a cloth or tap- 
estry effect in white tones which in 
addition to breaking up the grain of 
the negative gives a soft, pastel ap- 
pearance. In cases where a half-tone 
or other engraving has been copied for 
projection, the engraver's screen is 
artistically apparent, giving the fin- 
ished print somewhat the look of 
hand-blocked wall paper. 

[If interested in this process, write 
for a copy of Photographic Murals. 
We will obtain it for you if you 
wish.} 



12] 



THE FOCI'S FOR A I' GUST • 1930 



Professional Service 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San Francisco 

Room 420 Phone PRospect 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

Carefully Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

Matilda S. Ransdell 

3100 Fulton Street 
B Ay view 4584 San Francisco 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Qualit}- and Service. 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 

and Photo Coloring. Opal 

Miniatures 



MAUD B. COREY 



2916 fteincr Street 



San Francisco, Calif. 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity- 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service. Work Guar- 
anteed. 



J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 



86 Third Street 



San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artisticall}' done in real oils or 
tints — from one to quantities. 



RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do yuiir retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 



EVER READY SERVICE 



Phone GRavstone 7912 



12S5 Gearv Street 



THE FOCUS FOR ATOUST 



1930 



[13 



25 Years Ago 

Once in a while an editor is permit- 
ted liberties with his articles, and if 
the deviation is of sufficient interest 
to the readers, variety is permissible. 
This month, the editor of The Focus 
turns back to pages of time to re- 
call conditions as they existed 25 years 
ago. 

On August 5, 1905, a very small 
boy, just arrived in San Francisco 
from Brooklyn, N. Y., applied for 
work at the Sunset Bazaar, 42 Third 
Street, and was accepted. Some read- 
ers will recall the place. The hours 
of employment were the usual ones of 
that time, 7 :30 A.M. to 6 p.m. or later. 
On Saturdays, it was 11 P.M. before 
we called it a day. During December, 
there were at least two weeks of these 
long days. 

Compare conditions then, with con- 
ditions of today, the hours, and stand- 
ard of values. Salary, $3.00 per week, 
and if I didn't like the job I could 
quit. Kegs of hypo and cases of 5x7 
Stanley plates were delivered without 
question or argument via boy and 
hand truck. To do so today requires 
tact and diplomacy that would land 
a disarmament treaty. 

It was a poor errand boy who 
couldn't "knock down" enough car- 
fare in those days to pay for his lunch. 
Most of the cars were of the cable 
variety, not pay as you enter, and 
whenever the conductor collected 
fares, we just jumped off and climbed 
on the other end. 

And what lunches we had ! I recall 
the little home cooking place at Third 
and Mission where we could get a 
steak or chops, mashed potatoes, a veg- 
etable, and dessert and drink for 15 
cents. And how how good they tasted ! 
For five cents I could buy enough 



chews to exercise my jaws all day long. 

Tintypes were still popular those 
days. I remember the tintype gallery 
at the Chutes, then located at Tenth 
Avenue and Fulton Street. To make 
delivery of a case of tintype plates, 
we would put them on a yellow 
(McAllister Street) cable car at 
Third and Market, phone the number 
of the car to the customer, and an 
hour or so later, the car would arrive 
at the Chutes and the plates would 
be removed. That delivery still stands 
out in my mind as simple efficiency. 

Speaking of tintypes reminds me of 
some of the items that were considered 
essential to studio equipment at that 
time. 

Head rests, kerosene lamps, Dixie 
Vignettes, oval brass forms, photog- 
raphers' tents, Klay holders, burnish- 
ers, Florentine and paper machc 
chairs. Aristo Platino, Aristo Jr., and 
Aristo Proof papers. Tissue enclos- 
ures and many other items could be 
added to this list. How many of these 
do you recall and how many have you 
actually used ? 

I recall that during the rainy sea- 
son, whenever the sun did shine, we 
had numei'ous rush orders for proof 
paper, as proofs could only be made 
during actual sunshine. 

Prevailing price for pictures was 
$2.50 a dozen for cabinets, Aristo 
prints, solid mounted on black enam- 
eled or maroon gilt edge mounts, 
averaging 6x9 inches. Paris Panels 
were the next size (5j/^x7^), al- 
though a size smaller than cabinet 
known as C.D.V. was fairly popular. 
Life size head and shoulders of dad, 
with his whiskers in all their glory, 
adorned the parlor, with a companion 
picture of mother. 

[ Concluded on page 25 ] 



Illustrative Photography ix Advertlsing 

By Leonard A. Williams, A. R. P. S., Director Visual and Industrial 
Education, State Teachers College, St. Cloud, Minnesota. First in a 
new and rapidly expanding field. No phase of photography has ever 
so completely captured the imagination of all photographers as has 
illustrative work. First because it offers opportunity for profits that are 
greater than ever before; second, because it offers a new market for 
photographs with infinite possibilities of expansion, and third because 
it offers opportunity for doing especially interesting and creative work. 
To enter this field the photographer must learn certain fundamental principles 
which govern the presentation of thoughts and things in pictures, so that the 
picture may be as forceful and arresting as possible. These principles, as well 
as the mechanical means by which they are consummated are thoroughly cov- 
* ered in the text. 

Hitherto there has been no literature in book form on this subject. Illustra- 
tive Photography in Advertising presents a complete course in its field and 
consequently will meet the urgent demand that is the result of the widespread 
interest in this work. 
Cloth bound, $3.00. 

A Treatise ox the Airbrush 

By Frazier and Stine. The most complete book ever written on the 
use of the airbrush. A complete course of lessons, including coloring 
with the airbrush. The only complete book in print on this subject. 
$2.60 postpaid. 

The Art of Retouching Photographic Negatives 

By Johnson. A compilation of the best previous works on this subject, 
including practical directions how to color and finish photographic 
enlargements, etc. The most complete book on retouching in print. 
$2.60 postpaid. 

Commercial Art 

By Wallace. A complete course in commercial art, including drawing, 
design, lettering and poster coloring. Handsomely illustrated and the 
most recent book on the subject. 
$3.10 postpaid. 

Light and Shade and Their Application 

By M. Luckiesh, D.Sc. 260 pages of illustrations and explanation on 
light, its effect and control. A knowledge of its contents is essential to 
good lighting of individual figures as well as groups. The book also 
covers architectural subjects, interior and exterior. A worthy addition 
to your library. 
Price $3.00. 



THE FOCUS FOR A T (; U S T • 1930 



[15 



Backgrounds of New Design 





^40-^Jt- 



8x10, $20.00 

Other sizes, 25c per square foot 
Floorcloth, extra, 15c per square foot 



2470 

For 

Co mm II man, 

Confirmation 

and 

JVeddin(j 

Pictures 



2463 

For 

Groups or 
Individuals 




8x10, $48.00 

Other sizes, 60c per square foot 
Floorcloth, extra, ISc per square foot 



Painted to order at Background Studio 



16] 



THE FOCUS FOR A U G U S T • 1930 




Ouiir Salesmen Tell Us 



Bobby Frederick arrived in the 
Frederick household on May 21. 
With three other children in the 
Frederick family, the little man should 
not be lonesome. We almost forgot to 
mention that his daddy is a meber of 
the firm of Frederick & Burkett, 
commercial photographers in Sacra- 
mento. 

W. C. Matthews has moved to 
his new and greatly enlarged studio 
in Agricultural Hall, University of 
California at Berkeley. Mr. Mat- 
thews is engaged in a most interesting 
and valuable branch of scientific pho- 
tography. 

Hans Roemer, the Roemer Studio, 
Bakersfield, acted as host to the writer 
on a recent sunset sky tour over 
Bakersfield and vicinity. Olthough it 
was Mr. Roemer's first flight, he re- 
mained as undisturbed on spiral turns 
and shai'p banks as a cool cucumber. 

Paul Hanson of the Camera 
Shop, Palo Alto, was called on during 
the month past to photograph Mr. 
Ramon Navarro, the great lover of 
screenland. 

Ramon was a week-end guest at 
one of the estates in the foothills of 
Palo Alto. 

Mr. Hanson reports that the star 



proved to be an excellent subject, 
giving evidence of some previous ex- 
perience before the camera. 

<^ 

Speaking of the Cinema, reminds 
us of a visit that our retail store ex- 
perienced some days ago, when John 
Barrymore dropped in to purchase 
some autochrome plates for a trip in 
the Northland. 

The numerous friends of Harry 
LoviCK will regret to learn of his 
death on August 7, from heart trou- 
ble. For many years, he traveled for 
the Eastman Kodak Co. as a specialist 
in photo finishing. His genial nature, 
his practical knowledge of his business 
and his desire to be of service won 
innumerable friends for his company 
and himself. 

Ben Suen, one of the best known 
photographers in San Francisco's Chi- 
natown, has moved to larger quarters 
at 188 Clay Street. In his new loca- 
tion he will have a more modern stu- 
dio with better facilities to handle his 
steadily growing business. 

When you are not sure that an 
action is right, you maybe sine that 
it is wrong:. 



T HE F O C r S FOR A V G V S T 



1930 



[17 



]VIrs. Leon a Moore has purchased 
the Shinkle studio at Colusa. Mrs. 
Moore at one time was owner of a 
prosperous studio in Placerville. 

Donald S. Main of the Main Stu- 
dio, Visalia, had more than his share 
of hard luck recently. His wife has 
been ill for some time and went to 
visit her home in Montana to recu- 
perate, and while she was away, he 
fell down a flight of stairs and spent 
several days in a hospital. Even after 
his return to the studio, he could do 
very little for several daj^s. Here's 
hoping the jinx or hoodoo has been 
broken and the parts lost. 

BEATTIE'S 

LIGHTING AND NEGATIVE 

MAKING COURSES 

Correspondence Course — This course will 
embrace the work given in the regular 
studio or personal program, and will in- 
clude 8x10 prints, with directions and dia- 
(jrams for making the lightings. Twelve 
perfect 8x10 negatives have been selected 
for this course, and the prints, on best 
grade portrait paper, will be mailed — two 
prints at a time — at intervals of two weeks, 
for three months. Prints or proofs on matte 
paper, to be sent in every two weeks to 
Mr. Beattie who will make criticisms and 
suggestions for correspondents" further in- 
struction. The first lesson, consisting of 
two prints, directions and diagrams, in- 
cludes general instruction for making well 
rounded lightings — avoiding abrupt and 
disagreeable shadows — size of light source 
or area in relation to distance from sub- 
ject. Photographic quality of daylight and 
of artificial. Light mixtures and what to 
avoid. Light quality in relation to negative 
(luality. Perfect gradation in the lighting 
and in the negative. Panchromatic ma- 
terial — what is gained and lost in portrait- 
ure. Judging density in the dark room — 
of all materials. The lens — sharp and dif- 
fused focus. Compositon. 

Price of the Course 

$15.00 

f^end your enrollment to 

HiRscH ^ Kaye 



Credit Where Credit 
Is Due 

The interesting picture that appeared 
on the front page of the July issue 
was made and furnished by Henry 
Sackrider, Marysville. The printer 
found it necessary to shorten the col- 
umn in which the article appeared and 
the lines containing this mention were 
di'opped. 

We want IVIr. Sackrider to know 
we appreciate his contribution to The 
Focus. 

Gilroy Photographer Shoots 

Deer-Killing Lioness 

After developing snapshots all week, 
C. J. GiESiNiAN, San Francisco photo 
finisher took a snapshot with a 30-30 
rifle at Gilroy, on August 3. His 
score was one 150-pound, deer-killing 
lioness, one of the biggest seen in the 
state for some time. There is a state 
bounty of $30.00 and a county bounty 
of a similar amount on the heads of 
mountain lions and lionesses. Moun- 
tain lions are individually credited 
with killing 200 deer each season, in 
addition to stray cattle and sheep. 

The State of California for a long 
time has had a paid lion killer, who 
does nothing else but seek to extermi- 
nate the furry slayers. Farmers in the 
vicinity of Gilroy have lost consider- 
able stock, and, following clues which 
they furnished, Giesman came upon 
his quarry in a tree. 

Mr. Giesman, who is owner of the 
Mission Photo Finishing Co., 6 Ra- 
mona Street, spends his summers hunt- 
ing. This is his first mountain lion. 
The animal had a tail nearly four feet 
in length. 

Recipe for having friends: 13 one! 



18] 



THE FOCUS FOR A T (} T S T 



1 930 




Metal Frames 

Here is a frame you have not seen before. 
Made for Zy^x^y^ ovals. The material used 
is heavy bronze (not plated) and the padded 
back is supplied with an easel. The glass is 
convex. 

This is a very attractive style that will sell 
readily. 

STYLE ILLIAD 

$2.00 

(Less your usual discount) 



^ 



Order your holiday supply notv, frot 

HiRSCH & Kaye 



THE FOCTS FOR ATCirST 



1930 



[19 



Architectural Pictures 

If you have occasion to make pictures 
of architectural subjects, make them 
on Velour Black (or Iris) Maroquin. 
This paper is furnished in white or 
buf¥ stock. 

The surface resembles a high grade 
of leather with a very fine tooth, and 
a slight shine. Imagine how well this 
paper can be used for such scenes as 
the high school, ntw residences, the 
new theatre, and especiallv, buildings 
of Spanish type. 

Maroquin is supplied in Velour 
Black for projection and Iris for con- 
tact prints, buff or white stock. Order 
a dozen, make some prints, and you'll 
be surprised — and pleased. 

To Make Fingers Look 
Slender — 
There are a few simple rules. The 
hands should be placed to look long 
and slender. This effect is most read- 
ily obtained by having the edge of 
the hand toward the camera. Do not 
show any more of the knuckles than 
necessary. Do not bend the first finger 
at the knuckle joint, as the finger then 
makes a short line and looks small or 
stubby. Extend the straight line of 
this finger up to where it joins the 
thumb, then the line is long and the 
finger looks slender. One or more of 
the other fingers may be turned under 
and hidden, the effect of this being to 
make the hand look smaller. A little 
practice will enable the photographer 
to pose the hands with good effect. 

Check back over your order files or 
negative files of three to five or six 
years ago. List the persons shown 
there for whom you have not taken a 
photograph for several years. Make a 



check-up to see what their address is 
now. Use the city directory, and tele- 
phone directory. Then get out a 
special letter to each of these persons, 
mentioning the fact that you photo- 
graphed him a year or so ago. Play up 
the need for frequent photographs as 
part of a permanent family record. 
Wait a week or ten days. Follow this 
letter with another, and a third a 
week later. 

Eastman Film Deal 

The Eastman Kodak Company an- 
nounces their No. 401 Kodak film 
assortment. Each package will contain 
the following: 

2+ Rolls Eastman Film No. 116 

24 Rolls Eastman Film No. 120 

6 Rolls Eastman Film No. 127 

6 Rolls Eastman Film No. 122 

The film will be supplied in an 
attractive container, packed ready for 
shipment. The retail value of this as- 
sortment is $18.00, and is offered for 
resale purpose for $12.00. 

Here is an assortment of the most 
popular film in the right proportions 
and an attractive display case, without 
extra cost to you. Order your No. 401 
Eastman Film Deal from Hirsch <5 
Kave, your logical source of supply. 

George Eastman Will Aid 
in Celebration 

George EastiMan of Rochester, liead 
of the Eastman Kodak Company, was 
appointed by President Hoover as a 
member of the George Washington 
Bicentennial Commission. 

He succeeds Hanford MacNider of 
Iowa who has been named minister 
to Canada. 

The bicentennial commission is ar- 
ranging plans for the George Wasli- 
ington celebration in 1932. 



20 ] 



THE F O C I' S FOR A I^ G U S T 



1930 




The New 



Ingento Photo Mailer - 



Made in the Followhifj 
Popular Sizes 



SIZES I- 



Has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gummed flap, making it possible 
to mail photos to foreign countries or send 
them by first-class mail when privacy or addi- 
tional safety is desired. 

The Ingento is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking 
photographs, drawings, sketches or any other valu- 
able matter when this mailer is used, as the}' are 
perfectl}' preserved by the double corrugated board 
which covers the photograph or drawing both front 
and back. The capacity of this mailer is greater than 
others and it is more quickly sealed. The various 
sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popu- 
lar up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios 
throughout the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now- 
made 8^xllJ/4 inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8x10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board: it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 

Manufactured by Burke & James, Inc., Chicago, Illinois 
Carried in Stock by Hirsch & Kaye 
OR ANY NEED.' PRICES NONE CAN MEET.'' PROMPT SHIPMENTS.'' 



No. 
No. 

No. 
*No. 
*No. 
*No. 



5/2 X 75/s 

63/4^ Wa 
7/2 X 91/2 
83/^ X 101/2 

101/4 X uyk 



1 - 121/4 X 141/4 

*No. 8 1014x15 

No. 9 6^x 9^ 

*No. 10 7^/4x115^ 

*No. 11 81/4x111/4 

12 13 X 171/4 

14 16 x20/i 

*Packed in cartons 
containing fifty 



^No. 
No. 



From llie Melting Pot to Your 
Bank Account 

ALBO 



Gets all the silver from your Hypo 
Solution. The ideal precipitant — 
clean, odorless, speedy, complete re- 
covery. $3.00 for 5-lb. can. Full di- 
rections enclosed. 

Prepared by Wildberg Bros. 
Smelting & Refining Co., San Fran- 
cisco, who will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price. 



§ 



Distributed by 

Hirsch & Kaye 



Stop 
Waste- 
Reduce 
Labor & 
Expense 



Install STERLING Dc-vehpin,, 
Tanks for Amateur Finishing, Com- 
mercial and Professional Work. Lo\v 
Cost. Low Upkeep. Best Results. 
Made of the very finest porcelain 
enamel. 

Turns out enormous amount of 
work daily. Best by Test. Ask for 
Circular. 

Sterling 
Photo Mfg. Co. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



T H E FOC r S FOR A r (; U ST .1930 [21 
^ 

Announcement of Awards in $20,000 
P, A. A, Contest 

INTERNATIONAL AWARDS 

The Loveliest Mothers " 
First Prize, $1,500— Mns. IVIartha Curran Gray, 117 West Franklin 
Avenue, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Second Prize, $500— M rs. Blanche Rusby, 291 E. Forest Street, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Third Prize, $250— Mrs. J. Ernest Schiller, 328 Welleslev Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Most Attraetive (jhildren 
First Prize, $1,500 — John Raymond LeHuquet, 1874 Forrester Street, 
Victoria, B. C. 

Second Prize, $500 — Marguerite Connablc, 1615 Linden Street, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. 

Third Prize — $250 — Homer Arthur Hinklcv, 682 Western Avenue, 
Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Pdvtial list of other ivinners — Pacific Coast states only 
How many do you recognize? 

SECTIONAL AWARDS 
" The Loveliest Mothers " 

WESTERN SECTION 

First Prize, $100— Mrs. Howard McKean, 1003 W. Sixth St., Austin, Tex. 
Second Prizes, $50 each — Mrs. J. Fransham, Bozeman, Mont. ; Mrs. Zeph Jones, 
Ogden, Utah ; Mrs. Vernie Kay, Hollywood, Calif. ; Mrs. Sarah Weavers, Boul- 
der, Colo. ; Mrs. Francis C. Wilson, Santa Fe, N. Mex. 

Third Prizes, $25— Mrs. Edalene Auson, Salt Lake City, Utah; Mrs. F. C. Bailey, 
Caldwell, Idaho; Mrs. C. L. Flick, Portland, Ore.; Mrs. James B. Green, Port- 
land, Ore.; Mrs. John C. Keys, Long Beach, Calif.; Mrs. Alvine W. Lyon, Holly- 
wood, Calif.; Mrs. G. W. Lyle, Portland, Ore.; Mrs. G. G. Morris, Portland, 
Ore.; Mrs. Kathleen Mary Oswald, Gladstone, Ore.; Mrs. Victory Remirez, San 
Francisco, Calif.; Mrs. Albert H. Webb, Jr., Los Angeles, Calif.; Mrs. Marv R. 
White, Oakland, Calif. 

" The Most Attractive Children " 

WESTERN SECTION 

First Prize, $100— Nancy Scarfe, 1+84 Poplar Ave., Fresno, Calif. 
Second Prizes, $50 — Elaine Rae Arons, Phoenix, Ariz. ; Mary Naomi Dallon, 
Boise, Idaho; Noeine Du. McCowan, Phoenix, Ariz.; Shirley McCraskey, Colfax, 
\A'ash. ; Donald Moore, Seattle, Wash. ; Joan Perkins, Visalia, Calif. ; Frances 
Margaret Smith, Seattle, Wash. ; Joseph Roustadt Smith, Tucson, Ariz. ; Mar\ ly 
Stephenson, Oakland, Calif. 

Third Prizes, $25 — Philip Jackson Blackman, San Diego, Calif.; Margaret Al- 
berta Condron, Tucson, Ariz.; Joan Asbahr, Corvallis, Ore.; Carolyn Jane Eagle- 
son, Boise, Idaho; Paul Evans, Hollywood, Calif.; AUice Patricia Fitzsimons, Los 
Angeles, Calif. ; Richard James (Gardner, Tacoma, Wash. ; Richard James (jodin 
II, Seattle, Wash.; Jane Evelyn Knipper, Santa Barbara, Calif.; Lora Cirace 
Edith Laslett, Corvallis, Ore.; Bertha Rose Stastny, Seattle, Wash. 

We regret that we have no list of the photographers whose pictures won 
prizes. We understand that Kathleen Dougan, Berkeley, made the pic- 
ture that won first prize of the western children's section as well as two 
others, and F. A. Webster, Oakland, made a prize-winning picture. 



22 ] 



THE F O C r S FOR A V C, V S T 



1930 




1930 Fall Styles 



In tune with the times 

THE VOGUE 



o o o o 



Just the style needed in these days to attract business 
from the younger generation and the j'^oung-old folks, who 
refuse to grow old and want the modern. 

Each size is supplied in Grey and Neutral and has a 
different type of opening, ornamentation and coloring. 

Sizes .... 3x4 3x4>^ 4x6 
Price per 100 . . $9.00 $10.50 $13.50 

Many thousands will be sold this season for the gift 
and exchange portraits. Remember, you do not have to 
"stock up" — your stockhouse takes care of your orders, 
may they be small or large . . . but try out the new. 

Samples of all three sizes for fifteen cents. Start 
featuring this advanced style early in the season. 
It will start things. SAMPLE OFFER F-29. 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



THE FOCUS FOR ATCJUST • 1930 



[ 23 



er r y s 






















Comer 



Ih Himself 



For a long time I've been listeninjj; to 
Amos and And)', and expecting the 
old cab to break down. I got some 
good ideas for the boys, no charge. 
Here they are. 

When the cab stops running, they 
can't do anything else, so they start 
a photo studio. Andy is president, 
operator and head of everything. 

Amos could be the developer, 
printer, porter, errand boy and everv- 
thing, besides assistant bookkeeper. 

The stock house would want $100 
down on the order for cameras, etc. 
Hoho! No money for plates or paper, 
but the Kingfish would drop in, hear 
about it and offer to buy the out- 
dated plates Andy told him about. 
This would make the Kingfish a part- 
ner in the studio. . . . Don't forget 
that Mrs, Kingfish would get the job 
of cashier. 

^< 

Can't you imagine Andy getting 
regusted and telling Amos the stock 
house sent the wrong camera because 
everything is upside down when he 
looks at it? 

Meanwhile, the Kingfish has been 
watching a competitor down the 
street, and decides to put out and sell 
a ticket. A dollar on the ticket and 
twenty-five cents at the studio. 



After a while, Andy gets a bright 
idea. He figures up the rent. Seven 
million, eight million, and he feels he 
has to cut the overhead and under- 
head, and if they could find somebody 
to rent part of the store, they would 
reclare a dividend and maybe com- 
pound semi-annual. Amos would like 
the idea, so Andy goes out to get a 
tenant and brings in 

Madam Queen, who will hereafter 
and after that operate a Beauty 
Shoppe on one side of the studio. So 
far Andy would be the operator, but 
one day the Madam would see Andy 
arranging the drapes on a girl what 
wants a picture taken, and Madam 
Queen starts a row. They give the 
Aladam a interest in the studio to 
keep her quiet so she figures she will 
hire the operator, so she gets 

Good-Looking, a well-dressed 
young man who has been a good cus- 
tomer, to do the operating. 

Lightning has been coming around 
and giving the distress signal, so the 
Kingfish writes a recommendation 
and Lightning gets a job as errand 
boy for the stock house. 

As for Amos' dog, all he's good for 
in this story is to bite the stock house 
collector and so keep the boys in 
business a while longer. A-wah — ! 

Jerrv. 




Portrait by Leo W. Falls, 
Orlando, Fla. 



A CHARMING subject that 
' ^ tugs at your hedrtstrings, 
d properly adoring pdrent, d 
thoroughly competent Cdmerd 
man with the deftness o\ a Rne 
technician, a good film/ — all re- 
sulting in a negative which is 
truly a work of art. And then 
— the choice of paper. 

Can any paper be too good 
for such a job — for any job 
that a photographer wants to 
be known by? 



Can 

a paper 

be too 

good? 



Our dnswer is No — dnd 
thdt fine emulsion quality is 
accordingly/ at all timeS/ our 
paramount duty to photograph- 
ers in the manufacture of — 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPERS 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



THE FOCI'S FOR A T Ci C S T 



1930 



[25 



25 Years A(jo 

\ Concluded from page 1 3 ] 

Most of the studios were east of 
Sixth Street, although I recall one 
or two near Ninth and Market. I can 
understand how a person can forget a 
transaction that is advantageous and 
always remember one that is other- 
wise. About 10 days before the fire 
of 1906, I had some confirmation pic- 
tures made by a photographer on 
Stockton Street, opposite where Roos 
Bros, are now located, and paid the 
full price of $2.50 in advance. I re- 
ceived but four pictures as the fire 
destroyed the studio before my order 
was completed. As I now behold one 
of them, and see the evidence of head 
rest, the artificial flowers, and the 
do-or-die look on my face, I wish all 
the copies had been consumed. But for 
years, I felt I had been short-changed. 

The great fire of April, 1906, tem- 
porarily threw me out of employment, 
so I went to work making solio prints 
for P. F. Dana at Webster and Ellis 
Streets. Printing was done on a gravel 
roof and I managed somehow to get 
enough gravel on the print frames to 
break many of his most precious nega- 
tives of the fire. No doul^, he was 
glad when I rejoined the Sunset or- 
ganization, first in Oakland, then on 
Van Ness Avenue. Meanwhile, I had 
cultivated the acquaintance of several 
Hirsch <S: Kaye employees and felt 
that I would like to make a change. 
So on December 8, 1906, I went to 
work for Hirsch & Kaye. 

The old-fashioned gallery, with its 
skylight, upstairs location, and de- 
pendence on sunlight has practically 
disappeared. In its place, I find mod- 
ern stores and studios, in which dig- 
nity and the sentiment of pictures are 
reflected. The tintype has yielded its 



place to pictures in color, both still 
and movie. Talking film is accepted 
as commonplace. Television has ar- 
rived. Incidentally, I have seen the 
Hiisch & Kaye organization expand 
from five or six people to more than 
sixty. What will the next 25 years 
bring ? 

People like to do what they see 
other people doing — what they like 
to do. When you suggest picture 
making to one of your customers, 
therefore, and he becomes a camera 
convert, the example he sets encour- 
ages countless others to follow suit. 
That means good business . . . and 
that's what ive both like. 

Sweetest Words 

By V^'ai.t Mason' 

"Inclosed find check!" The sweetest 
thing that e'er outclassed the song of 
birds! How they allay the widow's 
fears, and dry the orphan's briny 
tears! When sad and tired and short 
of kale, a letter comes by morning 
mail ; like other letters it appears, with 
postage stamp and inky smears. "No 
doubt," we sigh, "it is a dun ; some 
frantic gent is after mon. These 
beastly bills we cannot pay take all 
the sunshine from the day, and make 
us wish that we were dead, with 
stacks of granite overhead." And then, 
with languid hands we tear the en- 
velope to see what's there, and out 
there conies a note, by heck, with these 
brave words. "Inclosed find check!" 
Ah, then we bid farewell to woe, and 
like nine Brahma roosters crow, and 
to the soft drinks joint repair, and 
buy a quart of soapsuds there. The 
sun once more is cutting hay, the 
gloomy clouds are blown away, the 
world is glad that was a wreck, 
changed by the words: "Inclosed find 
check" 



26 ] 



THE FOCrS FOR A T (i T S T 



1930 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For sale by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



Charcoal Black 

An unusual paper for Projection Printing. Designed 
for those who wish their prints to command atten- 
tion and produce new business. Grade "A" thin 
parchment — Grade "B" medium weight parchment. 
Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, 3.25. 

Order from HiRSCH & KAYE 




Forging Ahead 



For almost half a century Hammer-made emulsions 
have found and are still finding a ready market 
because — - 

It's so easy to select a special brand for any picture 
you are called on to make,- — it's so easy to make 
better photographs than the ones you thought were 
best. 

''Photographs tell the story" 

Write for frrr portfolio of prints 



HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



159 West 22nci St., 
New York Citv 



Ohio Ave. &: Miami Si. 
St. I.oiiis 



'['HE FOCrS FOR A F C, U S T 



1930 



[27 



Postage on Back Orders 

OccASioxALLV, a customer complains 
that because of a back order, he had 
to pay additional postage. While we 
regret back orders and would like 
to make them unnecessary, the fact 
remains that as the supply of material 
becomes more complex, and in excess 
of demand, back orders are inevitable. 
We especially refer to papers and 
sensitized products. 

It must be remembered that an 
item back ordered makes the original 
shipment that much lighter. A recent 
letter on this subject caused us to 
investigate as to excessive postage, and 
the results are here published. The 
original order weighed 10 pounds and 
the back order, 2 pounds. The differ- 
ence in cost is very slight, as you will 
see. 

The larger the packages and the 
farther the distance, the less noticeable 
the difference. When you recall that 
immediate shipment of the major part 
of your order means a saving in time 
of one or several days in the arrival 
of the goods, the difference will be 
a small item. In fact, considering the 
cost of handling the order twice, fill- 
ing, shipping and billing, the cost to 
us is very much more than the .slight 
difference in postage. 

1st Zone — 50 miles from San Francisco: 
One Sliipnwnt Tivo Shipments 

10 pounds, .16 
2 pounds, .08 

12 pounds, .18 .24 

2nd Zone — 150 miles from San Francisco: 
10 pounds, .16 
2 pounds, .08 

12 pounds, .18 .24 

3rd Zone — 300 miles from San Francisco: 
10 pounds, .26 
2 pounds, .10 



12 pounds, .30 



.36 



4th Zone — 600 miles from San Francisco: 
10 pounds, .44 
2 pounds, .12 

12 pounds, .52 .56 

Truck Freight 
Readers located in Fresno and all 
points south will be interested in im- 
proved motor truck transportation fa- 
cilities now available. 

For shipments to Fresno and Valley 
points south, a direct prompt service 
is available as the trucks will leave 
San Francisco terminal daily at 4 P.M. 
They arrive in Fresno at 3 a.m., 
where freight is transferred to con- 
necting lines for points farther south 
and are delivered the same day. 

If you wish to use this truck service 
for transportation of your orders, 
specify Valley Motor Lines, and re- 
member that your order should reach 
us at least one hour before the truck 
leaves. 

Most people are eye-minded. In other 
words, their minds respond quicker to 
buying suggestions made to their eyes, 
than to appeals made to their ears. 

Give these folks an eyeful of win- 
dow displays featuring Kodak film 
and photo finishing — you'll find it 
mighty profitable. 

Work 

I extend pitv to no man because he 
has to work. If he is worth his salt, 
he icill work. I envy the man who has 
work worth doing and does it well. 
There never has been devised, and 
there never will be devised, any law 
which will enable a man to succeed 
save by the exercise of those qualities 
which have always been the prerequi- 
sites'of success — the qualities of hard 
work, of keen intelligence, of uiiHinch- 
ins will. — ^ Theodore Roosevelt. 



28 ] 




TH F 


FOCr S FOR AV GV ST 


• 193 





J, 


r 


r isted 


at 


the Service 


1 ))es k 






Are you looking foj 


a Studio location? Is 


your Studio for 






Sa 


le? Are 


you seeking compete? 


t he 


ip? 






All of these 


problems are answered in these columns. We have insuffi- 






cient space to 


list all the 


Studios offered for sale, and for 1 


:he same reason 






are unable to 


give c 


ompl 


ete descriptions. If interested, get in touch with 






the HiRSCH 


cf Kaye Service Desk. We'll be deli 


ghtec 


to assist you. 






There is no charge 


'or listing your business for sale 


in The Focus. 






Studios are 


avail 


ible in these locations : 
















California 










Alaheim 


Box 2247, 


The Focus Salinas 


...Box 


2215, The Focus 






Berkeley 


Box 


2272, 


The Focus San Francisco.... 


...Box 


2235, The Focus 






Holl}'wood 


....Box 


2248, 


The Focus San Francisco..... 


...Box 


2251, The Focus 






Jackson 


....Box 


2268, 


The Focus San Francisco.... 


...Box 


2231, The Focus 






Los Angeles 


Box 


2211, 


The Focus San Francisco 


...Box 


2256, The Focus 






Madera 


Box 


2228, 


The Focus San Francisco.... 


...Box 


2266, The Focus 






Miranda 


Box 


2250, 


The Focus San Jose 


...Box 


2222, The Focus 






Monterey 


Box 


2269, 


The Focus San Jose 


...Box 


2261, The Focus 






Oakland 


.....Box 2143, 


The Focus Santa Cruz 


...Box 


2249, The Focus 






Oakland 


.....Box 


2260, 


The Focus Santa Paula 


...Box 


2164, The Focus 






Pismo Beach.... 


Box 


2232, 


The Focus Selma 


...Box 


2243, The Focus 






Pomona 


Box 


2224, 


The Focus Stockton 


...Box 


2239, The Focus 






Redding 


Box 


2258, 


The Focus Taft 


...Box 


2267, The Focus 






Richmond 


Box 


2226, 


The Focus 

Oregon 










Ashland 


Box 


2089, 


The Focus Freewater 


....Box 


2097, The Focus 






Baker 


Box 


2087, 


The Focus Portland 


....Box 


2265, The Focus 






Bend 


Box 


2209, 


The Focus 

Washlngton 










Colville 


Box 


2254, 


The Focus Snohomish 


....Box 


2086, The Focus 






Concrete 


Box 


2123, 


The Focus Seattle 


....Box 


2137, The Focus 






Olympia 


....Box 


2210, 


The Focus Spokane 

Nevada 


...Box 


2271, The Focus 






McGill 


Box 


2095, 


The Focus Reno 

Utah 


...Box 


2125, The Focus 






Salt Lake City. 


Box 


2230, 


The Focus 














Arizona — New Mexico 










Kingman, Ariz 


Box 


2263, 


The Focus Las Cruces, N. M..Box 


2217, The Focus 






Morenci, Ariz.. 


Box 


2255 


The Focus 









THE FOCrS FOR A U (i U S T • 1930 



[29 



faies 




Remodeled Victor Flash Cablnet 

Light area 47x70, good condition. Here 
is a low-priced lighting outfit that re- 
quires no wiring installations, and the 
cost of operation is so low you can 
hardly estimate it. 
Bargain Price ^25.00 

Here Is Another Victor Cabinet 

Remodeled for Mazda Lamp use. Wired 
for 4-1000 watt and 2-500 watt clear 
Mazda lamps which are supplied with 
the cabinet. An excellent light. 
Bargain Price ^45.00 

5x7 Centurv Portrait Camera 

On Century Studio Stand, fitted with 3^ 
inch Silent Shutter. Modern back for 
5x7 double holders. 
Bargain Price ^35.00 

Hali.dorson Studio Cabinet 

With 4 1500-watt Photo Blue Mazda 
lamps. An excellent lighting unit for 
individual figures or groups. Each lamp 
on its own switch. 

Bargain Price ^80.00 

(Terms, if Avanted) 



19E Parralax Reflector 
With lamp and cord. This makes a pow- 
erful lighting unit when placed behind 
a camera for enlarging. 
Bargain Price ^27.50 

Duplex Jr. Twin Arc Lamp 

A powerful twin arc that operates in 
two stages of intensity on ordinary wir- 
ing circuit. Portable and readily carried 
about. 
Bargain Price ^42.50 

8x10 Studio Camera 

On No. 4 Century Stand. Includes 8x10 
curtain slide holder and modern 5x7 
back for double holders. 
Bargain Price ^42.00 

Eastman Studio Reflector 

Increases the strength of your light, im- 
proves your modeling. 
Bargain Price ^18.50 

12-iN. Emerson Fan (A.C.) 

With hot breeze heating coil attachment. 
Bargain Price ^19.50 

8x10 Ansco Printer 
Like new. 
Bargain Price ^32.50 

30-iN. Halldorson Print Washer 

(Horizontal.) So designed that it is im- 
possible for prints to bunch in center. 
Bargain Price ^16.50 

Print Frames 

4x5 heavv, piano-hinged. 

Each ^.20 

Wood Negative Racks 

With capacity of 25 plates up to GlA 

Each ^ .13 

Clergy Flash Guns 

Last year's models, but new. Ignited by 

primer. 

Each ^15.00 

Pocket Photo Mirror Machine 

Complete with a liberal suppl\' of mir- 
rors, backs, celluloid and easel handles. 
An excellent novelty. Very easily op- 
erated. Write for circular and a sample 
mirror. 

Bargain price (very reasonable) on ap- 
plication. 



HiRSCH & Kaye 

SAN FRANCISCO 



30] T H E FOC r S FOR AUG r ST -1930 



Yo'j C(in Make the Best Ne(jatives 
of Your Career icith 

DEFENDER 

PORTRAIT FILM 



X 



HERE is speed, gradation and 
latitude in perfect balance to produce the best in 
negative technic. 

The softly bi'illiant scale of the Defender Portrait 
Film negative is fully interpreted in the print. 
Absence of halation and a transparency of film base 
and coating — so exceptional as to give the product 
special distinction — assure a softly brilliant print 
of true portrait quality. 

// you cannot readily locate a source 

of supply for DEFENDER FILM 

— please write us 

DEFENDER 

of Rochester 

DEFENDER FILM: — Portrait, Panchromatic, 

Commercial Ortho is made by Du Po?it-Pathe film 

Manufacturing Corporation, Neiv York City 



Defender Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, N. Y. 




The greatest importance should be at- 
tached to the quality of the paper you use 
and the quality and finish of the prints you 
deliver. Every other photographic material 
you use is a means to this end, but the 
print is the finished product — the only 
thing the customer buys — the one thing 
on w^hich your reputation stands or falls. 

The various brands of Vitava Papers pro- 
duce the finest possible print results with 
consistent uniformity. Rich warm tones and 
beautiful surface textures in ample variety. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




The long scale of Eastman Portrait Film en- 
ables you to reproduce a brilliant lighting from 
highlight to shadow without skipping a tone. 
And due to the absence of halation there is 
always that sparkle and delicate detail in the 
highlights themselves that give texture to the 
whitest drapery or the finest skin. 

It is this quality of film results that has 
made Eastman Portrait Film the outstanding 
negative making material for portrait pho- 
tography. 

Eastman Portrait Film, Par Speed, Super 
Speed and Panchromatic, at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



^A^-j p^^^^^^y^^^^gy^^xM^y^^^^^^^^^ 



THE 



FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of 
Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



JULY, 1930 




PUBLISHED BY HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



H 



€ 



fi 



^^Ji^ 



m^umm^'immsxmi^^^zms^xm^m^mimsm^t 




Portrait by Leo W. Falls, 
Orlando, Fla. 



Can 

a paper 

be too 

good? 



A CHARMING subject that 
tugs at your heartstrings, 
a properly adoring parent, a 
thoroughly competent camera 
man with the deftness of a f'ne 
technician, a good film, — all re- 
sulting in a negative which is 
truly a work of art. And then 
■ — the choice of paper. 

Can any paper be too good 
for such a job — for any job 
that a photographer wants to 
be known by? 



Our answer is No — and 
that fine emulsion quality is 
accordingly, at all times, our 
paramount duty to photograph- 
ers in the manufacture of — 




PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPERS 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



THE FOCUS 

Puhlished Monthly in the Interests of Professional 

Photography by HlRSCH & Kaye 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



JULY, 1930 



No. 7 



In the Profession 




"Five sons in 
phutograpliy' 



How would you like 
to have five sons, all 
engaged in photog- 
raphy? That was the 
experience of Chas. 
W. Clark, whose stu- 
dio is located in the 
I. O. O. F. Building, 
Roseburg, Oregon. 
Mr. Clark is a native of Boiling 
Green, Mo., but you need not "show 
him." He will find out for himself. 
A cigar maker in his youth, he decided 
to take up photography in 1888, in 
the days when a photo gallery con- 
tained an element of mystery to the 
public. Since then, he has had a varied 
experience in various places. Perhaps 
some of you listen to the Memory 
Lane program over your radio, the 
scene of which is laid in Goshen Cen- 
ter, Indiana. During the time these 
scenes are presumed to take place, 
Mr. Clark had a studio at Anderson, 
just 60 miles south. 

Then a studio in Hong Kong, 
China, after which he settled at Rose- 
burg, Oregon. He was a member of 
the Roseburg City Council for six 
years. He is a member of the Elks, 
Masons, and Kiwanis Club. As a vol- 
unteer of the 158th Indiana Infantry, 
he served in the Spanish American 



War and the Philippine Insurrection. 
Although deeply interested in busi- 
ness, especially his own, he finds time 
to enjoy Oregon's hunting and fishing 
pleasures. For indoor sports, he pre- 
fers billiards. His membership in the 
local, regional and national associa- 
tions is an indication of his interest in 
photography, and should you ask him 
what he considers photography's great- 
est need, he will answer: Greater co- 
operation among photographers. 

"These truths I hold to be self- 
evident: That man was made to be 
happy, that happiness is only attain- 
able through useful effort, that the 
very best way to help ourselves is to 
help others, and often the best way to 
help others is to mind our own busi- 
ness." — Elbert Hubbard. 

S 
The failures of life sit around and 
complain; the gods haven't treated 
them white ; they've lost their um- 
brellas whenever it rains, and they 
haven't their lanterns at night ; men 
tire of failures who fill with their 
sighs the air of their neighborhoods; 
there's a man who is greeted with 
love-lighted eyes — he's the man who 
delivers the goods. 

— Farm Market Sayings. 



4] 



THE FOCrS FOR Tl'LY 



1930 




Putz Pomade 

PuTZ Pomade is a smooth woi-king 
friction reducer. As a local reducer 
this preparation is without a peer. It 
is applied with a soft cloth or tuft of 
cotton. Since the action is purely me- 
chanical it is entirely at the command 
of the retoucher at all times. 

The use of Putz Pomade permits 
the operator to reduce any portion of 
the negative to just the exact degree 
desired. The preparation is so fine 
that it may be applied to the most 
delicate portion of the negative, and 
it will never scratch. It reduces 
more evenly because of its smooth 
consistency; morevover, it is indis- 
pensable for bringing up hair, draper- 
ies, and the light portions of the pic- 
ture. 

Putz Pomade is supplied in con- 
venient tins. It never becomes-caked, 
lasts longer than other similar prepa- 
rations, and does not leave the nega- 
tive greasy. Photographers and others 
will be gald to know that this very 
popular reducing paste is now availa- 
ble in our stock. Mr. Beattie rec- 
ommended the use of Putz Pomade, 
during his school of lighting. 

We offer the preparation in con- 
venient three ounce tins for 25 cents 
each. 




Stop 
Waste- 
Reduce 
Labor & 
Expense 



Install STERLING Developing 
Tanks for Amateur Finishing, Com- 
mercial and Professional W^ork. Low 
Cost. Low Upkeep. Best Results. 
Made of the very finest porcelain 
enamel. 

Turns out enormous amount of 
work daily. Best by Test. Ask for 
Circular. 

Sterling 
Photo Mfg. Co. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA. 



ALBO 



Gets all the silver from your Hypo 
Solution. The ideal precipitant — 
clean, odorless, speedy, complete re- 
covery. $3.00 for 5-lb. can. Full di- 
rections enclosed. 

Prepared by Wild berg Bros. 
Smelting & Refining Co., San Fran- 
cisco, who will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price. 



§ 



Distributed by 

HiRSCH & Kaye 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY 



1930 



[5 



Just Suppose 

We read in "Time," that the Gov- 
ernment of Mexico passed a law 
requiring, at once, six pictures of 
every foreigner in Mexico. Three pro- 
file and three full face pictures are 
required for identification and future 
reference. As there are 100,000 for- 
eigners in Mexico, a fourth of whom 
are Americans, the relatively few stu- 
dios enjoyed a rushing business while 
600,000 exposures were made. 

Suppose a law like that should be 
passed in the United States! (There's 
always room for another.) No doubt 
it would momentarily benefit the pho- 
tographic industry, but it is not that 
phase that we are thinking of now. 

It's the number of people who 
would have to be photographed that 
impresses us, and the freedom they 
enjoy (and sometimes abuse). Their 
opportunities to enjoy life, liberty, and 
the pursuit of happiness should make 
us all be glad that we live in the 
land where all men (and women, too) 
are born free and equal. 

And now, lest we acqin're a superi- 
ority complex because we are Amer- 
icans, let us watch how we drive our 
motor cars in or out of traffic, and 
we will realize that in this little 
world, all of life's blessings are fairly 
well divided. 

^ S 
Appreciated 
For the past twenty years, I have had 
the pleasure of dealing with your firm. 
Your courteous tolerance has been a 
distinct and personal favor to me and 
most sincerely appreciated. 

S. E.. Modesto. 



IVORA 

A Neiv Defender Product 

IvoRA is coated on a white film base 
with the regular Velour Black emul- 
sion. It is a product with infinite pos- 
sibilities for those who make minia- 
tures or who want something excep- 
tionally fine for high class portraits 
of larger size than the miniature. 

Ivora takes its name from the smooth 
ivory surface given by the film base. 
The Velour Black emulsion is won- 
derfully effective. Prints have fine 
quality and gradation and are made 
with the same ease and simplicity as 
a paper print. 

Ivora tones either by Hypo-Alum 
or Redevelopment. The tone quality 
is exceptional. The colorist will find 
it ideal for oils and the mechanical 
features leave nothing to be desired. 
Ivora is trimmed for miniature frames 
as easily as paper. 

Ivora is carried in stock in the 
standard sizes listed below. Special 
sizes are obtainable and prices will 
be quoted on request. 

I liar a 

3j4x4>4, per dozen $1.75 list. 

4x5 " " 2.05 " 

5x7 " " 4.20 " 

6j/x8X' " " 6.75 " 

8x10 " " 10.00 " 

Order now, from HiRSCH & Kaye. 

Whenever you are called on to 
make a print more than 40 inches 
wide, remember that 40 inches is prac- 
tically the limit of width in which 
photographic paper is made. Velour 
Black Canvas, however, is furnished 
in 44-inch width, in 5-foot lengths 
(or multiples of 5 feet). HiRSCH & 
Kaye have it in stock. 



6] 



THE FOCV S FOR Jl'LY 



1930 




The Beach Multi-focal Lens, Series A & H 



LENS (QUALITY 

that is unexcelled ^'^^ 

True drawing and full delineation with 
roundness — excellent texture quality — -life 
in the shadows — depth of focus at /3.3 speed 
equal to /5.6 in the usual lens — ease in 
retouching — latitude in timing. 

Visit our booth at the National Convention 
of the P. A. of A. in Milwaukee. Look over 
our print collection and let us tell you more 
about this new lens. 



-^ 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N.Y. 

Maniifaclurrrs of qualily photographic Ini.ws 
and shiillrrs since 1S99 



THE FOCUS FOR J U L Y 



1930 



[7 



We Envy That 
Centurion 

"The real trouble Avith the world 
today is a moral trouble," said a 
thoughtful man recently. "A large 
proportion of its people have lost all 
conception of what it means to render 
an adequate service in return for the 
wages they are paid." 

He is a generous man. On almost 
any sort of question his sympathies 
are likely to be with labor, and so are 
mine. I am glad that men work 
shorter hours than they used to, and 
in certain instances I think the hours 
should be even .shorter. I am glad they 
are paid higher wages, and hope they 
may earn still more. 

But there are times when my sym- 
pathy goes out to those in whose be- 
half no voice is ever raised — to the 
executives of the \vorld, whose hours 
are limited only by the limit of their 
physical and mental endurance, who 
carry not merely the load of their own 
work but the heart-breaking load of 
carelessness and stolid indifference in 
so many of the folks whom they em- 
ploy. 

Perhaps the most successful execu- 
tive in history was that centurion of 
the Bible. 

"For I am a man of authority, 
having soldiers under me," he said. 
"And I say to this man Go, and he 
goeth ; and to another Come, and he 
Cometh ; and to my servant, Do this, 
and he doeth it." 

Marvelous man ! 

The modern employer also says 
"Go," and too often the man who 
should have gone will appear a day or 
two later and explain, "I didn't 
understand what you meant." He says 
"Come," and at the appointed time 
his telephone rings and a voice speaks, 



saying: "I overslept and will be there 
in about three-quarters of an hour!" 

Put JVorker in the Movies 
To Improve His Act 

IxDUSTRiES are finding a n^w use for 
motion pictures. Pictures are taken of 
a job in process and then projected in 
the presence of the workman, who is 
shown where time has been lost, mo- 
tions wasted, and how his own efforts 
compare with more expert operators. 

For years, motion studies by means 
of special apparatus have been utilized 
for technical analysis of work meth- 
ods. Only recently, however, has the 
ordinary movie outfit been put to this 
use. Those who have tried it say that 
the average employee apparently en- 
joys having his picture taken, even if 
it is for the purpose of showing where- 
in his workmanship is not perfect ; 
that his application to the job while 
pictures are being taken is usually 
better than average ; that a better esti- 
mate of his innate ability can be ob- 
tained than by time studies. 

By use of constant speed cameras 
and projectors it is possible to project 
pictures at speeds at which the man 
W'Orks or at any other desired. By 
using various speeds it has been found 
possible to ti'ain time study men in 
proper operation rating, and to check 
the work of new time study men, 
calibrate their judgment, and indicate 
their errors. Motion pictures also pro- 
vide records of working conditions, 
useful in settling disputes regarding 
changes in methods. 

Modern scientific efficiency has de- 
signed many devices for home comfort 
but never one that will open the win- 
dow after vou have gotten into bed. 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY • 19 30 



EASEL FRAMES 

High quality — attractive prices 
In stock, awaiting your orders 




No. 203 
SILVER AND DARK BROWN 

or 

PLATINUM, STIPPLED 
4^x6^, or 7x9% 
$2.70 each (list) 



No. 307 

SILVER AND POLYCHROME 

or 

PLATINUM AND POLYCHROME 

4^x6^, or 7x9->^ 
$3.30 each (list) 




No. 425 

PLATINUM, TONED WITH BLUE 

7x9)^ only 

$5.00 each (list) 



No. 602 

SILVER, STIPPLED AND TONED 

10x13 only 

$7.50 each (list) 



THE FOCrS FOR JTLV 



1930 



[9 



Eastman Professional Printer 



[Model 2 



The model 2 Eastman Professional 
Printer has several distinct improve- 
ments \vhich add to its appearance, its 
efficiency and ease of operation. The 
cabinet is made entirely of fabricated 
steel enameled a rich olive brown. It is 
a handsome and durable piece of equip- 
ment. 

The principle of projecting the light 
from a single lamp, horizontally to a 
mirror, and from this mirror, at right 
angles, vertically to the negative is the 
same as in the previous model. This 
principle could not be improved upon. 
The negative is evenly illuminated and 
the light rays are almost parallel. 

The previous model used a lOOO-watt 
lamp and the intensity of the light was 
controlled by a rheostat. This permitted 
the light to be reduced at will but, 
when reduced, its full intensity could 
not be secured instantly. An improve- 
ment has been made by omitting the 
rheostat and placing three lamp sockets 
on a fan-shaped fixture with an electric 
connection at its base. 

Three lamps may be in this fixture at 
all times and any one of the three may 
be shifted into position in front of the 
reflector in the fraction of a second — 
as easy as shifting the headlights of 
your car from dim to bright. In either 
of two of these sockets a 25-, 250- or 
500-watt, T-20 type, pre-focus base 
lamp may be used. The remaining 
socket has a mogul base for a 1000- 
watt, T-20 type, pre-focus base lamp. 
An ordinary 40-watt, frosted globe pilot 
lamp beneath a sheet of amber glass 
in the base of the printer furnishes am- 
ple light for adjusting negatives and 
masks. 

When the platen of the printer comes 
in contact with the negative the full 
intensity of the light from the lamp is 
secured instantly. The 25-watt lamp 
may be used for extremely fast papers 
\vhile for the slower ones the 500-watt 



lamp will usually give ample printing 
speed. But for slow papers and dense 
negatives the lOOO-watt lamp is avail- 
able in an instant. A 250-watt lamp 
may at any time be substituted for the 
25- or 500-watt lamp. 

Next in importance, we believe, is the 
improvement in the platen of the Model 
2 Printer. Easy to operate and practic- 
ally noiseless its contact surface is made 
nf two heavy pieces of transparent cellu- 
lose acetate, studded ^vith rubber points 
which are firmly held in place. And 
back of the two sections of the platen 
are metal cross members, sufficiently 
close together to insure firm contact of 
the rubber studs with all portions of 
the negative. The heavy cellulose platen 
is attached to its metal frame with 
ample play so there is no donger of 
buckling. There is also an adjustable 
mask holder for holding masks of any 
thickness without bringing too much 
pressure on the platen. 

The opening on the printer top is 
covered with plate glass and another 
sheet of plate glass slides into any one 
of five sets of grooves in the compart- 
ment beneath the top. It is on this glass 
that vignetting or dodging material is 
placed. The effect of the vignette or 
dodging may be seen through the trans- 
parent platen. 

The vignette is diflFused b\ a sheet of 
ground glass in a frame between the 
light and the negative. To vary diffu- 
sion this is raised or lowered by a knob 
operating in a slot in the side of the 
printer. By turning the knob the ground 
glass is moved to a vertical position 
out of the path of the light. 

Every Eastman Professional Printer 
is set up at the factory and given a 
practical test and is again tested in an 
inspecting department, a careful check 
being made to insure absolute contact 
in the prints from test negatives of 
closelv ruled cross-lined screens. 



THE PRICE. WITHOUT LAMPS. IS $200.00 

liiidtjft terms anarKjrd to 
suit your con-vrnirricc 



Order your Model 2 Professional Printer from 

HIRSCH (Sl KAYE 



10] 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY 



1930 



"Fully Equal to Imported 

Metol at 



One of the 

"Physically and 

Chemically 

Perfected Photo 

Chemicals" 

by 

Mallinckrodt 




its Best" 

and at 

Domestic Prices 



In this way is Pictol described by 
one of the government bureaus and by many of the 
leading studios of the country. 

^Note these comments : 



'We made a comparison of Pictol 
and the developer we were using 
and found that both negatives and 
prints developed showed finer gra- 
dation in the lights and shadows." 

'Made seven 8x10 enlargements in 
a tray of 20 ozs. of solution. I did 
not use it for two days and then I 
developed twenty-four 8x10 en- 
largements in the same solution." 

'With the same formula, the same 
negative and the same paper, and 



the same light, we found that Pictol 
required much shorter exposure. Its 
energy was surprising." 

"I am very well pleased with the 
tones and details given with Pictol. 
Furthermore, the sores I have had 
on my hands from Metol poisoning 
are about healed up due to the use 
of 30ur product." 

* Original letters from which these com- 
ments were taken are in our files subject 
to inspection. 



// you are not familiar ivith 

the luorking qualities of Pictol^ ive ivill gladly send you 

a one ounce bottle for te?i cents 



Address the Home Office: 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

2nd & Mallinckrodt Streets, St. Louis, Missouri 
Makers of the finest in Photographic Chemicals since 1S67 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY 



1930 



[11 



Laws TV hick Affect 
the Photographer 
This is the name of a new book, 
written so that you may have in your 
office, the benefit of a trained, legal 
mind, and the court ruh'ngs that affect 
your business. Every photographer 
needs this book. Its contents will help 
and perhaps surprise you. 

The list of chapters follows: 

1. Taxation Laws Involving Stu- 
dios. 

2. Itinerant Photographers and 
When They Must Obey License Or- 
dinances. 

3. Ownership of Negatives. 

4. Copyright Pictures, Illustrations 
and Labels. 

5. The Copyright Law As It Re- 
lates to Photographs. 

6. Liability of Photographers for 
JVIaking Extra Copies of Portraits. 

7. Validity of Contracts Stopping 
Seller from Establishing Competing 
Studio. 

8. Restraining Ex-Employees from 
Divulging Secrets or Entering Busi- 
ness. 

9. Contracts Between Photograph- 
ers and Customers. 

10. Legal Rules for A^Iaking Col- 
lections. 

11. Guaranteeing Satisfaction to 
the Customer. 

12. Liability for Contracts and 
Agreements Made by Employees. 

13. Sales Contracts and Guaran- 
tees Made by Salesmen of Supplies. 

14. Liability for Injuries Sustained 
by Paid Models. 

15. Law of Compensation for In- 
juries Sustained by Employees. 

16. Liability for Articles Left at 
Studio to be Photographed. 

17. Release Blanks for Sitters, 
Models, Etc. 



18. Points to Watch in Insurance 
Policies. 

The book is 6x9 inches, bound in 
fine dark cloth, title stamped on back 
and cover, printed on high-grade an- 
tique stock which is easy to the eye, 
in a good legible type. Price $3.00 a 
copy. 

Order from Hirsch & Kaye. 

Lessons in Window 
Tri?jiming 

This is the name of a helpful little 
book that we will send on request. 
You may get some new ideas for your 
windows from this book, and the few 
minutes required to read the book 
will be well spent. 

Chromium Squeegee Plates 

At last a plate for squeegeeing 
glossy prints that is free from the 
troubles of ferrotype tins! These new 
chromium plates are durable, have a 
wonderfully polished surface and pro- 
duce brilliant prints. This is the same 
plating that is seen on all the late 
high grade motor cars. While they 
cost more than the old ferrotype tins, 
they are cheaper in the long run. 

After removing the prints, simply 
let hot water run over the plates and 
they are ready for use next time. No 
polishing — no trouble. They are not 
damaged by heat and do not blister 
or peel. Start your kodak-finishing 
season right and order some of these. 

Size 18x24 inches, each $3.75, per 
dozen $39.25. 

"I have learned by experience that 
no man's character can be eventually 
injured but by his own acts." 

— Rowland Hill. 



12] 



THE FOCI'S FOR JULY • 1930 




TME OUTLOOK »»» 

A Serviceable 

View Mount 

Specially designed for view and 
commercial work, including en- 
largements from amateur nega- 
'tives — but also a most suitable 
mount for wedding, family and 
other portrait groups. 



Sample for ten cents 
Sample Offer F-106 



Sizes- 



5x7 6^x8 V2 8x10 6x10 7x11 



Prices 

per 100— $6.50 8.50 10.50 10.00 12.50 

Stock is Veinstone grade — stone 
grey color. 



TAPRELL, LOOMIS & COMPANY 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



THE FOCrS FOR J T L V • 19 30 



[13 



er r y s 




By Himself 



Comer 



Another fellow and mc went on a 
vacation together. I think the name 
of the place was Shady Retreat, and 
now I know why its shady. The folder 
said it was a nice place. 

It was a long ride to get there and 
when we arrived I savs to the man, 
wheres the shower baths, and he says 
I dont know, I only been here three 
weeks. 

The first night I knew thev had 



thr 



ee season 



beds 



s — no springs. 



The June bug comes the last of June 
The lightning bug iit IVIay; 

The bed bug takes his bonnet off 
And says: "I'm here to stay." 

About the third night I heard a 
racket in my room and ran down to 
tell the farmer there was two mice 
fighting in my room. He says what 
are you paying for your room? And 
I says, a dollar, and he says, well, 
what do vou want for a dollar, a bull 
fight? 

The first couple of days I was poi- 
soned bv biting insects so I asked a 
man what to do, and he says why 
dont you quit biting them and be a 
vegetearian ? 

We had nothing to do so I went 
to the station to see the train go past. 
One train stopped and a man leaned 



out of the window, gave me four (4) 
bits and said, say, boy, get me a sand- 
wich and get one for yourself. 

While I was gone, the whistle blew 
so I hurried back and says, here mister 
is your quarter. We only got time for 
one sandwich. 

I was interested in all the fruit 
they had. I asked the farmer what he 
did with all of it, and he says. Wall, 
we eat what we can and what we 
can't eat we can. We do the same 
thing, mister, with our papers, says I. 
we sell what we can sell and what 
we can't sell we cancell. 
^^ 

There was some more fellows there, 

so a bunch of us went up the creek 
and went swimming. The water was 
fine, and while we as in, a lady came 
by and says, boys isn't it against the 
law to go swimming without your 
clothes? Sure, we says, but theres no 
cops around here, cummon in. 

We had hung our clothes on a 
tree, you see. When I wasn't looking, 
some smart guy painted the head of 
a jackass on my shirt. That got my 
goat, and I says, which one of you 
guys wiped his face on my shirt? 

Next year, I'll take a Scotch vaca- 
tion. Stay home and let my mind 
wander. j^^^^^. 



14] THEFOCUSFORJULY.1930 

NORWIL PRESS FLASH 

The claim is made that 

At last the perfect "smokeless" flash 

powder is here. Norwil Press Flash 

is the result of years of research and 

experiment. It has no smoke, is fast, and 

makes ver}^ little noise or report. Abso- 

^^__^-^_^_^ lutely clean! No shower of cinders, or 

100 grams (3^ oz.) fh^ng Sparks. Has the highest endoi'se- 

$2.85 ment of leading Press and Commercial 

■=^=:^=^==z photographers. 

Order frojti 

HiRSCH & Kaye 



ANNOUNCING THE NEW 

LEY HOME PORTRAIT TRIPOD 

The prime feature of this tripod is to get a lower camera level 
for photographing children (in natural every day life) on the 
fioor and yet with its main staff made of Shelby seamless steel 
telescope tubing in three sections, the camera can be elevated 
from 24 to 60 inches high for all around home portrait work. 

The legs have 12-inch telescope inserts for uneven fioor or 
ground, the ends of which are tipped with maple wood knobs, 
so as not to injure delicate floors. 

The tripod is constructed throughout for strength where 
strength is needed and light weight where permissible. 

Another outstanding feature of this tripod is a square steel 
strip electrically spot welded to the main staff, so the thumb 
screws in crow feet slides will not injure the outside tubing. All 
clamps and bands are built extra heavy to give long wear and 
service and yet the tripod only weighs lyi lbs. complete including 
tilting top. 

The tilting top is of 5-ply walnut veneer with a beautiful hand 
rubbed duco finish, which permits a camera elevation from to 90 
degrees ; has extra strong slotted slides and extra long threaded 
Bessemer steel bar bolt with reinforced head that will never break 
or come off. Size 7"x9". The tripod folds up very compact to 
only 23^ inches long. 

The finish is oxidized copper and nickel plate on the tubing 
that telescopes, making a very neat appearance. 

Some operators prefer a still shorter stand in which case the bottom of 
main staff is cut off so top will be only 19J^ inches from floor. However, 24 
inches seems to be accepted as standard. 

Many compliments have already been accorded operators on their fine 
equipment when using this tripod. 

Last, but not least, after this tripod has seen hard service or should any 
part become damaged by accident, it is the easiest tripod on the market to 
replace parts and refinish, ta look like new, at a small cost. Every tripod is 
guaranteed one year against defective material or workmanship. 

Price $22.00. 

SOLD BY 

HiRSCH & Kaye 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY 



1930 



[15 



Things Yom Should Kho^h^ 



ABOUT COLORS 



"I was tickled pink," 
"I was so mad I saw 
red," "I felt blue," "I 
was green with jeal- 
ousy," "Oh, he's yel- 
low." . . . Ever stop to 
think just why certain 
colors express sensa- 
tions that have been ex- 
perienced? Why say "I 
felt blue," instead of "I 
felt pink, or green"? 
They sound right, and yet one may 
ask, "Why?" IVIany would like to 
know. 

Different colors have had different 
effect, whether realized or not, until 
finally one associates those colors with 
the various effects that they have pro- 
duced. So that when certain sensations 
are experienced from an entirely dif- 
ferent cause they become associated 
with a color. For instance, red is an 
exciting color, loud and passionate ; 
it causes excitement, the eyes sparkle, 
the pulses race, and provoke thoughts 
of war, flame, and glorious victory, 
of blood, roar of cannon, and deafen- 
ing shouts; of hate, love, and lust. 
Is it any wonder then that when one 
becomes angry, the pulses beat more 
rapidly, and the eyes sparkle with the 
glint of steel, that one is conscious of 
the color red ; and that when one be- 
comes pleased immensely, and feels a 
glow and a stimulation, a milder form 
of red, to express the mood, should 
be used, as, one is tickled pink? 

It all seems consistent, doesn't it? 
Now, here's something else to think 




about: The similarity 
between the spectrum 
(the gamut of colors) 
and the chromatic scale 
(the gamut of music). 
That may sound rash, 
but listen ! When a ray 
of sunlight, or a beam 
of light traverses a 
prism at a certain angle 
and a white screen is 
placed in the proper 
position, a series of colors are reflected 
thereon. These colors range from a 
deep red to a violet, and in between 
are orange, yellow, green, and blue. 
Together these colors compose the 
spectrum bank. Now' take the chro- 
matic scale. This is composed of 
twelve notes — C, C sharp, D, D sharp, 
E, F, F sharp, G, G sharp. A, A sharp 
and B. To correspond with these 
notes are the colors — red, red-orange, 
orange, orange-yellow, yellow, yellow- 
green, green, green-blue, blue, blue- 
violet, violet, and violet-red. 

There are other points of similarity. 
The spectrum contains all possible 
gradations of simple colors, and the 
chromatic scale, a simple gradation of 
notes, varying in pitch. The colors in 
the spectrum are arranged in the 
order most pleasing to the eye, and the 
notes in the scale in a manner most 
pleasing to the ear. The speed of vi- 
bration of the ether at the violet end 
of the spectrum has double the num- 
ber of vibrations of the first color. 
Light is a vibration of the ether as 

[ Continued on pagf 21 ] 



16] 



THE FOCUS FOR T IL V 



1930 




Our Salesmen Tell Us 



The Warren Photo Service at 
San Diego has been purchased by 
the Thompson Photo Service. The 
combined establishments will be con- 
ducted as an enlarged Thompson 
Photo Service. 

Frank Flannery, for several 
years a Berkeley photographer, re- 
cently purchased the Todd Studio in 
Oroville. The studio was remodeled 
and refinished and was formally re- 
opened on June 21. The reopening 
was very well handled by a reception 
and suitable announcements and invi- 
tations were issued. This form of 
opening gives the new owner a great 
deal of prestige with his newly found 
neighbors. 

Here is a vacation hint that some 
of you may be able to use. J. F. Zink, 
formerly located in Chico, and now in 
Marysville, paid the rent on his stu- 
dio for four months in advance. Early 
in June he closed the studio for these 
four months and announced that his 
studio would not be reopened until 
October 1. 

J. B. Hughes has purchased the 
Blue Lantern Studio at Fullerton, 
California. Mr. Hughes was formerly 
located at Santa Cruz, where he spe- 
cialized on home portrait work. 



Everybody in California interested 
in photography knows Walter 
Seely, prominent portrait artist, with 
studios at Beverly Hills and San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Seely is a busy and tireless 
man, directing these two widely sepa- 
rated studios, but still finds time to 
keep abreast of all new developments 
in his profession. 

E. M. (Bill) Hammond of Por- 
terville, is passing up the High Sier- 
ras this summer for a visit to his home 
state — Kansas. 

Carl J. Wallace, Identification 
Expert of the Sheriff's Office, Ven- 
tura, dropped in to see us recently 
while in the northern part of the 
state, on a combined business and 
pleasure trip. We congratulate Mr. 
Wallace on his recent election as 
Vice President of the California State 
Division of Identification, which re- 
cently held their 15th Annual Con- 
vention in Santa Monica. 

Daniel DuPertuis of ^Vlerced 
has been appointed rural supervisor of 
music for the schools of Merced 
County. Mrs. DuPertuis reports that 
studio business, contrary to the gen- 
eral outlook, has been the best in 
vears. 



THE FOCUS FOR ] VL Y 



1930 



[17 



Thomas Shoor sold his dairy 
ranch in the vicinity of Turlock, and 
is now exclusively engaged in the 
management of his Turlock and Mo- 
desto studios. 

Lew Hegg, staff jhotographer of 
the Fi'esno Bee, was married to Miss 
Vera Patterson in Reno on June 9. 
The young couple are now motoring 
in the northern part of the state, and 
will shortlv return to P'resno to make 
their home. A toast should be in order. 
"Long life on the boulevard of hap- 
piness." 

A. Rick, Santa Rarbara, has moved 
his photo finishing department to en- 
larged quarters, and has installed a 
Pako Double Duty Dryer, border 
printers and other items of up-to-the- 
minute equipment. When completed, 
we venture that his plant will com- 
pare in modern fitness to the best in 
the west. His portrait studio will be 
maintained at the same location as 
heretofore under the capable manage- 
ment of Mr. P. H. Green. Miss Betty 
Rick, smiling and vivacious, will have 
charge of the Kodak Department "up 
front." 

Among those who are fortunate 
enough to enjoy a vacation, we should 
mention Miss ^Laude Stixson of 
Berkeley. 

Verxox Powell, son of L. \l. 
Powell, Hanford photographer, grad- 
uated from high school during the 
past month, and is shortly to take 
the entrance examinations for West 
Point. Tremendously interested in 
aviation, he plans to major in aero- 
nautics. 



Aggressive and prosperous as ever 
is A. J. Austin of Ventura. This is 
indicated by his new $15,000 home on 
Vista Del Mar, fringing the sea at the 
Palisades. Commanding an unrivaled 
view of the surf and the sea, it con- 
stitutes a scene that artists paint on 
canvas and writers tell about in po- 
etry. The furnishings of the home and 
the gardens which constitute his little 
estate are worthy of a description be- 
yond our ability to get over on paper. 
Tourists are observed many times each 
day, snapshoting it from all angles 
with their cameras. 

Mr. Austin covers the distance to 
his studio in a very few minutes in 
his La Salle sport sedan. It is of in- 
terest to note that Mr. Austin has 
made his money in photo finishing, 
disproving it would seem, that the 
grasses are greener in other pastures. 

The fire that destroyed the hotel 
at Blairsden, California, on July 1, 
spread to the studio and residence of 
A. J. Warren. The building was 
destroyed with practically no warn- 
ing, and Mr. Warren and his family 
lost most of their clothing and prac- 
tically all of his photographic equip- 
ment. 

We were much interested in the 
expressions of sympathy which were 
made in a most practical manner. The 
Penman Peak Lumber Company near 
by donated 6,000 feet of lumber for 
reconstruction and eight carpenters, 
employed to rebuild the railroad sta- 
tion, volunteered their services to do 
the work. A San Jose contractor, Mr. 
Logan Kay, furnished considerable 
hardware, and when Mr. Warren re- 
turned from San Francisco with 
emergency equipment, he foimd his 
new studio awaiting him. 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY • 1930 



For Perfect Pictures 



( Call it /G\ Gan-\)ert) 



The Three High Class 

GEVAERT 

PORTRAIT PAPERS 

Gevaert Warm Tone Portrait Paper 

The portrait contact of the hour. 
A revelation of luxurious tones and delicate gra- 
dations. 

Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

A chlorobrom emulsion carefully balanced to pro- 
duce portraits of contact quality. 

Gevaert Portrait Bromide Paper 

A fast enlarging paper for use where speed and 
quality are of equal importance. 

The Gevaert Portrait Papers are supplied in a 
variety of beautiful surfaces. Identical surfaces may 
be obtained in any of the three high class Gevaert 
Portrait Papers. Gevaert paper stock is known for 
its finest quality. 



Descripti've Calalog on Request 

The Gevaert Company of America, Inc. 

423-439 West 5Sth St., New York, N. Y. 

413-421 N. State St. 345-349 Adelaide St., W. 

Chicaso, 111. 'l^oronto, C';m. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH SC KAYE, 
San Francisco 



TH E FOCI' S FOR I I'L V 



1930 



[19 



Professaoiial Service 



"T 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTKR 

Photographic Prints Executed 

in Oil, Water Color, Black and 

White, Sepia, etc. Also Ivory 

Miniatures. 

50 GOLDEX GATE AVEXUE 

San Francisco 

Room 420 Phone PRospt-ct 0476 



RETOUCHING 
ETCHING 

Carefully Handled 
Good Service 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Ave. 



Oakland, Calif. 



RETOUCHING 

By expert of years 
of experience 



MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 
Prompt Service. Prices Reasonable 

Matilda S. Ransdell 

3100 Fulton Street 
B.'\vvie\v 4584 Sai\ Francisco 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Quality and Service. 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 

and Photo Coloring. Opal 

Miniatures 



MAUD B. COREY 



QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

Save Time, Worry and Money 
by having your Quantity 
Printing done by a firm that 
specializes in Quantity Produc- 
tion. All sizes up to 11x14. 
Minimum 100 from Negative. 
Quick Service.' Work Guar- 
anteed. 

J. K. PIGGOTTCO. 

86 Third Street San Francisco 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to 
the Trade 



ALTA STUDIOS, Inc. 

Phone MArket 9581 
1271 Mission Street San Francisco 




2916 Steiner Street 



PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures — 
artistically done in real oils or 
tints — from one to (}uantities. 

RETOUCHING 

Choose from our staff of com- 
petent retouchers the ones you 
like best to do your retouching. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

EVER READY SERVICE 



San Francisco, Calif. Phone CJRavstone 7912 



128 5 Geary Street 



20] 



THE FOCI'S FOR Jl'LY 



1930 



I ^ AT LA.Sr! ^ Pirfecl Mailer 

i WE SELL 

I 'JheNeivIngenta 

j Photo Mailer 




•Ti/s Mailer has the only 
EXCLUSIVE DOUBLE SEAL FEATURE 



MADE IN THE FOLLOWING 
POPULAR SIZES 

No. 2.... 5%x 7% 

No. 3 6% X 814 

No. 4 7%x 9% 

*No. 5- 8% X 10% 

*No. 6...... 10%xl2% 

*No. 7 1214x141/2 

*No. 8.. 10% X 15 

No. 9.... 614X 914 

*No. 10 71/2x11% 

*No. 11 81/2 X 111/2 

*No. 12 13 X 171/2 

No. 14 16 _ _x 20% 

Packed in cartons containing 50 



The New INGENTO Photo Mailer 

Has the only double seal feature of string fastener 
and gummed flap, making it possible to mail photos 
to foreign countries or send them by first-class mail 
when privacy or additional safety is desired. 

The INGENTO is easily superior to any otiier photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking pho- 
tographs, drawings, sketches or any other valuable matter 
when this mailer is used, as they are perfectly preserved by 
the double corrugated board which covers the photograph or 
drawing both front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. The vari- 
ous sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popular 
up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios throughout 
the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now made 
8% X 11% inches. It will accommodate photographs 8x10 
or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with super- 
strength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large prints, 
folders, enlargements and drawings. 

Manufactured by 

BURKE & JAMES, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH & KAYE 

SIZES for any need PRICES none can meet! 

Prompt Shipments 



Gevaert Portrait Projection Paper 

In keeping with the ti-end of the times, the Gevaert 
Co. has created a new and improved portrait paper 
for projection printing and enlarging. 

This unique paper is known as 
Gevaert Portrait 
Projection Paper 
and is supplied in a variety of specially selected 
surfaces. 

The well known supremacy of Gevaert in the 
. field of enlarging emulsions is a guarantee as to the 
excellence of the quality of Gevaert Portrait 
Projection Paper. 

Rich emulsion — ample speed, yet slow enough 
to permit of dodging properly. Unusual latitude 
— warm black tone. 

The Projection paper that produces contact 
quality prints. 

For perfect pictures use Gevaert Portrait 
Projection Paper. 

Dcscript'i've leaflet sent on request 
H I R S C H ^ K A ^' E 

Have the paper in stock 



THE FOCUS FOR T I' L V 



1930 



[21 



About Colors 

[ Continued from page 1 5 ] 

sound is a vibration of the air. Even 
solid objects are susceptible to certain 
vibrations. This, according to an old 
story, was first discovered centuries 
ago by a violinist. He told the incred- 
ulous people that he could fiddle down 
a certain sturdy bridge. He, of course, 
was laughed at, but, undaunted, he 
began to play his violin faster, faster, 
faster, and still faster until the bridge 
finally began to tremble, and then to 
crumble into bits. 

The fiddler had found the rate of 
vibration of that bridge. So are sound 
and color the result of different rates 
of vibration. 

There are various points of simi- 
larity between the colors of the spec- 
trum and the notes of the chromatic 
scale. Here is yet another one. Just as 
different notes and combinations of 
notes produce different effects, just so 
do different colors and combinations 
of colors produce different effects, (^f 
course, the psychological powers of 
colors are proportional to the purity 
of colors. If a color is weakened with 
white or subdued with black, it is not 
so powerful in emotional value. Red 
is the most powerful of all colors, 
arousing (or stimulating) desire, am- 
bition, action, ecstasy, and is to be 
used with discretion. It reaches its 
fullest power when a scarlet-red. So 
don't go flaunting that color before 
any bull. 

Orange, too, is stimulating, but to 
a lesser degree than red, and has a 
cheering effect, perhaps through its 
association with sunlight. However, if 
not in the mood for warmth or stimu- 
lation, orange can be irritating be- 
cause of that very association. For 
example if one is having a nice, cheer- 
ful siege of the "blues" and it's rain- 



ing dismally out of doors, and the 
roof is leaking, and one has a miser- 
able cold, and can't taste the favorite 
dish of spare-ribs and sauerkraut — 
and then someone enters in a bright 

orange dress ! Well, judge the 

effect it would have ! Yellow is the 
last of the trilogy of warm colors, but 
seems to have less personality than 
either of the other two, if a color can 
be said to have personality. It, too, is 
cheerful and stimulating, but if it 
tends to merge even a little with 
its spectrum neighbor, green, and be- 
comes a greenish-yellow, it may be 
sickening, or arouse jealousy, or sick- 
ness. Of the three remaining colors — 
green, blue, violet — green has the 
least effect, emotionally speaking. It is 
neither a sad nor a cheerful color, but 
on the whole, one that inspires cheer- 
fulness. Blue is cooling and subduing; 
while violet is somewhat gloomy and 
depressing. It has been said that "Both 
in color and in sound, the emotional 
effect is dependent to a large degree 
upon proportion and contrast, coupled 
with harmony and dissonance," and 
this is perfectly true. Placing together 
the two colors nearly alike produces 
an unpleasant effect, as striking two 
adjacent notes on a piano produces a 
discord. D and E sounded together 
are discordant, as are orange and yel- 
low when in contrast. C and G har- 
monize ; so do red and blue. How- 
ever, when two colors, or notes, are 
discordant, it is possible by the appli- 
cation of another note or color to 
make them harmonize. For instance, 
red and orange together have an 
unpleasant effect, but with the addi- 
tion of black, the whole combination 
is pleasing. It is the same way in 
music. C and B are discordant, but 
with E the whole is harmonious. As 

[ C'oMtiniucl on page 23 J 



22} THEFOCUSFOR JULY. 1930 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

(mercury vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc 
lamps. Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 
Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small 
amount of current. Supplied for permanent or portable in- 
stallation. Write for catalogues. For sale by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



P. I. P. A. CONVENTION 

(Pacific International Photographers' Association) 

OLYMPIC HOTEL, SEATTLE, WASH. 
AUGUST 21-22-23, 1930 



Reserve these days and be there. For information, membership, etc., write to 
C. F. RICHARDSON, Sec'ty, P.O. Box 52, Mihvaukie, Oregon. 




Forging Ahead 



For almost half a century Hammer-made emulsions 
have found and are still finding a ready market 
because — 

It's so easy to select a special brand for any picture 
you are called on to make, — it's so easy to make 
better photographs than the ones you thought were 
best. 

^^ Photo fjraphs tell the story '^ 

JVrilc for frrr portfolio of prints 



HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 

159 West 22nd St., Ohio Ave. .^- Miami St., 

New York City St. Louis 



THE FOCUS FOR JUL^' 



1930 



[23 



About Colors 

[ Contiiuu'd from page 21 J 

in music, too, are the major and minor 
effects of color. 

Purple and black, either separately 
or combined, have a distinctly de- 
pressing minor tone, while yellow and 
green strike a major chord in color 
harmony, and form a pleasing com- 
bination. Yellow enlivens the neutral- 
ity of green, and green in its turn 
tones down the stimulus of yellow. 
When two colors do not harmonize, 
it is usually advantageous to separate 
them with white, although when both 
colors are brilliant, like red and 
orange, black is often preferable. 
However, when two colors, one bril- 
liant and the other sombre, are com- 
bined, gray proves more successful 
than either black or white. Because 
of their emotional reactions, both 
color and music have played a part 
in the curing of disease. The mental 
side of color and music works on the 
physical side of the individual through 
suggestion. Probably the first use of 
music in the treatment of disease oc- 
curred when David took his harp and 
played before Saul. The use of color 
cannot boast of so early an origin, but 
it has been, nevertheless, very impor- 
tant in the prevention, as well as in 
the cure of disease. 

In one sanitairum rooms are fur- 
nished entirely in solid colors — each 
room to be used for a different ail- 
ment. Rooms in which the color was 
red were found helpful when the 
patient was afflicted with melancholia 
or depression. 

The brilliant color was found to 
cheer them to an astonishing degree. 
Violent patients were soon quieted 
when put in a blue room. Green 
proved to be valuable because it was 
quieting and induced repose. Black 



helped to put insomnia sufferers to 
sleep. 

This article on color will be contin- 
ued in the August and September 
issues. Save your copies for future ref- 
erence. 

^ .^ 

The Front Pdtje 

A miner of the gold rush period 
who hasn't yet stopped his quest for 
gold in Sierra stream beds is Hippilitc 
G. Tramblay, 94, of Challenge, Calif. 

With rakes, shovels and long toms 
of his own manufacture, he still works 
the gravel beds after the rains. He 
came to California in the early '50's 
and has devoted most of his adult life 
to mining. 

He was a colorful figure in the 
Trails of '49 celebration in Marys- 
ville, Feb. 8. Newsreel photographers 
were so impressed with him they took 
Tramblay to Parks Bar, site of an 
early day mining town on the Yuba 
river, and where he panned for gold 
while the cameras clicked. 

To add variety to a life of adven- 
ture, Tramblam engaged in several 
campaigns against Indians and he 
asserts, he married an even dozen 
Indian maidens at various times when 
he and California were young. 

Here's an interesting experiment : 
Ask the next ten people who come 
into your store, "Is your camera 
loaded?" You'll be surprised at the 
number who'll say, "No" . . .and even 
more surprised at the number who 
will be glad to overcome the defi- 
ciency then and there, by buying Ko- 
dak Film. 

There's one good thing about a 
milk shake. You needn't drink three 
more to prove you aren't a tightwad. 




Courtesy of Universal Pictures Corporation 



Brilliance wltk Softness 



The deep rich quality of an Agfa 
Portrait Film negative is beautiful in 
itself, but the wonderful prints it 
makes are the photographer's real re- 
ward. Delicacy with brilliance — 
softness without flatness, and crisp- 
ness without that harsh chalky look 
• — true emulsion flexibility and lat- 




itude, make Agfa Portrait Film more 
and more preferred. 

You can obtain Agfa Portrait Film 
very easily — not only froni Bingham- 
ton and independent stockhouses, but 
also from Agfa Ansco branches in 
Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Kansas City, Detroit, Atlanta, Wash- 
inston, and Boston. 



AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON 



THE FOCr S FOR J (TLV 



1930 



[25 



Rapid Paper Holder 

Rapid En/aty/L'tJients 

Enlargements can be made as fast 
as your enlarger will print them. 
With the Rapid Paper Holder there 
is practically no time lost between 
exposures. Generally from one-half to 
three-fourths of the time used for 
making enlargements is wasted in 
placing and handling the paper. An 
accurate and speedy paper holder is 
an absolute necessity. Four hours 
should not be spent on a job that 
could have been finished in one. 

Operation 

Several dozen sheets of paper are 
inserted in the open side of the holder, 
all with the emulsion side up. The 
paper is pressed upward by a metal 
plate and springs against the frame 
which forms the size of the picture 
and leaves a quarter inch white 
margin. 

The frame, which forms the mask 
for the picture, is hinged on the side 
so that ly^ inches of the front edge 
can be raised up to make easy the 
insertion and withdrawal of the paper. 
When one exposure is made, the top 
sheet of paper is withdrawn and the 
next sheet is in place ready for the 
next exposure. 

Tinted Borders and 
White Margins 

Printed borders can be made by 
using a regular border tinting mask 
and using the stops on two edges of 
the holder frame as guides and then 
printing the border with a separate 
light placed near the lens of the 
camera. 

For plain white margins of irregu- 
lar shape, or for borders wider than 



one-fourth inch, a mask is cut of card- 
board the size and shape of the pic- 
ture desired and is clamped on the top 
of the paper holder with the two 
thumb screws on the back of the 
frame. 

Auto Focus Enlargers 

The Rapid Paper Holder can be 
used Mn'th any Auto Focus Enlarger 
without changing the adjustment in 
any way. The plane of the paper is 
one inch above the base, which places 
it in the correct focus for automatic 
enlargers. 

The Rapid Paper Holder is made 
in three sizes for: 

5x7 Paper $ 7.00 

8x10 Paper 7.50 

11x14 Paper 10.00 

Contact or Projection 
Prints? 

Many of the largest and best stu- 
dios make practically all of their 
prints by projection, because they are 
able to get a quality which is impos- 
sible by contact printing. With an 
Elwood Enlarger and this new Paper 
Holder your enlargements can be 
made as rapidly, or even more rap- 
idly than contact prints. 

Any of the several models of El- 
wood Enlargers, and others, may be 
obtained from Hirsch & Kaye. Order 
your enlarger and Rapid Paper 
Holder. Terms, if desired. 

Kodak Film has the inbuilt quality 
that provides more good prints per 
roll from customers' negatives . . . 
and Kodak Film advertising creates 
the demand that provides more good 
rolls to print. Kodak Film, therefore, 
is the film your customers want — the 
film it's easy to sell them. 



26 ] 



THE F O C r S FOR J T L V 



1930 



Rubber Plated Steam 
Shovels 

Thanks to a new process of electro- 
deposition of rubber upon iron, steel, 
and other metals, it is now possible to 
make abrasion resisting material of 
unusual lasting quality. Of the several 
methods by which rubber and metal 
can be united, the electro-deposition 
process, successfully developed by the 
Eastman Kodak Co., is probably the 
most satisfactory. The process, and its 
possibilities in manufacturing and in- 
dustry, are being exploited by a large 
rubber company. 



Several installations of rubber-lined 
chutes for abrasive materials have 
been in service for some time. The 
oldest, about two and one-half 3ears, 
has been handling 1,000 tons of sand 
and gravel daily. In the first two years 
of this service the rubber liners wore 
not more than 1/16 in. 

The shell of a large ball-grinding 
mill in a cement plant was lined with 
flat sheets of rubber 1 inch thick. 
After 14 months' continuous service 
the lining was found to have worn not 
more than 1/64 inch at any point de- 
spite the mill's load of 45,000 pounds 
of steel balls. 



Charcoal Black 

An unusual paper for Projection Printing. Designed 
for those who wish their prints to command atten- 
tion and produce new business. Grade "A" thin 
parchment — Grade "B" medium weight parchment. 
Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, 3.25. 

Order from HiRSCH & KAYE 



Universal Opaque 

A bright red opaque that will 
not crack, nor become sticky. It 
will spread evenly and a single 
application of the brush will 
cover — can also be applied with 
a pen. Each lot is tested for these 
qualities before shipped to us. 



1 oz. jars $ .25 

4 oz. cans 60 

8 oz. cans 1.00 



Order today and he rom'iricrd 



HiRScii & Kave 



Velour Black Canvas 

in dozen packages 

Since our first announcement of 
Velour Black Canvas, this new 
material has made a place for 
itself. Originally announced in 
rolls 44 inches wide, in lengths 
of 5 feet (or multiples of 5), we 
now^ announce Velour Black 
Canvas in cut sheets. 



SxlO per doz $ 3.60 

11x14 per doz 7.20 

16x20 per doz 14.40 

Other sizes in proportion. 



Order today from 

HiRSCH & Ka^T. 



THE FOCUS FOR JULY 



1930 



[ 27 



New Eastman Paper 

Eastman Translite Paper is a 
dupli-tized or duo-coated paper that 
should be of special interest to com- 
ercial photographers who are making 
transparent window display material 
for advertising agencies. 

The semi Matte side of Eastman 
Translite Paper is coated with an 
emulsion having speed and contrast 
similar to No. 2 contrast paper and 
the matte side with a fast emulsion 
that permits printing through the 
stock. The reverse image on the back 
prints to sufficient density to make the 
print appear stereoscopic when view- 
ing it as a transparency. 

This paper can be colored with 
transparent oils on the reverse side 
thus showing the same print in mono- 
chrome and color. Aside from its 
quality the difference in the price of 
this product and negative material 
should be a good talking point when 
attempting to interest advertising 
agencies in transparent window dis- 
play photographs. Prices same as for 
Vitava Projection, double weight. 

Address Correspondence 
to the Firm 
At the risk of becoming tiresome we 
wish again to emphasize the advis- 
ability of addressing your letters to 
the firm rather than to some particu- 
lar individual. In the absence of the 
particular person, the letter might not 
be opened, thus defeating the very 
purpose the writer may have had in 
so addressing it — that is, some special 
attention. Address the firm and on the 
inside call attention to the person you 
wish to handle the letter. 



The Glycerin Bath 
For Prints 

Whex all of the moisture is taken 
out of a print in drying, it becomes 
more or less brittle and has a tendency 
to curl. For this reason, some photo 
finishers run all their glossy prints 
through a glycerin solution before 
placing them on ferrotype plates or on 
the rack to dry. 

The proportions are one ounce of 
glycerin to each ten ounces of water 
and the water should be at a tempera- 
ture of about 80° F. to mix readily 
with the glycerin. Prints are taken 
from the final wash water and placed 
in this solution for several minutes, 
then drained and placed on the ferro- 
type plates. 

As the glycerin does not dry out 
with the water, prints so treated are 
more flexible and much less brittle 
than when they are allowed to be- 
come bone dry. 

It is very important, however, that 
prints which are treated with the gly- 
cerin solution be thoroughly washed, 
as any chemicals remaining in a print 
will cause it to deteriorate much more 
rapidly when moist than when dry. 
— Photo-Finisher. 

Here's a true Scotch story, at least it 
is vouched for by Kodak, Ltd., the 
British house of the Eastman Kodak 
Company. In an inadvertent moment, 
in announcing some new film adver- 
tising folders in their Kodak Trade 
Circular, they advised that the circu- 
lars would be supplied free in quan- 
tities of less than 500, whereupon one 
enterprising gentleman of Aberdeen 
ordered 499. (Abel's.) 

Some people play golf and others 
can talk about many things. 



28 ] 



THE FOCUS FOR J F L V 



19 30 




A 

Better 
J Adhesive 



The new waterless paste for the studio, office, home, 
school and factory. It sticks better — quicker — 
stronger. Always clean and ready for use, and is 
more economical. It is packed in unbreakable alum- 
inum cans with brush inclosed. 

Grip-fix is a clean, white Adhesive, Grip-fix sticks with equal success 

packed in attractive aluminum cans all kinds of paper, also cloth, 

of various sizes with a brush in- leather, glass, etc., and therefore, has 

closed. many uses in the Home and Factory. 

Grip-fix requires no water to keep It is specially recommended for del- 
it moist. It is always ready for use, 'cate work where the usual adhesive 
and can, if desired be brought to a moisture is harmful, 
more semi-liquid consistency by Grip-fix is ideal for children's 
brushing the surface of the paste use. It is so clean and cannot spill, 
briskly. The container cannot break. 

Grip-fix is very economical — only Grip-fix sticks immediately with 

the thinnest film is necessary to ob- a good, strong, and permanent joint, 

tain perfect_ adhesion The thinner ^^^^ p^^^^^^^ ^.^^^ ^^.^. 

you spread it, the tighter it sticks. Each 

Grip-fix is an excellent Photo- 6-oz. Aluminum can with brush en- 

1 • -Kit .... ...• „ • t closed, packed as above 5> .73 

graphic Mountant— mounting prints ^ ^^ ^J^^ ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^„^ 

up to Postal Card thickness without above can almost 3 times 1.15 

dampening. 4-oz. Aluminum can with brush 50 

Grip-fix has less tendency to curl ii-°^- Aluminum can with brush 1.15 

photographs or mountants than most Atsv, in caus and drums 

adhesives. for lommcrcial use: 

Grip-fix will not lump, harden, l^'.b. $1.15 each 

dry or go sour, under conditions of 5 j^^ ....""""""!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!""" 3'25 each 

ordinary use. 11 lb 6.50 each 

Grip-fix will not wrinkle, warp, 2S-lb. Drum— $15.00 each 

stain or discolor paper. Larger Drums — Prices on Re(|uest. 



Order today from HiR.SCH ^ Kave 



THE FOCUS FOR J V I. V 



1930 



[ 29 



[aims 



er 



19E Parralax Reflector 
With lamp and cord. This makes a pow- 
erful lightinjj; unit \vheii placed behind a 
camera for enlarging. Bargain price $27.50 



5x7 Film Pack Adapter 
Bargain price . 



$1.85 



Duplex Jr. Twin- Arc Lamp 
A powerful twin arc that operates in two 
stages of intensity on ordinary wiring cir- 
cuit. Portable and readily carried about. 
Bargain price $42.50 

Beattie Marguerite Spotlight 
Complete with vignettes to produce shadow 
designs on background. Excellent condi- 
tion. Bargain price .... $100.00 
(Terms, if wanted) 

Halldorson Studio Cabinet 
With 4 1500-watt Photo Blue Mazda 
lamps. An excellent lighting unit for indi- 
vidual figures or groups. Each lamp on 
its own switch. Bargain price . $80.00 
(Terms, if wanted) 

Eastman Studio Reflector 
Increases the strength of your light, im- 
proves your modeling. Bargain price $18.50 

12-IN-. Emerson Fan (A.C.) 

\^'ith hot breeze heating coil attachment. 

Bargain price $19.50 

8x12x42 Blue Sterling Tank 

Popular with finishers. 17-gallon capacity. 

Bargain price $12.00 



8x10 Ansco Printer 
Like new. Bargain price 



$32.50 



Eastman Floodlight 

With 500-watt lamp. Bargain price, $13.75 

Callier Auto-Focus Enlarger 

A popular and satisfactory enlarger fitted 

with F4.5 W o 1 1 e n s a k Lens. Bargain 

price $85.00 

(Terms, if wanted) 



30-iN. Halldorson Print Washer 
(Horizontal.) So designed that it is im- 
possible for prints to bunch in center. 
Bargain price $16.50 

Spotlight 

With 250-watt Mazda lamp and heavy 

solid base. Bargain price . . $12.00 

15-iN. Eastman Metal Trimmer 
Bargain price $7.00 

5x7 Eastman View Camera 

In excellent condition. Case shows signs of 

use. Bargain price .... $48.00 

Trays 

7x9 Elect rose (black composition). 

Each $ .63 

Tra-^s 

7x9 Clenuine Porcelain. Each . . $1.15 

Fixing Boxes 

5x7 Glass. Each $2.25 

RuBV Glass 

8x10. Each $ .23 

V'isiBLE Graduates 

1-oz. Most useful in dark room. Marked in 

black. Each $ .18 

Measuring (Classes 

24-oz. Each $ .27 

Fixing Boxes 

4x5, Glass. Each $1.65 

Print Frames 

4x5 Heavy, piano-hinged. Each . $ .47 

Wood Negative Racks 

With capacitv of 25 plates up to 65/^x8 ^.. 

Each $ .13 

Clergy Flash C}uns 

Last year's models, but new. Ignited by 

primer. Each $15.00 

5x7 Ansco Prinier 

Baragin price $7.75 



HiRSCH & Kave 

SAN FRANCISCO 



30 } 



THE F O C r S FOR J I' L Y • 1930 



ARTURA IRIS 

A Paper of Character 



I 



SURFACES 

Semi-Matt 

Matt 

Buff Medium Rough Ma'.t 

Buff Ma'.t 

Plat Matt 

Buff Plat Matt 

*J'ellex 

Plat Luster 

Buff Plat Luster 

Maroquin 
Buff Maroguin 
IVhite Rough- 
Medium PF eight 

MonOkroM 

(Rough Luster) 

Rose — Oli-ve — Green — Blue 

MonOkroM 

(Silk) 

Rose and Green 

*Singlc IVcight 



NTERPRETS skillful 
portraiture faithfully, faultlessly 
and without complication. 

Produced in a choice selection of 
artistic surfaces whose varied 
beauties respond to the exacting 
demands of photographic por- 
trait-makino-. 



DEFENDER 
of Rochester 



Defender Photo Supply Company, inc. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



Prints with a Sellin 
Argument 

How often one hears the remark, """"It's ex- 
pensive to pack and mail photographs," 
But you have a real selling argument when 
you show Ad-Type prints to a business man 
and explain their advantages. They stand 
rough handling — fold without cracking — 
do not curl. They can be mailed with a 
letter or circular without packing. In short, 
there are a thousand uses for Ad-Type and 
you only have to explain its advantages to 
materially increase your sales, create new 
business and greater volume. 

Ad-Type is a smooth, natural surface 
paper with slight lustre. It is furnished in 
six degrees of contrast: Nos. o, i, 2, 3, 4 
and 5, making it possible to secure brilliant 
commercial prints from any type of neg- 
ative. Standard sizes at single weight Azo 
prices, at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 





• 




/ ^ 




/ /(VOvn ^ff;.,'^.'"' ^^1 
/ EAST.MA\'"' ^H 

/ / /hrtrait j H 
/ / /^'^^^ 1 ■ 

1 ) For Home Ponrahuri 1 I^^H 
/ And OenK-ral Work ^^^H 
/ 1 fnThr Studio i^^B 

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1 

1., 

i 


TEN 
ONE DOZE-N PACKAGES 

8x 10 in. 

ELXSTM.VX 

Portrait 
films 

To, Horn. P - ....Mrs 
\n 1 . . 


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The thousands of professional photographers 
who use Eastman Portrait Film use it because 
of its quality — because they can make better 
negatives, can have more freedom, and exercise 
more initiative in devising new lightings and can 
handle and process film with greater ease and 
convenience. But it's the actual quality of re- 
sults that accounts for the ever increasing num- 
ber of Eastman Film users. 

The majority of portrait photographers use 
Eastman Portrait Film, Pa?- Speed, Super Speed 
and Panchromatic. 

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



T« FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



JANUARY. 1930 



x\0. 1 



^^UlFO/^y^ y^ 




// composition by Charles Henry Broivne, of Santa 
Barbara. Realtie's Odeta used for the general illu- 
mination, zvit/i a Hi-Lite placed close to the plain 
monks-cloth (/round for background shadows 



Published by HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



A new contact 

and enlarging 

paper of rich 

iparmth and 

beauty 






INDIATONE 



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c/l 



NEW paper which is a revela- 
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A slow enlarging medium just 

right for the fast projection 
equipment now used in so many 
studios, yet suitable also for contact 
printing by screening down the lights. 

Rich in quality, long in scale, wide 
in latitude, and beautiful in its dis- 
tinctly professional tones, Indiatone 
is a paper meeting a definite need. 

Supplied in Cyltex surface — White 
and Buff — at Enlarging Cyko prices. 
You will like it. 




^qFA AnSCO CORPORATION, 5inqRAmTQN, n. ]]. 



PAGE 2 



'T- FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 

by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



JANUARY, 1930 



No. 1 



IN THE PROFESSION 



Oakland 

Albert Salb was born 
in Germany and came 
to this country at the 
age of three and a half, 
with his parents. They 
settled in Elgin, Illinois, 
where he spent his boy 
hood and youth attend' 
ing the public schools. 
He was a student at the 




" T/ie teaching 
profession suf- 
ered" 



University of Illinois at Urbana. 

At the University he met C. E. Kunsc, 
a well known newspaper man of San 
Francisco, who died last December. Mr. 
Kunze and Mr. Salb became very close 
friends. After they left the University 
they moved to Chicago and there planned 
to go west, to California. 

At the University he received a recom' 
niendation as a teacher of drawing and 
that summer he made application to the 
Fiske Teacher's Agency at Chicago for a 
position as teacher. For this application 
he had to have a photograph taken so 
he went to the Sackett Studio in Elgin, 
his home town, for the picture. During a 
talk with the proprietor, Mr. Sackett, he 
mentioned the fact that he was interested 
in photography and was told to come and 
try his hand at retouching. He learned 
it so readily that he was engaged by Mr. 
Sackett to retouch and learn the business. 
He has been in the business ever since. 



The teaching profession, of course, suf- 
fered . But such is fate. 

Mr. Salb left for the coast that year 
and went to Portland, Oregon, where he 
went to work for the Strong Studio. He 
stayed in Portland for about two years 
and then came to California. Stayed in 
California a few months and then re 
turned to Portland. Stayed there a few 
years and was married there. 

Shortly afterwards he opened a studio 
in Salem, Oregon, which he ran about 
a year and then disposed of it, and came 
to California again. He was associated 
with Mr. G. Edwin Williams, under the 
name of Williams and Salb, Home Por- 
trait Photographers, Hollywood. 

They dissolved partnership and Mr. 
Salb came north to Redding where he 
ran the Valentine Studio for a time. He 
then bought the Brady Studio at Peta- 
luma, stayed there for a number of years. 
He sold that studio and came to Oakland, 
where he has been for the last five years. 

The present studio is located at ?919 
College Ave., just about where Oakland 
and Berkeley meet. The location may be 
termed the business section of a high 
class residence district. Mr. Salb is active 
in civic affairs and the title often conferred 
on him, the Mayor of College Avenue, is 
really an appreciation of his services to 
the community. 

Mrs. Salb has been associated with Mr. 
Salb in his studios, and through her 
ability as a receptionist has contributed 
much to the success of the business. She 
is known everywhere for her geniality and 
devotion to duty. 



PAGE 3 




SURESTICK 

A White Liquid Photoyraph Glue 

Never Cracks Loose, no odor, always ready, does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints, will not get stiff ^vhen exposed to air. 

HIGH GRADE ADHESIVE — goes funher, only small amount required 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled — Half-pint, 55c; Pints, 90c 
Plain jars— Half-pint, 50c; Pint, 8 5c; Quarts, $1.50; Gallon, $5.00 



Smith Chemical Co. 



Defiance, Ohio 



Sold by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 




The INGENTO is easily superior to any other 
photo mailer on the market. There is no chance 
of breaking photographs, drawings, sketches or any 
other valuable matter when this mailer is used, as 
they are perfectly preserved by the double corrugated 
board which covers the photograph or drawing both 
fron and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. 
The various sizes we manufacture are made to take 
all the popular up-to-date mounts in use by the 
leading studious throughout the country. 

The new No. 1. Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
made 8^/^ x lli/^ inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8 X 10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board; it is idea] for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



The New INGENTO 
Photo Mailer 

has the only double seal feature of string 
fastener and gummed flap, making it pos- 
sible to mail photos to foreign countries 
or send them by first-class mail when pri- 
vacy or additional safet}' is desired. 

Made in the FoUoiving 
Popular ^izes 

No. 2 5>^x 7^ 

No. 3 6%x 8M 

No. 4 7>4x 9^ 

*No. 5 8^ X 10^ 

*No. 6 10^x12^ 

*No. 7 12^4 X 14^ 

*No. 8 10>/, xl5 

No. 9 6% X 914 

»No. 10 714x11^ 



*No. 11 8^x113/ 

*No. 12 13 xl7K' 

..No. 14 16 x20M 

Packed in cartons containing fifty. 

Manufactured by BURKE & JAMES, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH 8C KAYE 

SIZES for any need ! PRICES none can meet ! Prompt Shipments ! 



PAGE 4 



PICTURES ON METAL 
Without Sensitized Emulsion 

A fundamental discovery in photography 
that takes the "pictures" directly on 
cold, hard, untreated metal without 
the usual photographer's medium of a 
sensitized plate was made public at Cornell 
University. 

It reveals that seemingly impervious 
metal records on its surface unseen im- 
pressions from streams of electrons and 
that these marks can be brought into 
visibility by the right kind of a "de- 
veloper," exactly as photographic images 
are brought out on sensitized paper. 

The discovery opens a new field of 
scientific experiment, although at present 
there is no reason to suspect that elec 
trons, which the public knows as the 
invisible streams of power that flow from 
heated filaments into radio tubes, may 
replace light for photography. 

Are we going back to tintypes in a 
different manner? We can smile today at 
the tintype and other relics of the past. 
But "the sun do move" and who can 
look into the future and tell what phc 
togarphers will be giving their customers 
in 1955? 



Naturalization Now Requires 
Photos 

AN ACT of Congress, passed March 2, 
1929, requires that two photographs 
be submitted by each immigrant with 
his declaration of intention to become a 
citizen of the United States. It is estimated 
that 500,000 photographs will be required 
lor this purpose annually. 

The two photographs (identical) must 
be taken within thirty days of the date 
of application. 

They must be 2'/^x2!/'2 inches in size 
and printed on single weight, velvet or 
matte paper; glossy prints are not wanted. 
They must remain unmounted. 

The sitter should be posed against a 



white background, full front face, without 
hat, and showing both ears. The size of 
the face should be 1 inch from hair to 
chin and a white space Yi inch wide is 
to be left over the head for the applicant's 
signature. The latter may not be written 
anywhere else on the photographs. 

Aside from being of themselves a source 
of additional revenue, these pictures offer 
prospects or further business. As in the 
case of pictures for chauffeurs' licenses 
(where required) additional photographs 
can be sold; in fact, the possibilities should 
be greater, for the immigrant generally has 
a good many relatives and friends abroad 
to whom to send his photograph. 

It is a welhknown fact that orders from 
foreign residents in this country add 
greatly to the quantity of photographs 
made. His initial order is therefore worthy 
of careful attention, so that he may be 
made a constant customer and one who 
will recommend you to his friends. 

By showing the small photographs in 
attractive mountings you can increase the 
initial order. By making a somewhat 
longer negative, say 2j/2x3^ inches, larger 
mounted prints can be furnished. Samples 
of enlargements made from the same 
negatives are another idea. 



Life at bottom is not competitive. It is 
only in is unnatural states that cruel and 
ruinous competition steps in. The earth 
produces enough to give decent sustenance 
to every one. It is possible for labor, 
production, distribution and reward to be 
so organized as to make it certain that 
those who contribute to the social whole 
shall receive their individual share. 



No man was ever meanly born. About 
his cradle is the wondrous miracle of 
Life. He may live in infamy and perish 
miserably, but he is born great. 

- — Calvin Coolidge. 



PAGE 5 



-PROBUS- 

Saves the Surface 
of your photographic sinks and trays 

SE PROBUS for dark-room walls, 

U shelves, tables, etc. It lends itself splen- 
didly to home production of wooden 
trays, sinks and similar receptacles 
used in photographic work-rooms. Applied 
to wood, fibre or similar compositions, tin 
i)r iron, it rcndeis the material proof against 
water, acid, alkali, and rust. 

Just try Probus. This is the simple, 
modern, inexpensive way to keep your work- 
room equipment serviceable and looking like 
new. Merely a coating of Probus Preserv- 
ative Paint, and the trick is done. It is 
realb' remarkable how easily and quickly 
Probus can be applied — all by yourself, 
without any mess or worry. 

Probus is absolutely safe — It will not 
affect the most sensitive photographic solu- 
tion. You can't imagine how satisfactory 
Probus is, until you use it. 

Half Pint Trial Tin 45 cents 
ORDER TODAY FROM 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



Eastman Specialties 

lor the 

Photo-Engraver 

Compete Collodion — Silver Nitrate 
Rubber Solltion — Stripping Collodion 

Kodaline Negative Paper 

Wratten Process Panchromatic Plates 

Wratten Color Filters — Proofing Paper 

Engravers Hard Varnish 

Topping Powder 

Process Plates 6? Film — Commercial Film 

Mono'Lock Process Printing Frame 

All the items listed above are twice 
tested — in the Eastman laboratory and 
in their engraving department — to in- 
sure your complete satisfaction. You 
will find it true economy to use them 
in your plant. Write for prices, and 
for the booklets "Collodion and the 
Making of Wet Plate Negatives" and 
"Reproduction Work with Dry Plates 
and Films." 

In stock at 



HIRSCH & KAYE 



jra] 
Blue Print 



r 



PRINT IN 
SUNLIGHT 



EASY, CLEAR . 



DEVELOP IN 
WATER 

CHEAP! 



With this paper, you can print your nega- 
tives anywhere — at home, camping, mo- 
toring^ — wherever there is sunlight and 
water. 

It will bring out detail better than any 
other paper made. You will find new 
delights in your negatives that you never 
knew were there. 

And it costs half as much as ordinary 
photographic printing papers! 





PRICE LIST 


314 X 414 per package of 24 sheets, ^0.25 


?,14x5!/2 " 


.27 


4x5 


.30 


5x7 


.45 


6I/2 X 8I/9 " 


.60 


8 X 10 -' 


.90 


18 x22 , " 


"12 " 1.50 


Per 10 yard 


roll 25 in. wide . . 3.00 



PUTZ-POMADE 

_ An unexcelled friction reducer, 
applied with a cloth or a tuft of 
cotton. Skilled negative workers 
will not be without it. 

Per tin 25 cents 



H & K Soda Scales 




An accurate and durable scale for weighing 

photographic chemicals 

Capacity % ounce to 4 pounds 

Price, $4.00 



I'AGE 6 



1 



a Primt 



THE late great John Pierpont Morgan 
once sat for his portrait. Because he 
sat impatiently, badly, the painter 
wanted a photographer to help him. 
Banker Morgan agreed to allow a phc 
tographer just two minutes for the job. 
The next day he arrived punctually to 
find Photographer Edward J. Steichen, 27, 
waiting for him. Mr. Steichen had been 
there for a half'hour studying lights and 
shades, posing the janitor of the building 
in the chair where Banker Morgan would 
sit. Briskly he shunted the sitter to his 
seat. Banker Morgan sat down, glared 
into the lens. Snap. One picture was 
taken. Said Steichen: 

"Now — would you please sit a little 
differently? Just sv.'ing your head around 
and we'll have it." 

Mr. Morgan moved his head around, 
then .swung back into the identical posi' 
tion. But Photographer Steichen had got 
what he wanted — his subject had relaxed. 
It was the same pose, but more naturally 
and easily arrived at. Snap. Another pic 
ture. Exactly two minutes had elapsed. 

"I like you, young man. I think we'll 
get along first rate together." He arose 
and as he departed took out a wad of 
bills, flipped five $100 notes to the painter. 

"Give this to the young man," he said. 

When Photographer Steichen next saw 
Banker Morgan, he showed him prints of 
the two pictures. Banker Morgan liked 
the first, tense pose, ordered a dozen 
copies. The second. Photographer Stei- 
chen's favorite, showed the subject loom- 
ing characteristically massive out of Rem- 
brandtesque shadow. A trick of light 
made the chair arm look like a broad, 
naked knife in Banker Morgan's hand. 
Banker Morgan looked at this picture, tore 
it in shreds. 

Back in his studio went Photographer 
Steichen, sorely nettled. He labored over 
the second plate until he got a fine, en- 
larged print. He showed it around. Every 
body liked it. Dell da Costa Greene, able 
Morgan librarian, pronounced it the great- 
est portrait of her boss which she had 
ever seen. When she showed it to him, 
he declared he had never seen it before. 



authorized her to buy it. She made a 
bid of $5,000 to famed pioneer Photogra- 
pher Alfred Stieglitz, then editor of 
Camera Work, who owned the print. He 
refused. She then begged Photographer 
Steichen for another print. For three 
years he too refused. 

Meantime he took photographs and 
sent them to exhibitions. His work came 
to the notice of Alfred Stieglitz who then 
was championing rebel art-causes. In the 
New York Camera Club Steichen met 
Stieglitz. He showed his work and Stieg- 
lifz,, delighted, bought some prints at $5 
each. 

In Paris Steichen met the late great 
Sculptor Auguste Rodin. The two be- 
came fast friends. Steichen journeyed 
around France photographing people of 
repute and of no repute. When he finally 
decided that photography, not painting, 
was his metier, he bonfired all his can- 
vases. 

When the War came he was made a 
U. S .Colonel, chief of the Photographic 
Section of the Air Service. Under him 
were 55 officers, 1000 men. They flew 
over German lines, and "shot"' the enemy 
territory. Our Mr. Derby served in France 
under Col. Steichen. 

Today Edward Steichen is the highest- 
paid photographer in the country. For 
his cold cream and lotion ads, his celebri- 
ties for the Conde Nast smartcharts Vogue 
and Vanity Fair, he often receives $1,000 
a print. To his Manhattan studio have 
gone such notables as Henry Louis Menc- 
ken, Greta Garbo and Gloria Swanson. 

—"Steichen the Photographer," by his 
brother-in-law Poet Carl Sandburg — 
Harcuuil, Brace & Co. ($25). 



Every man pays for the amount of 
bossing he requires, and likewise every 
man's wages increase in proportion to his 
ability to act as a boss or foreman of him- 
self and others. The lower the wage rate, 
the greater the amounts of watching and 
direction constantly required. The highest 
wages are paid to the man through whose 
ability the largest number of men may be 
profitably employed. — Alfred Kauffman, 
president, Link-Belt Company. 



PAGE 7 



Make this Test ■ 

and Judge the Best 



^/V EiGH out equal amounts of ^j (,'//',,.-/,.:'/ Hydro- 
quinone and the material you are now using. 
Note the snow-white appearance of M. C. W. 
Hydroquinone. 




rf"-' 



\ HEN compare the clarity 
of the two solutions. 



JOiSSOLVE the two samples in 
the same quantity of sulphite 
solution. 




Mallinckrodt Hydroquinone \ 

will give the clearest solution ♦ 

p^OT only will it be free from any cloud, but no 
suspended matter of any kind will be found. 
Clearness of solution is a safe-guard against stain- 
ing and spotting and is an indication of 
unusual purity. 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since 18()7 
St. Louis : Montreal : Philadelphia : New York 



One of the 
"Physically aiul 
Chemically 
Perfected Photo 

Chemical!-" 



PAGE 8 



VERY MUCH NEEDED 

EVERY once in a while a group of 
photographers band together and form 
a local association and one of their 
first acts is to get out a publication of 
some sort. Many that we have seen are 
very clever and original, and no doubt 
serve a very useful purpose. 

A characteristic of some of these papers 
is an "exchange" or "for sale" section, 
but we have never seen an employment 
section. This brings us to the meat of 
the cocoanut. 

The sale or distribution of photographic 
merchandise is a function best undertaken 
by a stock house organized with a sales 
force that has more than local contact. 
The various associations, however, leave 
to the stock house the listing of prospec- 
tive studio employees, a matter that is of 
the greatest importance to the photog' 
rapher, but of little actual concern to the 
stock house. 

Employment in the photographic pre 
fession, especially at this time of the year, 
is a matter of uncertainty, and right now 
many good workmen are idle. These 
competent people should be listed at the 
association headquarters, and if rated as 
satisfactory, that rating in itself should be 
all the recommendation needed . 

It is understood that the service we 
give you at the Service Desk is given 
willingly, but we often question its value 
to the profession, for after all, it is usually 
nothing more than a list of names, sub' 
mitted without any knowledge of their 
past or ability. 

It is up to you, after all, to make the 
expensive trials to determine their worth. 
We believe an association clearing house 
nnd list of competent workers is one of 
the greatest benefits that can be created 
by and for association members. 

Because of the importance of this mat- 
ter, "The Focus" will be glad to receive, 
and if permitted, publish your opinion on 
this subject. What is your idea? 



CANVAS SURFACE 

On 

WHITE OR CREAM STOCK 

Many times you have wished for a 
canvas-surfaced paper and perhaps did not 
know wc could furnish it. Wellington 
C3anvas-Cream or White on doubleweight 
stock will produce pictures of unusually 
artistic tone. Try some. In stock at 
Hirsche 6? Kaye in 8x10 and 11x14 
packages of one dozen each. 

8x 10 . . ^1.25 per dozen net 
llx 14 . . 2.40 " " " 

Other grades of Wellington paper arc 
also in stock. 



Day- After-Tomorrow 

It is an easy thing to get into the rut 
and let day-after-tomorrow take care of 
the job that was set for today, or yester- 
day. If there was ever a habit which 
fastens its deadly tentacles into a waiting 
victim with surer effect, the world has not 
yet heard of it. Tomorrow is the day 
set for the job which should have been 
done today. But the pathetic part of it 
all is, that pretty soon it becomes day- 
after-tomorrow and so on, ad fiinitum. 

This is not an uncommon affliction. 
We all have it in some degree. But there 
is one sure way to rid ourselves of its de- 
moralizing effects and that is "build to- 
day's business on day-after-tomorrow's 
ideas." Keep planning in terms of the fu- 
ture, and future development. Keep your 
ideas two steps ahead of their solutions 
and you will have no worries about the 
future of your business. 



DEALERS' DISCOUNT ON 

EASTMAN ROLL FILM 

Wc now give you dealer's discount on 
orders for Eastman roll film intended for 
resale. Film packs are included in this 
discount, and you are assured of longest 
datings. 

Now go after the biggest film business 
you have ever had. Convenient order 
postals will be supplied and you can have 
all the window streamers you may need. 
Empty, dummy cartons and spools are 
available in limited amounts. 



PAGE 9 



For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-\)ert) 



Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

K-33 -" Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address Dept. No. 8 
1 lie Uevaerl v 'oiiipany ol i Vmerica, Inc. 



423-439 W. 55th St. 

Chicago, 111. 
4i:{-421 N. State Street 



New York City 

Toronto, Ont. 
347-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH & KAYE, 

San Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Drl>cnJablc Mcrcliatuiisc Lo^c Prices 



Master Finishers Hold 
Convention 

The Northern California division of 
the Master Photo Finishers held their 
midwinter convention in San Francisco on 
January H. Notwithstanding a storm 
that swept the state, the attendance was 
larger than ever before and we were 
impressed with the number of people who 
traveled a long distance to attend. 

The three leading speakers were: 
A. J. Cunningham of Utica, N. Y., 
R. J. Wilkinson of Jackson, Mich., 
M. C. Griswold, Eastman Kodak Co. 
Mr. Cunningham is national president 
of the Master Photo Finishers of America 
and reviewed the national convention re- 
cently held in Washington. He used 
motion pictures and lectures. He also 
gave an inspirational talk — "Selling the 
PubHc." 

Mr. Wilkinson is inventor of the Print' 
ometer mentioned in "The Focus" for 
December and is a successful finisher. 
He spoke on "Retail Profits" and "Pro' 
duction Methods." 

Mr. Griswold gave an illustrated talk on 
the Three Call Line, a retail selling idea 
which concerns every finisher. During 
the banquet, at night, he made an an' 
nouncement of great interest, the details 
of which will appear in the Eastman 
advertisement in the Saturday Evening 
Post, and other publications about May 1. 
Look for it. You will be interested. 

Another worth while factor of the one 
day convention was the dealers' display. 
Hirsch £s? Kaye displayed, among other 
things — 

Border Printer, Model B 

Midget Model 
Brunner Ferrotype Dryer 
Photo Mirror Machine. 



Standard Oil Contest Winners 
Announced 

The recent "Scenic or Signic" contest, 
conducted by the Standard Oil Co. of 
California, has been concluded. The con' 
test, intended to create interest in the 
preservation of natural beauty, consisted 
of two main sections. One provided 
prizes for the best articles on the subject, 
the other provided prizes for the best 
photos submitted in support of the ob' 
jective of the campaign. 

In the contest for photographs most 
effectively portraying actual defacement, 
Henry W. Cole's entry won the $200 first 
prize. Mr. Cole is of Lake Sutherland, 
Port Angeles, Washington. The other 
prize awards are $100 second prize to 
Elmer Cunningham, Sacramento, Califor' 
nia. A tie in third place brings a $7? 
full award to both B. G. Walker, Oakland, 
California, and Dr. C. W. Benson, Los 
Angeles, CaHfornia. The $50 fourth prize 
is to Mrs. Dorothy Allen, Reno, Nevada, 
and the $2y fifth prize to Dr. C. W. Ben- 
son, Los Angeles, California, who also 
won the tie award for third place. 



SUCCESS 

Captain Dollar is credited with com- 
pihng a list of members of the "Success 
Family" as follows: 

"The father of Success is Work. 

The mother of Success is Ambition. 

The oldest son is Common Sense. 

Some of the other boys are Persever- 
ance, Honesty, Thoroughness, En- 
thusiasm, Co'operation. 

The oldest daughter is Character. 
Some of the sisters are Cheerfulness, 

Loyalty, Courtesy, Care, Economy, 

Sincerity, Harmony. 

The baby is Opportunity. 

Get well acquainted with the 'Old 
Man' and you will get along pretty 
well with the rest of the family." 



PAGE 1 1 



nOLLlSTON PnOTO CLOTH' 

IS SdP-Adhesive 



Free from "Sting" 




HY bother with 
paste-pot, brush and 
scissors; why muddle 
with measuring, cutting, 
pasting and trimming? 

Holliston Photo Cloth 
is self-adhesive (but not 
gummed). It produces 
cloth-backed prints in 
one quick, clean, easy 
operation. They lie flat, 
but are flexible, and they 
positively do not fray 
at the edges. 

Furnished in white, blue 
or grey, seven standard 
sheet sizes. Packed in 
handy boxes. 

Write for samples 

Hirsch &l Kaye 

will supply you 





P ICT O L 

Mallinckrodt Pictol is fully equal 
to imported Metol and is used in 
exactly the same way. Does not affect 
the hands and Avill gi^-e vou 

1. Better Tones 

2. Greater Detail 

3. Longer-Lived Solutions 
Furnished in standard size bottles 
as follows : 

Oz. $ .52 list 

M lb. 1.60 " 

li " 3.08 " 

1 " 6.00 " 

5 " 29.50 " 

In stock at 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

Among the several outstanding 
articles in this ^^ar's American An- 
nual (now ready) is the article 
"Lighting and Hilighting" by J. W. 
Beattie. This article alone is of suf- 
ficient reason why you should have 
a copy of the American Annual. 

Have you ordered? 

Paper cover, $1.50; cloth, $2.25. 

LIKES OUR FRAMES 

"Please rush three more of those 
large easel frames #602, Silver, stip- 
pled and toned, 10x13. 

Just ,sold the onlv one left and have 
orders for two more ^vith oil colors 
in them. 

Ship by parcels post, express, or the 
best way for them to reach me safe 
and quick. Think we are going to 
have sale for your frame line here 
regularly. They are TAKING with 
the uers." 



I-AGE 12 



^^« THE FOCUS for JARUARlj 1930 ^@5^.... 



Border Printer 

for Kodak Prints 

Now Available in Two Sizes 




VAKAGRAPH MODEL B 

The holder gives the print the finishing 
touch. It is the frame to the picture. With 
this machine you can put out a class of 
work that is different than the other fel- 
low's around the corner. 

Its simplicity of operation commends it to 
those who are about to embark in the photo 
printing business, and makes it more prof- 
itable for those who are already in this 
business. 

This machine was designed and built 
for the rapid production of photographic 
prints. Its completeness and its workman- 
ship alone mark it as a long step forward 



in the perfecting of photo printing ma- 
chines. 

This machine prints the border, if you 
want it, if not, the white margins. 

Eight sizes of borders furnished with 
large machine as follows: 127-120-116-118- 
101-122-124-130 and special sizes may also 
be added if _vou wish. Only one design of 
border to each set is supplied. 

Each print is numbered at the time that 
picture is printed and at a very small extra 
cost vour name or other trade mark can be 
made to appear on the back of print with 
the order number. 

Borders will let you charge at least a 
cent more per print if you wish. This 
machine is furnished with a stand made of 
hard wood and finished in satin black, and 
all metal parts are finished in white nickel. 
The shipping weight is 150 lbs. and the 
floor space needed is thirty-six by twenty 
inches. The machine will be ready for 
use when you receive it. 

There are many angles to border print- 
ing; such as using 3our own special border 
design and having worked up in this de- 
sign your trade mark, and this one feature 
alone should be worthy of your earnest 
consideration. Of course this type of bor- 
der is extra expense, but well worth every 
cent it costs. 

Light box: Use four 75-watt lights and a 
pilot light in the center. These lights can- 
not be turned on until the platen and 
printing contact has been made, and must 
be off before platen can be raised. 

Each size mask is complete, and may be 
removed without disturbing its register 
when another size is to be printed. Chang- 
ing from one size to another is done in 
an instant. 

With the use of this model B border 
printer, competition is not to be feared. 

The platen and paper holding arrange- 
ment and lights are at all times under the 
operator's control at the handle. 

DESCRIPTION SENT ON REQUEST 

Price, Model B, $200 
Midget (table) Model, $80.00 

{Terms if desired) 
NOW is the time to order 

from 

HIRSCH & KAYE 



PAGE 13 



"SUCCESSES PILE UP 



9} 



Picturing with 

Special Brands for Special Work, 

with emulsions made and tested 

in Hammer laboratories, 

is bringing to the studio 

better results and more money 

with less labor. 



Make negatives 

that not only have detail 

but have a roundness of tone values 

in the highlights and in the shadows, 

necessary for the better print. 



RES. trade: mark 



Write for portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



Ohio Ave. k Miami St. 
St. Louis 



159 West 22nd St. 
New York City 



Stop Waste. Save Time, Money, Solutions. 
For best results install a 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFIT 



AMATEUR FINISHING OUT- 
FIT for Roll Film and Circuit Work Made of the 

FINEST 
PORCELAIN 
ENAMEL 

THE BEST BY 
TEST 



Fwo Sizes Commercial Outfits for Plates 
and Cut Films. 





Made in 2 sizes. 
5x12x42" hold 10 gallons 
8x12x42" hold 17 gallons 
Both blue and white tanks. 



ALL WATER- 
JACKETED OUT- 
FITS have washing 
space with circulat- 
ing water around Sizes No. 1 accommodates both 5x7 
both inner tanks for and 8x10 Portrait Hangers. Size No. 2 
temperature regula- is built for 5x7's only, 
tion. 

COMPLETE White Enameled Fixing Baths 

COMPACT 
ECONOMICAL 

Light in weight. 
^l Easily handled and 
cleaned. Durable, 
-^— and Efficient. 

Avoid Spurious 
Tanks. Name "Ster- 
ling" on Ever y 
Tank. 




STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 

'Pioneer Tank Builders," Beaver Falls, Pa. 



12x16x5" 
18x24x6" 



Stock: Sizes 

16x20x6" 
20x24x6" 



10x12x5" 
18x22x5" 
20x30x6" 



PAGE 14 



A VARIETY OF GREETING 
CARDS 

Christmas time brings to us a period 
of intense activity, extra work and unforc 
seen problems that must quickly be solved. 
But Christmas time also brings a flood of 
greetings from our friends that make the 
other things quickly forgotten. 

Each year the number of greeting 
cards received from customers increases. 
And so does the variety. We have in 
mind the imitation baloney (made of 
candy), sent by Mr. Schriner, the several 
timely cartoons, as received from the Art 
Craft Studio, and the many more original 
photographs, as sent by the Alta Studios. 
Some of the cards evidenced much labor 
(hand painted). We wish space would 
permit us to list and acknowledge the 
greetings sent to individuals in our firm 
and to the firm. Please accept this as 
our acknowledgment, our thanks, and our 
means of wishing you a year of all good 
things in 1930. 



Photographing Machinery 
by Flashlight 

This is the name of a booklet prepared 
by the James H. Smith 6? Sons Co. It 
will be a big help to the commercial pho' 
tographer and the all round studio man 
who is often called upon to take unusual 
pictures. 

The book was written by D. F. Davis, 
a Salt Lake City photographer, and is 
well illustrated with detailed diagrams of 
the pictures reproduced. You should 
have a copy, and one will be sent on 
request. 



"PATHWAY" SUGGESTIONS 

How about the folks who move away? 
Circularize them. Offer to sell them pic 
tures of the old home town, pictures of 
the scenes they are familiar with. You 
may have pictures of relatives or friends 
and acquaintances which they would like 
to have. Or you can take them, if you 
do not already have the negatives. There 
is a real pull of aifection that ties the 
awayfrom-home back to the old scene 



and the old friends. It will pull business, 
if you go after it. 

V- 
It pays to watch the death notices in 
the papers. A week or 10 days after the 
death, write a letter to the wife, husband, 
son or daughter and suggest that you can 
make splendid enlargements or copies of 
photographs which they may have of 
the deceased. And you may have old 
negatives in file from which they will 
want prints. 

v. 

Does "everybody know you"? Some 
photographers think that there is no need 
for them to advertise in their cities. 
"Everybody knows me." But newcomers 
moving in, children growing up, folks 
moving away, soon change entirely the 
trade picture of a community. You might 
be surprised if you have somebody make 
a little test on the streets by trying to 
find just where you are located by asking 
for you by name. The remedy — good 
display sign, advertising! 

H & K Film Inspection Glass 




A convenient and practical device for 
film editing. 

Smooth running rollers keep the 16 MM. 
film in proper position for convenient in- 
spection, and a Mazda lamp enables you 
more plainly to view the pictures. The 
magnifying feature of this accessory makes 
it easy to detect faults in the film, correct 
the order of pictures, and quickly deter^ 
mine where titles are to be inserted. 
Price ^8.50 postpaid 
Sold subject to ten days trial. 



PAGE 1 5 



■.-^. THE FOCUS for J^NUARl] 1930 .@^ 




Ed Stark, one of the owners of the 
Alta Studio, San Francisco, died after a 
Hngering illness on December 7. For a 
while it looked as though he would re- 
cover, but stomach trouble is a serious 
affair. His brother Zan will continue the 
studio. 

S 

Ford E. Samuel, Oakland photographer, 
lives in Alameda, and recently was ap' 
pointed a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of his home city. This is an honor 
of unusual nature, but we know he will 
be equal to the occasion. 

Foto News, the unique "sheet" of the 
East Bay Commercial Photographers Club, 
of Oakland, has again been received. It 
really is clever. Too bad they don't make 
duplitized paper, sensiti2;ed on both sides 
like X'Ray film. Then the type would 
be bigger. Meanwhile, we wonder if their 
aitist would draw for "Focus." (?) 

Another card arrived from Nate Farb- 
man, photographer on board the S. S. 
Malola on the S. F. Chamber of Com- 
mercc good-will tour. He will have some 
worth while negatives when he returns. 



When a photographer takes a picture 
he usually gets paid for it, but when some- 
one takes the picture the photographer 
took, it's time to call the police. E. J. 
McCuIlagh, Berkeley, had an enticing pic- 
ture of "Miss Berkeley" in his showcase 
until one midnight, when the case was 
pried open and the picture taken. No 
other pictures were disturbed and Berkeley 
being a college town, we have a sugges- 
tion for Sherlock Holmes. However, the 
incident gave Mr. McCullagh a lot of 
publicity. 

Daniel Freeman, Monterey, was a pre- 
holiday visitor in San Francisco. For sev- 
eral decades, Mr. Freeman has been an 
occasional and very welcome caller at 
our offices. 

S 

C. F. Kohler has returned from his trip 
thru Europe and is again at the helm 
at his Broadway Studio in Los Angeles. 



Sydney Walton of the San Francisco 
De Forest Studio was severely burned on 
his left hand by the premature ignition 
of flash powder. 



PAGE 16 



^ 



-^. THE FOCUS for J^RU^RU 1930 «@^- 



Mrs. Gladys J .Butler of the Cook & 
Cook Studio in Oakland cut her left index 
finger on a metal trimmer in September. 
She went to the doctor for treatment, but 
infection set in and it was necessary later 
tc amputate the finger at the second 
knuckle. She is again at her post, cheer' 
ful as ever, and is quite willing that we 
should mention this as a warning to others 
who may also suffer a so-called insignifi' 
cant cut. 

A visit by H, E. Roberts and his wife 
was very much enjoyed. Especially after 
seeing a few of his colored views of the 
country east of General Grant National 
Park which created a desire to forget rush 
orders, and plan the next vacation. As 
you may have surmised, Mr. Roberts is 
photographer at General Grant Park and 
when you are near the park, drive in and 
get acquainted with him. His wife, by 
the way, is an excellent colorist. 

A recent visit of the stork has made a 
Grandpa out of our trans-bay represent' 
ative Derby, We are happy to report that 
the young mother and child are doing 
splendidly. The father is holding his own. 



E. O. Webb of San Jose has installed 
a Brunner Automatic Ferrotype Dryer in 
I'.is new store. This dryer is making a hit 
with the trade. It is priced right and in 
the parlance of the street, "cuts the mus- 
tard." Write us for a circular. 



Mr. Carl Morey Egginton, noted por- 
trait artist, formerly of San Francisco and 
more recently of Los Angeles, has opened 
a finely equipped and appointed studio at 
Monterey in the San Carlos Hotel Build' 
ing. He is to be a very busy man, we 
prophesy . 

Walter Allen of Palo Alto with an 
associate, C. D. Dutton, has perfected a 
border tinting printer that appears to have 
great possibilities. They plan, as soon as 
production difficulties are solved to place 
the printer on the market. 

Mrs. C. Les Meister has returned to 
Monterey and has opened an attractive 
Spanish type studio. On a recent visit to 
Monterey, we found her a bundle of 
activity. 

J. L. Wiley at the old Hartsook location 
in Visalia has completely remodeled the 
studio and has added many items of up' 
'to-the-minute equipment. 

H. A. Staples of Chico, W. S. Valentine 
of Redding, Frank Webb of Hanford, 
Nelle Stone of Napa and Charl Egginton 

of Monterey were recent welcome visitors 
to our store. 



Miss Maude Wilson of Palo Alto re- 
cently had returned to her a highly prized 
family album which had been stolen with 
other effects from her home over twenty- 
five years ago. A family friend found it 
on the shelves of a second'hand store in 
Montana and recognizing the childhood 
pictures of Miss Wilson, purchased the 
album, still intact, and forwarded it to her. 
Which goes to prove that all of Life's 
Drama is not to be fcJund within the cov' 
ers of a story book. 



Frank Webb, aerial photographer of 
Hanford, has been "skylarking" over 
Southern California with his camera. 
When we say this fellow knows his stuff 
we mean it. He has the best equipment 
that money can buy, and his aerial shots 
are gaining him a statewide reputation. 
Aside from photography, he is also a 
"crackin" good pilot. His war'time ex' 
periences over the front lines would fill 
a book. 



PAGE 17 



(^'^►^^rt) IFoir (r>^^?^ 



After^tlie Holiday Besmess 



Here is a style that makes your medium priced portraits look better 
than ever. 




THE STANFORD 

Veinstone stock — both cover and insert. Design is raised in duo 
tinting — edges of insert criis^hed. 

IVIade in all popular sizes from 2x3 to 8x10. Prices range from 
$4.85 to $14.50. The 4x6 size, for instance, lists at only $7.50 per 100. 

Be sure to see it — you will specially want the smaller sizes for 
school work. 

Samples of both colors for 10 cents and we will include 
sample of the ARENA, the companion line for 
hori2;ontal prints. A fine combination to feature. 

SAMPLE OFFER F-93 



TAPMELL. LOOMIS & CO. 



(Eastman Kodak Company) 



Chicago, Illinois 



PAGE 18 



■0 




"JERRIJ 


'S" 


CORNER 


By HimSELF 





The day after New Year's I got to 
work late. The shipping clerk says why 
are you late. Jerry, and I says — -When I 
looked in the mirror this morning I 
couldn't see myself, so I figured I had 
come to work. After a while I found the 
glass had dropped out of the frame, so 
here I am. 

That shows that we should stop once 
in a while to check up. Not to see where 
we are, but to see where we're at. 

First you put down on a piece of paper 
(enlarging paper is best), 3,000 dollars 
cash on hand. Sure, I know you haven't 
got that much, and about $3.00 is all 
you've got, but those extra ougnts make 
you look like a big business man. They 
are what some people call the best circles. 

Then you add accounts receivable. 
That includes the $12 Mrs. Brown owes 
you for 2 years and promised to pay last 
Christmas. 



Now your about half thru. Take 
another piece of paper (not enlarging, 
and put down bills payable. Be sure to 
put in your H 6? K bills. Next comes 
the Federal income tax, but photograph' 
ers dont pay income tax, so that helps 
a little. 

You have to take off your appreciation. 
By the time you do this, you find you owe 
your backgrounds, lenses and cameras a 
lot of money. To offset this you put 
down on the credit side something like 
8 3 cents. Thats your good will. 

If you had a real surplus last year, add 
that in and when you figure wages, be 
sure to include some for the wife and 
kids what helped you. 

Now bring the two pieces of paper 
together. Add up what you got and take 
off what you owe — 

And say your prayers. 



Then you count your cameras, lenses, 
backgrounds and what have you. Sure, 
you put down what they cost when you 
bought them. Next year add some tangel' 
able assets like string and your solvent 
credits like your hypo and sulphite. If 
you have any intangible assets on paper, 
put them in, too. 

Theres some other things to take off. 
If you had a new roof put on, thats 
charged up as overhead. Your running 
expenses include that leaky faucet, also 
messenger service. 



After you add all these together, you 
have a lot of figures and you think you 
made a lot of money. But wait. 

Maybe you don't know how to take a 
mvent'cry so heres how you do it. 

"Some of these bank tellers are pretty 
.slick with their fingers. I seen a feller in 
one o' the banks, and blow me if he 
didn't have to keep a wet sponge along' 
side t<j keep his fingers from getting red 
hot. He told me so himself." 

JERRY. 



PAGE 19 




By Courtesy of the 
Universal Piclurea 
Corporation 



Repeat orders say 

Quality 



The best measure of quality is re- 
peat orders — unmistakable testimo- 
nials which prove, beyond question, 
that a product is giving satisfaction. 

The astonishing increase in the 
sale of Agfa Portrait Film in 1929 is 
gratifying for two reasons — its dem- 
onstration of the willingness of pho- 



tographers to try what to them is 
new, and its demonstration of their 
willingness to adopt it if they find 
it good. 

The satisfactory experience of thou- 
sands of professional photographers 
throughout the world will suggest to 
those who have not yet tried it the 
use of Agfa Portrait Film in 1930. 




PORTRAIT FILM 



AGFA AlVSrO CORPORATION. II I X « H AM T O IV . X. Y 



PAGE 20 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



Duncan G. Blakiston 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photoprraphic Prints Executed in Oil, 

Water Color, Black and White Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 4 20 - - Phone Prospect 476 



For Best 
Retouching, Etching 

and 

Prompt Service 

Send Your Negatives to 

E. K. HALVERSON 

IfiO FELL STREET 
San Francisco 

Hemlock 4638 California 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 

5703 College Avenue 

OAKLAND - - CALIF. 



DON'T EXPEPvIMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

U9I6 STEINER STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



STUDIO IN OAKLAND, CALI- 
FORNIA : In center of highest 
class shopping- district. Full}^ 
equipped 8x10, 7x11, 6x8, 5x7, 
enlarging, copying, and home 
portrait. Established in dis- 
trict 14 years. Owner's inter- 
ests in another city demand all 
his time. Box 2260. 



Retouching — Etching — 
Negative Work 

Send your order to 

ANNE ROSTON 

2341 Bay St., San Francisco 
WEst :ifi(i:i 




Angle Reflector for Mazda Lamps 

The Angle Reflector is just the thing where a 
photographer desires to make up a bank of Mazda 
lamps for his studio, or wherever it is desired to 
mount a lamp by suspension. A popular way is 
to hang them on the skylight to assist daylight. 

Diameter 14 inches, Mogul socket, without globe 
or wiring. 



PRICE 



$10.50 



PAGE. 21 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury J'apor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc lamps. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH (Sl KAYE 



When Retouching use A. W. Faber's 



THE FINEST PENCIL MADE 

17 degrees of hardness 6 degrees for positive 1 degree sepia 

WRITE US YOUR NEEDS OR TELL OUR SALESMEN 



BETAX ^^ 

GAMMAX 

DELTAX 




THREE 

GOOD 

SHUTTERS 



pOR those who require extreme accuracy in exposures and simple sturdy 
construction to wdthstand hard usage, these improved shutters will make a 
strong appeal. 

An outstanding feature in this new line of shutters is our gearless, pumjp- 
less retarding mechanism which is simple in construction and positive in action 
assuring accurate and unvarying speeds. 

Metal diaphragm leaves and shutter blades are incorporated in these 
models which are ideal for enlarging where heat is intense. 

The Betax, Gammax and Deltax shutters are automatic in operation and 
can be released either Avith the wire release, or bulb and hose, (with the aid of 
a bulb attachment. Finished in black lacquer with gold engravings. 

Beltax, Time Bulb, 1-100, 1-50, 1-25, 1-10, 1-5, 1-i 

Gammax, Time Bulb, 1,100, 1-50, 1-25, 1-10 

Deltax, Time Bulb, 1,100, 1-50, 1-25, 

'Maximum speed of three larg-er Betax shutters is 1-50. 



No. 



Light 
Opening 



Lens 
Opening 



Betax 



Gammax 



Deltax 



9/16 



1 

1% 
1% 
2% 



in. 
in. 



17/32 in. 

1-1/16 in. 

1-7/32 in. 

1-25/32 in. 

2-3^ in. 

2-29/32 in. 



$10.00 

10. 00 

12.00 
15.00 
18.00 
22.50 



$4.00 
5.00 
6.00 



$3.50 
4.50 



Prices include flange and wire release. 



PAGE 22 




Things you should 
-^ know — 

Helpful Hints from Here and There 

Precautions Against Fire 



I should be realized that nitrate film is 
inflammable and will ignite either 
when brought into contact with an 
open flame or when heated to a suffi' 
ciently high temperature even in the 
absence of a flame. For instance, if a 
piece of nitrate film is placed on a hot 
radiator it is liable to ignite. 

In order to prevent the possibility of 
a fire, it is necessary to observe the fol' 
lowing precautions: (a) Use no open 
flames, unless carefully shielded, as in a 
properly designed film drying cabinet, 
(b) Enforce the "No Smoking" rule rig- 
idly. Employees should not be allowed 
to carry matches into the plant, and they 
should sign a "No Matches" chart daily 



Here's a thought from Camera Craft for 
the photographer who is subject to Metol 
poisoning and yet objects to wearing rub' 
ber gloves or finger cots. Get a pint can 
of Victory white rubber cement (your 
dealer carries it) and paint the fingers 
which you usually dip into the developer 
up as far as the second joint. When 
finished developing, wash off the coating 
with benzine, gasoline, naptha or some- 
thing of the sort, or just peel off the 
coating with a finger of the other hand. 
It rolls off readily. 



To Photograph Silverware 

Hollow ware may be filled with ice or 
very cold water; then in a warm damp 
room the outer surface will become dewed. 
Dabbing the surface with putty will also 
kill all reflections. Os the object may be 
placed inside a tunnel of tissue paper, so 
that the light reaching it has to pass 
through the paper. 



before starting work. All matches used 
in the plant should be of the safety type. 

The firse hazard should be carefully 
considered in designing the film drying 
cabinet. To carry off dangerous gases 
from burning film in the event of a fire 
in the cabinet, the exhaust pipe should 
always lead to open air outside the build' 
ing. If a gas burner is used, it must be 
so located and shielded that there will be 
no possibility of its igniting any pieces of 
film that may be dropped on the floor 
of the cabinet and blown about by the 
air currents. 

Have the construction details of the 
drying cabinet approved by your local 
inspector. — (Foto Finisher.) 



Repairing an Enameled Developing 
Tank 

Having trouble with our enameled steel 
film developing tank, a leak having dc 
veloped in one corner, we sought ways 
and means for "getting by" with the next 
day's work until we could get another 
tank. 

After draining and drying the tank we 
obtained a small size can of Smooth'On 
No. 1 and mixing a small quantity as 
directed we forced this into the opening, 
first of course, cleaning away all loose 
rust and dirt. After allowing to dry for 
two hours we applied Probus Paint and 
filled the tank ready to go, we tried this 
also on steel enameled trays used for acid 
stop bath and thus far it has been very 
successful. 

— Suggestion submitted by a reader. 



PAGE 23 



Fkslhliglhit Pietares 

rVT this season the advantages of Flash- 
light Photography are most apparent. 
Professional photographers, both portrait 
and commercial, likewise amateur photog- 
raphers, ought to make full use of materials 
placed at their disposal. 
We carry complete stocks of Flashlight 
equipment and Flashlight materials. The 
products of all leading manufacturers are 
here for your selection. 



Ingento Sure Shot Flash Lamps 
The Clergy Shur-Fire Flash Gun 
Caywood Flash Lamps 
Victor Electric Flash Lamps 
Auto Dependable Flash Lamps 
Marshall Meteor Flash Lamps 



Agfa Flash Lamps 

Halldorson Flash Lamps 
Imp Flash Gun 
Spredlite Flash Lamps 
Flashrite Gun 

Eastman Flash Specialties 



Illustrnted Descriptive Circulars ivill be sent upon request 



^HE Eastman Auto-Focus Enlarger offeers to the photographer or photo finisher the advan- 
■ tages of projection printing in an outfit that sells at an exceptionally attractive price. 

It takes negatives 5x7 inches and smaller, en- 
larging from \y2 to 4 diameters, the maximum 
print size being 20 x 28 inches. 

The camera moves on an upright track and is 
counterbalanced by a spring tape. A specially de- 
signed cam on the standard maintains accurate focus 
at all times. A slight pressure on the operating 
handle moves the camera up or down to change the 
image size — a half turn locks it in place. 

The negative holder accommodates film or plate 
negatives 5 x 7 or smaller and four masking slides 
are readily adjusted to mask out any portion of the 
negative. The paper holder has movable masking 
arms for prints up to 20 x 28 inches and a margin 
gauge is adjustable for white margins from '4 to 
21^ inches. 

The lens is the Ea.stman Anastigmat f.4.5, 7^/^-inch 
focal length and the 25 0-watt Projection Mazda Lamp 
is in a thoroughly ventilated lamp house. A foot 
switch controls the light while the enlarger will stand 
on a bench or table of as small dimensions as 
2fi X 30 inches. Overall height of machine extended 
is 69 inches, width, 29 inches, depth, 2 9 inches. 

Eastman Auto-Focus Enlarger, complete, including ."> x 7 camera with Eastman f.4.."» 

Anastigmat lens, two U.">0-watt lamps, paper holder, foot switch and electric cord, ."SIT.'.OO 

Eastman Diffusing Discs, set of three -.I.OO 

Supplied separately, each.. 10.00 

Reducing attachment, shown attached to Enlarger .'50.00 

TERMS IF DESIRED 




PAGE 24 




No. 1277 

Siber Only 

7x9% only 

$3.00 each 

Remarkable Ualuesl 

Big' Assortment! 




No. 314 

Platinum Finish Onli^ 

4%x6% or 7x9% 

$3.00 each 



Good Frames help to sell 

POTOQRAPHS 

Good Photographs help to sell 

"PRAITIESI 

Pig Profits 

Small Inueslment 




No. H 306 
(Horizontal) 

Silver (Toned) 

or 

Platinum (Toned) 

7x9% only 

$3.00 each 

QUALITY is a feature of every one of 
these beautiful frames. They are carefully 
assembled — highly burnished — and finished 
neatly in attractive tones. The platinum 
finish is a Httle warmer than the tone, 
making perfect color harmony for photo- 
.i^raphs or pictures of any color. 

All frames have FELT BASES. 

Seventeen styles, sizes 4 x 6 to lOx 13. 
Horizontal and vertical. Silver, Platinum, 
Polychrome tones. 

Low Prices. Goods in stock. 

Write to 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 






PAGE 25 



Annual Publications 

Every photogi^apher should read at least one of the annual 
publications that will soon be released. The latest methods of 
technique, formulse and practice are outlined and the reproduction 
pictures are something to inspire anyone with new enthusiasm. 

NOTICE THE ASSORTMENT WE OFFER 

The American Annual Photography, 43rd volume, printed on 
the finest coated paper and containing- one hundred or more repro- 
ductions of the best American and foreign photographs of the year 
together with numerous practical articles, formulary and other 
information. Price, paper $1.50, cloth $2.25. Now ready. 

Das Deutsche Lightbild. A magnificent year book with beauti- 
fully reproduced photographs and a number of valuable technical 
articles in both German and English. Last year's volume of this was 
undoubtedly the finest pictorial annual ever published. Price $3.75. 

Photograms of the Year 1929. The international annual of pic- 
torial photography containing selected prints from the best workers 
of all countries with valuable criticism of the pictures and other 
interesting text. Price, paper $2.50, cloth $3.50. 

The British Journal Photographic Almanac. The big book of 
photography with practical articles, numerous beautiful pictures in 
lotogravure and the well-known advertising section. Price, paper 
$1.00, cloth $1.50. 

The Pictorial Work of the Royal Photography of Great Britain, 
1929. A volume of reproductions of the finest photographs from 
this year's Royal Photographic Society Exhibition, with a running- 
commentary and criticism by Mr. Tilney. Price, paper $2.50, 
cloth $3.50. 

The Year's Photography. The annual number of the Royal 
Photographic Society's Journal with description and illustration of 
its annual exhibition of technical and pictorial photographs from all 
over the world. Price, paper $1.25. 

Penrose's Annual. The Process Year Book and Review of the 
Graphic Arts, 1929. This book contains valuable articles on the 
year's progress in photo engraving and printing methods with beau- 
tiful monotone and full color reproductions by all the most beautiful 
processes known. Price, cloth $4.00 

The Japan Photographic Annual. Text partly in English, 
mainly in Japanese . Beautiful reproductions of Japanese work only. 
A much larger volume than last year's book. Price, $3.00. 

The Second International Photographic Salon on Japan, 1929. 

Beautiful full page repioductions of photographs from all over the 
world, exhibited in Japan in 1929. Price, $4.00. 

The Supply is limited. Order your copies today. 



PAGE 26 



Ain't We Got Fun! 

About a year ago, a novel contest was 
held in our office with results that were 
interesting. As the first of 1929 ap' 
proached, one of our order clerks pre 
dieted that a certain customer would send 
us the first order of the New Year. Other 
opinions were voiced, and soon the entire 
organization was in the contest, each hav 
ing picked what would appear to be a 
winner. 

The results were so far beyond anyone's 
expectation that it was rather difficult to 
say just which order was the first because 
orders arrived by regular mail, air mail, 
special delivery and telegram. A few of 
the orders were written out and slipped 
under the door on New Year's day. 

This year, the contest was repeated, 
but in a little different manner. The 
question was, would So-and-So send us 
an order which would he his or her first 
order for the year 1930. Again the results 
were watched with interest and you would 
have enjoyed looking in on the opening 
ol the morning mail lor the first few 
mornings of January. The response is 
very much appreciated by the manage' 
ment and employees. 



How to Tell the Sensitized 
Side of an Eastman Film 

It is a lucky photographer who has 
never failed to get the film in the holder 
right side up. To obviate mishaps of this 
kind there is placed in each box of East- 
man professional and cut films an instruc- 
tion sheet. Because the boxes are opened 
in the dark room this sheet of instructions 
is not always noticed. It reads as follows: 
"Two V-notches will be felt in one edge 
of each film. This is a guide for deter- 
mining the sensitized side. When the 
film is so placed that the notches are on 



the upper edge and at the right-hand 
corner, the emulsion or sensitized side is 
face up." It has been aptly suggested 
that Eastman would help the photog- 
rapher considerably by printing instruc- 
tions of this kind on the outside of the 
box and on all envelopes containing cut 
films. 



Are You Too Familiar 
With Your Studio? 

Too great a familiarity with your studio 
IS likely to breed oblivion to its faults. 
It is a good thing for every photographer 
occasionally to leave his own work shop 
and call on his fellow photographer in a 
nearby city and observe how he is con- 
ducting his business. See how his studio 
looks; what equipment he is using; how 
he treats his customers; what new ideas he 
has developed in the course of the year 
to make for greater efficiency in his studio 
or for better work. 

If you remain too close to your own 
studio, you soon become so familiar with 
its routine that you fail to discover any 
faults in it. You go on day after day, 
doing things exactly as you did them the 
day before, and the day before that. 
No new ways of doing things better ever 
enter your mind. 

But the minute you step into someone 
else's studio you notice everything — you 
are able to observe with an open mind 
whether it is good or bad — whether such 
and such a practice could be put into 
practical use in your studio. You are 
able to compare your fellow workman's 
methods with your own and to discard 
those that are faulty and adopt those that 
are good. 

Make up your mind, now that the 
Christmas rush is over, to take a vacation 
of a day or two to visit studios similar 
to your own in surrounding towns. You 
will be surprised when you return how 
iresh a viewpoint it will give you on your 
own studio and its faults and virtues. 

— Lieber's Photo News. 



Py\GE 27 



^t THE FOCUS for JATlTlARlj 1930 »^-- 

gains for the Photographer 



No, 
No 
No. 240 
No. 246 
No. 162 
No. 160 
No. 157 
No. 154 



123 Photo Mailers 
234 " 



4% X 7 Special price per hundred $1.00 

51/2x111/4 

61/2x13% 

71/2x15% 
13y4xl7i/2 
12 X 18 
1214x1614 
121/2 x 141/2 

CARBON TISSUE 

2 Bands No. 145 Grey Green 



« 


u 


2.00 


u 




2.50 


u u 




3.30 


(( a 




. ... 5.20 


a a 




.. 5.00 


u u 




4.80 


a It 




4.50 



39 

4 
6 
1 
1 



No. 149 Dark Red 

No. 150 Ruby Brown 

No. 169 Van Dyke Brown 

No. 168 Ink Pot 

No. 90 Single Transfer 



2 Bands No. 95 Chocolate Red 

10 " No. 103 Warm Black 1 

No. 105 Sepia 10 

No. Ill Cool Sepia 1 

No. 113 Portrait Brown 2 

No. 139 Rose Pink 8 
No. 140 Bottle Green 

Offered at 33-1/3% from standard list. 

(12 rolls, 40%. May be assorted.) 

SCREENS 
To reduce a surplus stock to normal, we offer subject to prior 
sale, the following- motion picture screens : 



2 Type D Bead Screens 


15 X 20 


list 


price 


$10.00 each 


2 " E " 


36 X 48 


" 


it 


22.50 " 


1 " E 


39 X 52 


(( 


it 


25.00 " 


3 " D 


39 X 52 


" 


" 


27.50 " 


8 # 1 Eastman folding " 


30 X 40 


(( 




25.00 " 


3 #2 " " . " 


39x52 




" 


35.00 " 



These are new screens and special prices will be withdrawn 
as soon as surplus is sold. Write for Bargain Prices! 

INTERESTING BOOKS 

"Roentgen Interpretation" $3.00 list price 

"Systematic Dev. of X-Ray Plates and Films" 2.00 " " 

"U. S. Army X-Ray Manual" 4.50 " " 

"X-Ray Technique" by Hirsch 10.00 " " 

"Interpretation of Dental and Maxillary Roentgenograms" , 2.75 " " 

"Dental Radiography" by Raper 7.75 " " 

"X-Rays and Crystal Structure" by Bragg 4.00 " " 

"Essentials of Medical Electricity" 3.00 " " 

"Manual of X-Ray Technique" by Chri.stie 3.25 " " 

"Electro Radiographic Diagnosis," by Rayer 3.75 " " 

"Practical Electro-Therapeutics & X-Ray Therapy" by Martin 4.00...." ".. 

WHILE THEY LAST — LESS 50% FROM ABOVE PRICES 



PAGE 28 



Bargains for the Photographer 



Bargain Packag-es — first time offered 
(soki only in lots as listed.) 

Bargain Package No. 1 Price 75c 

1 Ajax Candle Lamp with red glass. 

1 2-oz. Measuring Glass 

1 3^4 x4i/4 Print Frame with glass 

3 4x5 Glass Trays 

1 Porcelain Drain to hold 12 negatives 

1 copy Principles of Simplified 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
1 Agfa Manual for beginners 

Bargain Package No. 2 Price $3.95 

1 Glass Mortar & Pestle (not exceed 

16-oz. size) 
3 7x9 Composition Trays 
15x7 Glass Fixing Box for Hypo 
1 Wood Negative Rack — capacity 25 

plates 
1 Zinc or galvanized iron Washing 

Box for 4 x 5 or smaller plates. 

Bargain Package No. 3 Price $3.75 

3 7x9 Assorte<l Glass Trays 

15x7 Glass Fixing Box 

1 Wood Negative Rack — capacity 25 

plates 
1 4\ix6V2 (or 4x5* Print Frame 

with glass 
1 copy "Here's the Answer." 

Bargain Package No. 4 Price $1.35 

3 bottles Dry Mucilage (in strips) 
gummed both sides. A handy ad- 
hesive. 

3 copies Photo Miniature. (We send 
you a list. You select them.) 

1 ca.rton of Clover Leaf Thumb Tacks 
and Thumb Tack Hangers. 

Bargain Package No. 5 Price $1.35 

1 doz. Dixon Retouching Pencils 
Choice of 2H-3H or HB (or as- 
sorted) 
1 Negative Drying Rack 
1 32-oz. Glass Mortar & Pestle 
1 Folding Dark Room Lamp 



Clear Transparent Celluloid, about 
the thickness of a blotter. Bargain 
prices. 

20 X 48 per sheet 60c 
20 X 36 per sheet 50c 



UNUSUAL DLSCOUNT! 

Roll film in popular sizes, fresh ma- 
terial. To reduce our stock before 
inventory, we offer a limited supply. 
The discount and brand of film will 
make you sit up and take notice! 

Write for details at once. 



ANSCO UNIVERSAL STAND 
(for the home portrait operator) 

Bargain Price $17.50 

20 X 24 STEEL TRAY 

Bargain at $6.00 

Portrait Film Kits to use film in 
plate holders. 

8x10 61/2x81/2 41/4x61/2 
While they last ... 10c each 

Wood Plate Kits 

6 1/2 X8I/2 to 5x7 
8x10 to 61/2 X8V2 
8x10 to 5x7 
While they last ... 15c each 

Dixon Retouching Pencils 
H— 2H— 3H— HB 

Per dozen $0.72 (may be assorted) 

Per dozen $6.95 (may be assorted) 

Brenkert Mazda Spotlight 

With 400-watt lamp. Has a heavy, 

substantial ba,se, anrl can not be upset. 

Bargain Price $22.50 

Perkins Automatic Arc Lamp 

Bargain Price $55.00 






PAGE 29 



ii'r 



.^. .. .J«... .. ^. . ..^. ...?=,.. ..g«,.«^^FEND^^».»i*.-.«4-...«=^-...«^-. ..<»§... .=^...^. 



New Heights! 

IN 

Panchromatic 
Photography 

Reached by DEFENDER FILM 

Greater speed to begin with . . . far 
better results at the end. Elimination 
of retouching drudgery to a marked 
degree. Proved ability to transmit, in 
a sequence of perfect tone gradations, 
the relative values of colors as the eye 
actually sees them. 

T h a t's why the estimation of 

DEFENDER PANCHROMATIC FILM 

has risen so rapidly in the field of com- 
mercial photography and in the studios 
of portrait artists. 



Company^ Inc. 

T Rochester, N. Y. I 





Preserve the 
Detail of 
Highlights 



In portraiture there is no highlight so strong 
but that the ground glass will show it in- 
terwoven with minute shadows. These shad- 
ows produce the brilHance and roundness 
and texture ot skin or white drapery that 
make the highlights interesting. 

Halation, caused by the spreading of re- 
flected light from the under side of the 
emulsion support, is practically eliminated 
in film. That's why Eastman Portrait Film 
negatives preserve the detail of highlights as 
no other negative-making material can. 

Eastman Portrait Film, Pa7' Speed, Super 
Speed and Panchromatic, at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Satisfaction At Tour Fingertips 

Your portraits are judged by the prints you 
deliver and there is no finer print quality 
than that secured in Vita\'a Athena Papers. 
Among its eighteen brands one finds a 
complete range of surface textures, from 
smooth semi-matte to rough, with and with- 
out lustre. There are also the distinctive 
Silk, Linen and Old Master surfaces, and 
white, cream white, ivory and buiT stocks — 
eighteen brands of quality papers for fine 
portrait prints. Ask for the Vitava Booklet. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All dealers' 



Lrr 



r-" 



T« FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 

No 2 



V^OLUME VI 



FEBRUARY, 1930 




SHADOWS AND HIGHLIGHTS 
/iy J. JurJrs 






B 19 1930 






Published by HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue. San Francisco 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 




By 
Courtesy 

of the 

Universal 

Pictures 

Corporation 



All livho have 
tried Agfa have 
found it good 

Portrait photographers have 
grown to recognize Agfa as 
being a particularly fine film 
for portraiture. All who have 
tried it have found it good — 



living up to all the assertions 
made about it, and giving 
negatives of the highest qual- 
ity with a uniform certainty in 
manipulation. 




PORTRAIT 
FILM 



AGFA A:WSC0 corporation, RIXGHA31TON, :W. \\ 

Page tv:o 



'T' FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 
by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



FEBRUARY, 1930 



No. 2 




IN THE PROFESSION 

Hemet 

This month our 
subject takes us to the 
San Jacinto Valley to 
the interesting town 
of Hemet, located 89 
miles (in the sub- 
,,,, , , urbs) southeast of 

nf virii-s- Los Angeles. 

Paul Frill Ic Cogley is located in 
Hemet, though a native of Shenan- 
doah, Iowa. His father was a dentist. 
!Most dentists these days have a 
hobby, either detective stories or card 
tricks, but Dentist Cogley was inter- 
ested in photography. His mother was 
a daughter of Representative Frink of 
Iowa and was a skilled artist. It is 
only natural, then, that the boy shovdd 
acquire a desire to make pictures. 

His father died when the bov was 
only five, and he was raised by his 
mother and grandfather, and enjoyed 
the benefits of ideal surroundings. 
Outside of school hours, he obtained 
a position in a local studio and soon 
did his own finishing as well as to 
make a set of community views that 
went over big. 

On leaving high school, he went to 
Kansas City, Missouri, and found a 
position ;n the Bauer and Coffee 



Studio, where he stayed five j^ears. 
From there, he w^nt to the Schultz 
Studio in St. Joseph, and then to 
the Wood Studio in Chicago. Com- 
ing to California, he took over the 
management of the Vreeland Studio 
in El Centro where he remained four 
years. The San Diego Vreeland stu- 
dio was his next move till June, 
1929, when he opened his own studio 
in Hemet. 

He is married and has a boy of 1 1 
and a girl of 7. At every opportunity 
the family goes to the San Jacinto 
Mountains, where he finds time to 
indulge in his hobby of sketching and 
painting. He belongs to the Lions 
Club and Chamber of Commerce, as 
well as the Photographers Associa- 
tion of America and the Photograph- 
ers Association of the Orange Belt. 

Call on him when you can, to dis- 
cuss art, business or an outing to the 
mountains and you'll find him a regu- 
lar fellow. 



Give us, O give us the man who 
sings at his work! Be his occupation 
what it may, he is equal to any of 
those who follow the same pursuit in 
silent sullenness. He will do more in 
the same time — he will do it better — 
he will persevere longer. One is 
scarcely sensible to fatigue while he 
marches to music. The verv stars are 
said to make harmony as they revolve 
in their spheres. — Carlyle. 



Page three 




THE LATEST IN FLASH LAMPS 

Ingento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp 

(Patent Applied for) 
SAFE — POSITIVE IGNITION 
Guaranteed in Every Way 

The Ingento Sure-Shot 

Flash Lamp is the most 

' perfect de\-ice of its kind 

ever produced. It was 

designed by a flash light 

expert to combine safety 

uith positive firing. It does both. 

The safetj' latch holds the firing 

trigger in place securely until 

it is released by an antinous or 

wire release which raises the 

latch. It cannot be released by 

jarring or vibration. 

The positive ignition is se- 
cured by means of three spark- 
ing metals or flints which throw 
a large flame into the powder. 
In addition to the above, a quiet 
primer cartridge similar to that 
employed in shot guns may be 
used. Either will ignite the pow- 
der — with both ends you are 
The Ingento Sure- doubly sure. All mechanical parts 
Shot makes a safe are protected from the flash. 
hand lamp. This outfit is sturdily built and 

will give long service. 
The Ingento Sure- 
Shot Flash Lamps" 
in addition to be- 
ing hand lamps, 
can be placed on 
stands or hung 
from the ceiling! 
and can be con- 
nected with a du- 
plex release for 
simultaneous fir- 
ing. By using a 
long release it is' 
p:ssible to set off, 
the flash at any, 
distance up to ten 
feet. 

The handle can be 
slipped off quickly 
and the pan placeci 
in the ordinary 
flash bag, thus 
eliminating a 1 1 
heavy electric 
wiring. 

^^'e gu a r a n 1 1 el 
this lamp to give 
you 100% satis 
faction in every 

way. Try the Ingento Sure-shot. If you don't agree 
that it is all we claim for it, send it back and your 
money will he cheerfully refunded. 

PRI CES 
No. 5 Ineento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 5" pan, 

each - $4.oO 

No. 10 Ing-ento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 10" 

pan. each 6.0<) 

No. IS Injrento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 18" 

pan, each , 7.50 

Sparklinc; Metals for above, each TO 

Primers for above per 100 1.00 

(Primers can be shipped by express 
or freight only) 
No. Nickel Plated 6 ft. folding stand, each-.-.S-SO 
12-ft. Dual Relea.se for operating two Ingento 

Sure-Shot Lamps simultaneously, each 4.50 

Manufactured and Guaranteed by 

BURKE & JAMES, INC. 




From the Melting Pot 

to your Bank Account 

ALBO 

gets all the silver from your 

Hypo Solution 
THE IDEAL PRECIPITANT 

— Clean, odorless, speedy 
Complete recovery 

$3.00 for 5 Lb. Can 

Full directions enclosed 
Prepared by 

Wildberg Bros. Smelting 
& Refining Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Who will buy all the recovered 
silver at highest market price 

Distributed by 

HIRSCH & KAYE 




The 



Hawkeye 



Reminder 



A turn of the knob sets dial for the 
e.xact number of minutes you want 
prints or negatives to wash. Save 
your time and energy. A good, de- 
pendable clock. 



:'. W. Madison St. 



Chicago, 111. 



Price $7.50 



Pagie four 



C THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

PHOTR) GRAPHS 



But Do Your Photographs 
Have Life? 

AT some time or other, you 
will be asked to make pictures 
intended to give publicity to 
a subject. It is most important that 
publicity pictures have life and indi- 
cate that the scene is accessible. Too 
many pictures are really studies in 
still life, and while beautiful to be- 
hold, fail to create the desire to visit. 

Is your picture intended for a tour- 
ist agency .■* The scene may be a 
beautiful beach, but unless you show 
it being enjoyed by people, it may 
just as well be the beach of an un- 
inhabited island in another part of the 
world. Is the scene a grove of big 
trees, such as we have only in Cali- 
fornia? Then don't merely show 
trees. Show people in the picture to 
indicate that they are accessible. If 
possible, show people in appropriate 
attire. 

Is the scene a charming mountain 
valley such as people like to see ? 
Put people into the picture, and create 
the appearance of enjoyment of the 
scene. Otherwise, your picture will 
have no personal appeal, for most 
likely the scene will register as one 
that requires an Indian guide, a pack 
team, and lots of effort to enjoy. 

A picture of El Capitan or Half 
Dome, in winter, without people will 
almost create a negative attitude be- 
cause of the thought of cold. But 
show a lot of people enjoying winter 
sports and you create the desire to 
oarticipate. 

We think photographers have been 
too much inclined to be governed by 
the sunlight, losing sight of the object 
of the picture. 

A railroad folder shows a view of 



the Ferry Building in San Francisco 
and mentions that more people pass 
through it daily than any similar 
building. But does the picture sup- 
port the statement? Indeed not! 
The picture was made at 2 p.m., a 
very quiet time, from an adjoining 
roof, and less than 25 people can be 
seen, and the Ferry Building actually 
looks deserted. To support the state- 
ment, another picture, taken from 
Market Street at 12:15 Saturday 
noon, showing the parade of com- 
muters, would be more convincing. 

If called to make pictures of a real 
estate project, don't indulge in land- 
scapes. Most likely, your picture will 
be without signs of life except a sales- 
man's car, with no customers or pros- 
pects in sight. Show people. Show 
activity. If possible, show buildings 
or street activity. No one will buy 
if the place seems dead. 

These suggestions do not apply to 
all pictures, of course, but keep this 
in mind — find out what the pictures 
are intended for and produce them, 
even if at the expense of superior 
lighting. 



Defender Canvas 

Velour Black Canvas is the latest 
product of the Defender Photo Sup- 
ply Co. It is a real canvas, with rich, 
silky, lustrous surface, suitable for 
projection from average negatives. 
Excellent for coloring. 

For the time being, it will be sup- 
plied only in 44 inch rolls, in multi- 
ples of 5 feet in length, minimum size 
5 feet. 

The price is $1.50 a lineal or run- 
ning foot. 

Order your trial roll now, from 
HiRSCH & Kaye. 



Page five 



{ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-\)ert) 



Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

K'33 -• Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address Dept. No. S 



Ike G. 



evaerl Uompan 
423-439 W. 55th St. 

Chicago, III. 
41:5-421 N. State Street 



V of A 



merica, inc. 
New York City 

Toronto, Ont. 
:547-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH 3C KAYE, 

San Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Depnidahle Alei cluittdise Loiv Prices 






i THt FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 ] 



We appreeiat© t]he§©="= 

1 have received all goods in first 
class condition and we are greatly 
pleased with them, especially the 
Pako printer. I thought that I had a 
printer of my own that worked about 
as good as any on the market, but I 
have to hand it to the Pako printer 
that it is a "humdinger." 

I want to thank you for your ex- 
tension of my account — -and the many 
kind courtesies of your salesman, 
wishing you the Season's Greetings. 



Thank you for prompt attention to 
my many small needs since locating 
here, and wishing all a prosperous and 
happy New Year, I enclose check to 
balance mv account. 



May I tender you my best wishes 
for the Holidays just past and more 
particularly for the New Year just 
ahead. 

I wish to thank you for your kind 
interest in my business relations with 
you. I assure you that there is no 
concern with which I deal that I have 
any more cordial feelings. 



Everything O.K. Just haven't 
been in the market for anything. 

It's 22 years since I have had the 
pleasure of visiting the "Hirsch and 
Kaye" store — Good luck to you for 
another year. 



I have been very well satisfied with 
all our business dealings and hope 
this year will be a bigger and better 
business for us both. After New Year 
I hope to call at the plant and look 
over some of the new machinery and 
stock. 



One-Sixth of Our Silver 
Comes From Scrap 

Scrap film from Hollj'wood moves 
to silver refineries by the car-load. 
Water used in washing down walls 
and woodwork in factories, sweepings 
from floors, yield up their treasure. 

Silver recovered from waste annu- 
ally totals 10,000,000 ounces, worth 
$5,000,000. That is 18% of our 
total production. Methods of recov- 
ering waste keep improving, and pho- 
tographers who merely pour their old 
hypo down the sewer pipe are throw- 
ing away just so much money. 

One studio in Hollywood enjoys a 
revenue of $6,000 a month from hypo 
solutions and silver recovered from 
discarded film. The possibilities in 
3'our studio are relatively as good. 
Order a can of Albo today. 



HOW MANY DO YOU RECALL? 

We quote from the S. F. Chronicle, 

issue of Jan. 4, 1905, — 

The Convention of the Photog- 
raphers' Association of California 
closed with a banquet, at which L. D. 
Hicks, F. A. Webster, O. H. Boye, 
Louis T h o r s, D. F. MuUender, 
Thomas P. Andrews, Jacob Fouzer, 
S. E. Goodall, John Guerin, Lawrence 
Terkelson and T. H. Wilton respond- 
ed to toasts. 



First want to thank you for the 
wonderful workmanship on enlarge- 
ments. I have been in business for 
many years and this is the best out- 
side work 1 have ever had done. For- 
tunate for your firm to have such a 
high class man with you in this 
branch. 



Page seven 



"SUCCESSES PILE UP' 



Picturing with 

Special Brands for Special Work, 

with emulsions made and tested 

in Hammer laboratories, 

is bringing to the studio 

better results and more money 

with less labor. 



Make negatives 

that not only have detail 

but have a roundness of tone values 

in the highHghts and in the shadows, 

necessary for the better print. 




^M^i'iiVfij'.^diB 



RES. TRADE MARK 



Write for portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



Ohio Ave. k Miami St. 
St. Louis 



159 West 22nd St. 
New York Citv 



Charcoal Black 

^A^ UNUSUAL PAPER FOR PROJECTION PRINTING 

DESIGNED 

For those ivho wish their prints to command attention and produce 

neii' business 
Grade "A" Thin Parchment— Grade "B" Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury Vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc lamps. 

Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount ol 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Paae eight 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 



BUSINESS IS GOOD 

but we must go after it 

An Editorial by George W. Harris 

Chairman of the Advcrtisinp Committee, The P. A. of A. 

THIS year, 1930, marks the golden anniversary of the photographic 
profession, and it has occurred to me that, due to the recent stock market 
losses, our plans for great expansions during this year should be recorded 
and broadcast. 

Personally I have felt, ever since this so-called crash, that it would have 
little effect upon our business, especially if we keep our heads up, and avoid 
becoming nervous over an exaggerated happening. We know that the number 
oi people, mostly inexperienced, who sustained heavy losses, is estimated 
at about j/^ of 1 per cent of the population. 

It is nothing! 

A drop in the bucket, especially when we consider our great resources. 

President Hoover, acting as a sound business man, took quick action, 
and the results have proved that his plan was a sound one. 

The conferences of business heads which he has held in Washington have 
brought these executive brains in harmony. Thev have set in motion the 
many wheels of continued prosperity. 

I know that the members of the association will join with me in expressing 
the sincere belief that business in the Ignited States 

— is sound. 

Buying power is high. 

Business is good ; but, 

— we must go after it. 



'Splain It to Me, 

PEPSODENT, first national ad- 
-^ vertiser to use the radio every day, 
took over the "Amos 'n Andy" broad- 
cast in the fall; paid some $750,000 a 
year for the service. Of this amount 
"Amos 'n Andy," in private life 
Charles J. Correll and Freeman F. 
Cosden, are said to receive about one- 
fourth. 

The company sought to change the 
"Amos 'n Andy" broadcast from ten 
to six o'clock central time, and did so 
for a short while. Rut immediately 
protests began to pour in. One hun- 
dred thousand letters, telegrams and 
telephone calls were received within 
a week ; mid-western merchants com- 
plained that their trade was being 
ruined because customers had to hurrv 



Andy, 'Splain It! 

home to listen to the radio; employers 
protested that clerks and stenograph- 
ers sneaked home early; dealers wired 
that they would no longer handle Pep- 
sodent ; citizens wrote and wired that 
they had thrown their tubes of Pepso- 
dent into the sink ; newspapers printed 
protest ballots. In the end, the fans 
won ; since November 25 "Amos 'n 
Andy" have been on the air twice 
nightly, at 7 o'clock eastern time and 
10:30 central time, 4 and 8:30 p.m. 
Pacific time. 



The explanation, Amos, is quite 
simple. Give the people what they 
want, not what you want *-.() give 

them. 



Page ninf 




"For fifty years 

Vve used Mdllinckrodt chemicdls. 

They re fine, trustoorthy friends." 



Write for your 

copy of our 

Handbook 

"Chemistry of 

Photography'' 




"Physically and Chemically Perfected" 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since ],S(;7 

ST. LOUIS MONTREAL PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



P/inr trn 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 ] 




Things you should 
^ know--" 



To Photograph Objects Under 
Glass- — If it is desii'ed to show the 
glass cover, give about one-fourth of 
the whole exposure to the object with 
the whole exposure to the object with 
the glass in position ; then remove the 
glass, and complete the exposure. 

V. 
To Blacken It ood. — Use: 

Borax 62.5 g 1 oz. 

Glycerine 62.5 ccm 1 oz. 

Shellac 125 g 2 oz. 

Water 1000 ccm 16 oz. 

Boil until completely dissolved and 
add water to make up the original 
bulk, then add nigrosine WS, 125 g. 
or 2 oz., stir until thoroughly dis- 
solved, and paint the wood two or 
three times. This is not as satisfac- 
tory as the following, in which the 
aniline black is chemicallv formed in 
the wood : 

Potassium bichromate 70 g 538 gr. 
Cupric chloride 70 g 538 gr. 

Hot water 1000 ccm 16 oz. 

The wood should be freed from 

grease, then painted with this solution 

and allowed to dry well, then painted 

with : 

Aniline hydrochloride 140 g 2^4 oz. 
Water 1000 ccm 16 oz. 

Allow to dry, wipe off any vellow 
powder that forms, and repaint with 
these solutions until black enough. 
As a rule, two coats are sufficient, as 
the color deepens in a day or two. 
Then rub wqW with boile<l linseed 
oil and leave to drv. 



Photographing i\Iachinery — Bright 
parts may be dulled by painting over 
with a thin cream of white lead and 
turpentine, darkened by the admixture 
of lampblack to give a grey. Fre- 
quentlv, dabbing the surfaces with a 
lump of puttv will be sufficient. 

V. 
To Photograph JMe/norial Stones and 

Brasses. — These often present consid- 
erable trouble, but if the surfaces of 
the stones are swept clean and strong 
side lighting used, the lettering and 
carvings will be thrown up into better 
relief. Wetting the stone frequently 
brings out indistinct lettering. In the 
case of brasses, rubbing with whiting, 
avoiding any deposit in the letters, is 
useful, as is also side lighting. Rub- 
bings, obtained by placing a sheet of 
paper over the brasses and rubbing 
with a soft pencil or charcoal, may 
also be used. 

■■■■ 
To Photograph Coins. — These may 
be smoked with burning magnesium 
ribbon, which leaves a delicate white 
film on their surfaces. Side lighting 
is preferable, so as to throw the fig- 
ures, etc., into relief. An impression 
may be taken in fine plaster of Paris, 
and this photographed. Or the coins 
may be placed on a fine white calen- 
dered card, slightly dampened, with a 
backing of blotting or other soft paper 
and passed through a copying or other 
press. This gives us an intaglio of 
the coin, which, if lighted with a 
strong light from the bottom of the 
design, will when viewed in usual 
manner give the impression of the 
relief of the original. 



Pag/c eleven 



! AT LAST/ a Peifecl Mailer 

I WE SELL 

I IheNeivIngenfa 

I Photo Mailer 




MADE IN THE FOLLOWING 
POPULAR SIZES 

No. 2.... 51/2 X 7% 

No. 3..... 6%x 814 

No. 4 71/2 X 91/2 

*No. 5 8% X 101/0 

*No. 6 1014 X 128/8 

*No. 7 121^ X 141/0 

*No. 8 101/^ X 15 

No. 9 61,4 X 914 

*No. 10 71/4x11% 

*No. 11 .•-... 81/2X 111/2 

*No. 12 13 X 171/2 

No. 14 16 X2014 

Packed in cartons containing- 50 



The New INGENTO Photo Mailer 

Has the only double seal feature of string fastener 
and gummed flap, making it possible to mail photos 
to foreign countries or send them by first-class mail 
when privacy or additional safety is desired. 

The INGENTO is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking pho- 
tographs, drawinjfs, sketches or any other valuable matter 
when this mailer is used, as they are perfectly preserved by 
the double corrugated board v.'hich covers the photograph or 
drawing both front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. The vari- 
ous sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popular 
up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios throughout 
the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now made 
81/^ X 11% inches. It will accommodate photographs 8x10 
or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with super- 
strength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large prints, 
folders, enlargements and drawings. 

Manufactured by 

BURKE & JAMES, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carried in Stork by HIRSCH Z5 KAYE 

SIZES for any need PRICES none can meet! 

Prompt Shipments 



and Cut Films. 



Stop Waste. Save Time, Money, Solutions. 
For best results install a 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFIT 

AMATEUR FINISHING OUT- Two Sizes Commercial Outfits for Plates 

FIT for Roll Film and Circuit Work Made of the 

FINEST 
PORCELAIN 
ENAMEL 

THE BEST BY 
TEST 

ALL WATER- 
JACKETED OUT- 
FITS have washing 
space with circulat- 
ing water around 
both inner tanks for 
temperature regula- 
tion. 

COMPLETE 

COMPACT 

ECONOMICAL 

Light in weight. 

Easily handled and 

cleaned. Durable, 

and Efficient. 





Sizes No. 1 accommodates both 5x7 
and 8x10 Portrait Hangers. Size No. 2 
is built for 5x7's only. 

White Enameled Fixing Baths 



Made in 2 sizes. 
5x12x42" hold 10 gallons 
8x12x42" hold 17 gallons 
Both blue and white tanks. 



Avoid Spurious 
Tanks. Name ''Ster- 
ling" on Ever}' 
Tank. 




STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 

"Pioneer Tank Builders," Beaver Falls, Pa. 



12x16x5' 
18x24x6' 



Stock; Sizes 

16x20x6" 
20x24x6" 



10x12x5" 
18x22x5" 
20x30x6" 



Page livi'l-ve 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



Duncan G. Blakiston 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed in Oil, 

Water Color, Black and White Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 420 - - Phone Prospect 476 



ARIZONA STUDIO wants a 
strictly high class kodak fin- 
isher, one who can assist with 
other photo work preferred. 
PeiTnanent position and splen- 
did opportunities to right man. 

C. H. S. B., 
c/o "The Focus." 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 
LOUISE C. BESTLER 



5703 College Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIF. 



Ever-Ready Service 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures and Photo- 
graphic prints — artistically done in real oils. 

Negative Retouching — Etching 

We are ecjuipped to print your miniatures 
from your I'egatives or copy from photo 
graphs. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention 

Rae Britton 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Graystone 7912 1285 Geary St. 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

:i916 STEINER STREET 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Need Lamps? 

Most likely you do. 

All sizes and styles for 

home, ofRce, or studio. 

Can be ordered 

from 



HIRSCH & KAYE 




For Best 

Retouching, Etching 

Prompt Service 

Send Your Negatives to 

E. K. HALVERSON 

469 Fell Street 

San Francisco 

Hemlock 4638 California 



PUTZ-POMADE 

An unexcelled reducer, applied 

with a cloth or a tuft of 

cotton. Skilled negative 

workers will not be 

Without it. 

Per tin, 25 cents 



Page thirteen 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 




No. 602 

Silver, Stippled and Toned 

10x13 only 

$3.75 each 



No. 307 

Silver and Polychrome 

or 

Platinum and Polychrome 

4% or 7x9% 

$1.65 each 



Quality FBAMES! 



Here are a few of the styles we offer. Notice the attractive prices. 
Other styles are shown in catalogue sent on request. 

Order today 

from HIRSCH & KAYE 




No. 203 

Silver and Dark Brown 

or 

Platinum, Stippled 

4%x6% or 7x9% 

$1.35 each 



No. 425 

Platinum, toned with Blue 

7x9% only 

$2.50 each 



Pa//i' fourteen 



<;^ 



{ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 



:: LISTED at the SERVICE DESK :: 



Are you looking fo'- a Studio Location? Is your Studio for Salef Are you seeking 

competent help? ALL of these problems are ansivered in these columns. IVe 

ha-ve insufficient space to list all the Studios offered for sale, and for the 

same reason are unable to give complete descriptions. If interested, 

get in touch luith the Hirsch k Kaye Seriice Desk. We'll be 

delighted to assist you. There is no charge for listing 

your business for sale in The Focus. 



Studios 



Anaheim Box 2247, 

Hollywood Box 2248, 

Los Angeles Box 2211, 

Madera Box 2228, 

Miranda Box 2250, 

Monterey Box 2242, 

Oakland Box 2143, 

Oakland Box 2260, 

Pismo Beach Box 2232, 

Pomona Box 2224, 

Redding Box 2258, 

Ashland Box 2089, 

Baker Box 2087, 

Colville Box 2254, 

Concrete Box 2123, 

Olympia Box 2210, 

McGili Box 2095, 

Salt Lake City Box 2230, 

Ai 

Morenci, Ariz. Box 2255, 



are available in these locations: 

California 

The Focus Richmond Box 2226, 

The Focus Salinas Box 2215, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2235, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2251, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2231, 

The Focus San Francisco Box 2256, 

The Focus San Jose Box 2222, 

The Focus Santa Cruz Boz 2249, 

The Focus Santa Paula Box 2164, 

The Focus Selma Box 2243, 

The Focus 

Oregon 

The Focus Bend Box 2209, 

The Focus Freewater Box 2097, 

Washington 

The Focus Snohomish Box 2086, 

The Focus Seattle Box 2137, 

The Focus 

Nevada 

The Focus Renu Box 2125, 

Utah 

The Focus 

izona — New Mexico 

The Focus La Cruces, N.M..... Box 2217, 



The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 
The Focus 



The Focus 
The Focus 



The Focus 
The Focus 



The Focus 



The focus 



INFORMATION WANTED 



Information wanted at SERVICE DESK 

about 

P. Hanlon, formerly, Corning, Calif. 
C. J. Briggs, formerly, San Francisco. 

G. McDonald, formerly, Stockton. 



Gustav Davis, formerly, San Francisco. 



H. M. Collett, formerly, Eugene, Ore. 
Gail Wellington, formerly, Reno, Nev. 
P. J. Standar, formerly, Dunsmuir, Calif. 
Mrs. S. Denton, formerly, Oakland, Calif. 
C. R. Mandeville, formerly, San Francisco 

and Hollywood. 
Arthur Howell, formerly, Eureka. 



Page fifteen 



.<ii 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 




W. S. Valentine of Redding has 
found another outlet for his inex- 
haustible energy. This time it is a 
steam laundr}^! We hope that he 
will "clean up" in all his enterprises 
as well as he should in the latest one. 

Mr. Valentine recently visited San 
Francisco for the purpose of purchas- 
ing modern equipment for his laundry. 

Burt Hodson of Sacramento has 
coined a new name for the profession, 
"Cameracurist." Accurate work is 
characteristic of a camera worker, al- 
though at times it is merciful to soften 
the blows nature hands some of us. 

Henry G. De Roos^ formerly a 
photo supply dealer in San Francisco, 
was a recent visitor. After leaving 
here, he went to Los Angeles to sell 
real estate, but now he's in oil. 

It doesn't seem many years ago that 
Thomas Shoob opened a modest stu- 
dio at Turlock. His principal assets 
were good health, industry and the 
determination to succeed. He did. 
Now he has taken over the Broden 
Studio at Modesto. Also he operates 
a modern dairy farm near Turlock. 

These thoughts were prompted by 



a visit from his son, who, in looks at 
least, is a chip of the old block. He 
has taken up studio work, and if he 
inherits the grit and the will to suc- 
ceed his father, he should go far. 

A Shakespearean performance, an 
art exhibit or a symphony may be 
relied upon as lodestones to draw Mr. 
and Mrs. Holmboe of Roseville to 
San Francisco. 

They were visitors to this city the 
last week of the year, and returned 
to Roseville for a New Year's Eve at 
their own fireside. 

W. Frank Goodner of Reno was 
in the city for several days. He 
reported extensive alterations in his 
studio, especially the camera room 
which has been enlarged. Inciden- 
tally, we learned that he is becoming 
a billiard expert, perfecting his game 
of 3-pocket and the more difficult 
games. How about a photographers' 
billiard tournament? 

The Packard Studio, formerh' 
located on Market Street, near 
Fourth, is now located at 179 O'Far- 
rell Street between Powell and Ma- 
son, San Francisco. 



Paffe sixteen 



[ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 



Spoxagel (S: Her?^iax obtained 
some unusual publicity when they 
made a large photograph of Norma 
Talmadge for the Granada Theatre in 
San Francisco. The picture was col- 
ored and attractively mounted on 
silver background, and displayed in 
the lobby of the theatre, and they en- 
joyed further publicity by having the 
picture mentioned in the theatre pro- 
gram. 

For several years, M. C. Voorheis 
of San Jose was afflicted with a ca- 
tarrhal growth that impaired his hear- 
ing. This Christmas season he worked 
hard and for long hours, but instead 
of a breakdown, his hearing suddenly 
improved, till now it is normal. He 
gives hard work full credit for his 
recovery, and feels that the last sea- 
son was the very best he ever had. 

"It's an ill wind that blows no 
one good." A^Iore truth than poetry, 
according to Louis Heilbrox of 
Fresno. During the recent storm 
that swept the state, several inches of 
snow fell in Fresno. Can you imagine 
it We can't, either. But it hap- 
pened, nevertheless, and everyone 
"broke out" a kodak to record the 
scene for posterity. All this occurred 
on Sunday, and bv noon it was im- 
possible to purchase a kodak film in 
town of the three most popular sizes. 
On the day following. Parsons t!^' 
Heilbron exceeding the largest run in 
the history of their plant by nearly 
300 rolls. "Maybe the Pako Rocker 
and the Hi-Gloss Dryer didn't do 
their stufi," savs Heilbron. 



W. F. Hexry of Vallejo has a new 
Chrysler 70 sedan that "knocks your 
eye out." One of those kind a fellow 
buys when dreams come true. 
..< 

Guy Lykixs of Eureka, Decker 
of Petaluma, Banbrock of Auburn, 
Dempster of Sacramento, Staples 
of Chico and Sackrider of Marys- 
ville were recent visitors in our store. 
These visitors from our out-of-town 
customers please us a great deal. 

Border tinted amateur prints are 
catching the public eye, as evidenced 
by recent sales of the Vakagraph 
Border Printers. During the past 
week, we have made deliveries of this 
machine to Fraxk Webb of Hanford, 
W. H. Melliar of Santa Cruz and 
P.ARSONs & Heilbrox of Fresno. If 
you are not familiar with border tint- 
ing printers, write in for a circular. 

Mrs. Paul De G.astox, charming 
wife of the talented photographer of 
Honolulu, was a recent visitor in San 
Francisco. Sometime late this spring, 
the De Gastons plan a leisurely 
around-the-world trip, taking several 
years to complete. From their many 
San Francisco friends "Aloha." 

Mr. Latzex, formerly with the 
Hollywood Studio, Oakland, is now 
with the Colenar Studio as camera- 
man. 

Not every photographer can boast 
of a private lake in the Sierras, but 
N. E. JoHXsox of Carson City, Ne- 
vada, has set the style. His lake, 
recently purchased, cov'ers 50 acres, in 
a region where hunting and fishing 
are plentiful. Sounds like a good 
place to hold a P. I. P. A. Convention. 



^ 



Paffe se-venleen 





The Veirito om yoeir Eelairgeir— 

JN OBJECTIVE AS OBEDIENT AS COLORS JXD BRUSH 
IN JN ARTISTS HAND 

N ENLARGING as in making neg-atives, the Verito diffused 
focus f4 breathes a softness of exceptional beauty that 
enhances the finished print with a dehghtful and indi- 
vidual quality of richness — it makes enlargements of 
sharp negatives with an unlimited variety of unique and 
artistic diffused focus effects, that saves much of the 
retouching process. 

The Verito is made in mounting's and foci to fit the 5x7 
EASTMAN AUTO-FOCUS ENLARGER — it can be used inter- 
changeably with the regular anastigmat lens at will. — Send your 
present Kodak anastigmat on your Auto-focus Enlarger to us thru 
your dealer and we will make a Verito that will interchange with it. 

Of course, the Verito can be used on all other enlarging ma- 
chines too, and will accommodate the regular foci as listed in the 
catalog. 

Price of special Verito f4 in barrel 
M ith iris diaphragm to fit 5 x 7 Eastman 
Auto-focus Enlarger $42.50 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL CO. 

872 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, New York 



giJ^ 

Pa^e eighteen 



Have Your Customers 

ENTER THE NATION-WIDE CONTEST! 




$20,000 



>^9?^'*% 




'On O? 



IN PRIZES TO 444 PRIZE WINNERS FOR 

AMERICA'S LOVELIEST MOTHER 

and MOST ATTRACTIVE CHILD 

Awards and Fame for Winners 

K(-membtfr there are two identical lists of prizes — one for lovely mothers, the other for 
attractive children. They mav enter either, or both, at no cost or obligation. Read 
the simple rules ; see how easy it is to w'in. 

liver\ print will receive equal consideration — those from the smallest towns as well as 
those from the largest cities. Photographic skill is not a factor — only the charm of the 
si'.bject. But each entr\' must be the work of a professional photographer. 

Opportunity — your opportunity — beckons! For besides (he liberal cash awards, news- 
papers and magazines \vill carry the winning photographs . The \vinners and photo- 
graphs will become famous overnight. 

The Judges 

FANNIE HURST, brilliant short story writer and novelist, author of "Humoresque," 
"Mannequin," "Lummox," and the recent best seller, "A President is Born." 
MARY ROBERTS RINEHART, famous for her mystery tales, humorous stories and 
plays. Among her best known works are "The Bat," "The Man in Lower Ten," and 
the delightful "Tish" stories. 

CHARLES AYLETT, President, Photographers' Association of America — Interna- 
tional — which is this year celebrating its Golden Anniversary. 



CONTEST RULES 



1. The contest is oi^en to any resident of 
the United States or Canada, except persons 
or meinbers of the families of persons con- 
nected in any way with the photographic 
industry. 

-. Any photograph talven by a professional 
photographer, after February 20th, 1930, 
shall be eligible for competition. An entrant 
may submit as many of such photographs a.s 
desire<.l. 

'.\, Each entry must be accompanied by an 
entry blank, jjroperly filled in. If more than 
one jirint is submitted by an entrant, each 
))rint must be accompanied by a separate entry 
blank. Entry blanks may be obtained from 
a local ijhotographer, or from Contest Depart- 
ment, Photographers' Association of America, 
2258 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

4. Combination or group pictures of mother 
and children shall not be eligible for either 
contest. Each entry must be a single figure, 
either mother or child. 

3. Photographs of mothers may only be 
entered by the subject herself, or with her 
written consent ; photographs of children may 



only be entered by parents or guardians, or 
with their written consent. 

6. Each prize-winning photograph becomes 
the property of the Photographers' Association 
of America, whose right to the use thereof for 
advertising, publicity and exhibition purposes 
is acknowledged by the entrant. All other 
l)rints will be returned if so requested on 
entry blank. 

7. Any one entrant may receive only one 
l)rize. National prize winners are not eligible 
for sectional comi)etition. 

8. Size, style or (juality of photograph shall 
rot be .given consideration by the judges. 
Awards shall be made solely on the appro- 
priateness of the subjects as "the loveliest 
mother" or "the most attractive child." 

9. In the event of a tie, for any award, 
each tying contestant shall receive the full 
amount of that prize. The decisions of the 
judges shall be final. 

10. All entries must be mailed to the 
Contest department. Photographers' Associa- 
tion of America, 2258 Euclid Avenue, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and must be postmarked not later 
than midnight. May 10th, 193 0. 



IF YOU are not a member of the Photographer.s' Association of America, 
write to the Association Office, 2258 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, Ohio, for details. 



Page tiincteen 



-Sffli 




I THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

Plenty of it, quickly available 
Low-priced - and how! 



Turn on the Sunlight 
any Time you want it! 

On dark days and at night — turn 
on the sunlight! Switch on FOTO- 
LIGHT'S brilliant light and take 
pictures of family events, parties, 
dances and the children at play! 
Also industrial scenes. 



The remarkable new 500-watt FOTOLITE PHrP^ 

provides as much light power as the average 
1000-watt lamp. 

No. 10 (for 1000-watt bulb). Corn- 
See the new FOTOLITE No. 15 — with its plete with carrying case (with- 

newly designed reflector and new chemically OUt bulb) $19.00 

treated reflector finish. It is second only to 

the famous FOTOLITE No. 10 (1000-watt No. 15 (for 500-watt bulb). Com- 

lamp) and No. 15, when used with No. 10, plete with carrying- cases (with- 

provides a light which — for steadiriess and OUt bulb) $16.00 

power — is ideal for every interior shot. 

Carrying Case for No. 10 or No. 

They are so easy to use. Can be carried ]^5 Reflector $2.50 

anywhere in a room and plugged in on any 

electric light socket — ready for use in an Carrying Case for No. 10 Or No. 

instant. 15 Stand 50c 

Now in stock at HIRSCH & KAYE Diffusers for either style— each, $1.00 

When Retouching use A. W. Faber's 





THE FINEST PENCIL MADE 

17 degrees of hardness 6 degrees for positive 1 degree sepia 

WRITE US YOUR NEEDS OR TELL OUR SALESMEN 



Pa(/e tixienly 



s 



i: THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

Bargains for the Photographer 



No. 123 Photo Mailers 4V2 x 7 

51/2x11% 

61/2x13% 

71/2 xl5% 

131/4x171/2 

12 xl8 

1214x16% 

121/2x141/2 



No. 


234 


No. 


240 


No. 


246 


No. 


162 


No. 


160 


No. 


157 


No. 


154 


2 ] 


Bam 


10 




39 




4 




6 




1 




1 





Special price per hundred .$1.00 

" 2.00 

2.50 

" 3.30 

" 5.20 

" 5.00 

" 4.80 

" 4.50 



TISSUE 

2 Bands No. 145 Grey Green 



1 
10 

1 
2 

S 



No. 149 Dark Red 

No. 150 Ruby Brown 

No. 169 Van Dyke Brown 

No. 168 Ink Pot 

No. 90 Single Transfer 



CARBON 

No. 95 Chocolate Red 
No. 103 Warm Black 
No. 105 Sepia 
No. Ill Cool Sepia 
No. 113 Portrait Brown 
No. 139 Rose Pink 
No. 140 Bottle Green 

Offered at 33-1/3% from standard list. 
(12 rolls, 40%. May be assorted.) 

SCREENS 
To reduce a surplus stock to normal, we offer subject to prior 
sale, the following- motion picture screens: 



2 Type D Bead Screens 


15 X 20 


list 


price 


$10.00 each 


2 " E 


36 X 48 




" 


22.50 " 


1 « E 


39 X 52 




" 


25.00 " 


3 " D 


39 X 52 




" 


27.50 " 


8 #1 Eastman folding- " 


30 X 40 






25.00 " 


3 #2 


39 X 52 




" 


35.00 " 



These are new screens and special prices will be withdrawn 
as soon as surplus is sold. Write for Barg-ain Prices! 

INTERESTING BOOKS 

''Roentgen Interpretation" $3.00 list price 

"Systematic Dev. of X-Ray Plates and Films" 2.00 " 

"U. S. Army X-Ray Manual" 4.50 " 

"X-Ray Technique" by Hirsch 10.00 " 

"Interpretation of Dental and Maxillary Roentgenograms" , 2.75 " " 

"Dental Radiography" by Raper 7.75 " " 

"X-Rays and Crystal Structure" by Bragg 4.00 " " 

"Essentials of Medical Electricity" 3.00 " " 

"Manual of X-Ray Technique" by Chri.stie , 3.25 " 

"Electro Radiographic Diagnosis," by Rayer 3.75 " " 

"Practical Electro-Therapeutics & X-Ray Therapy" by Martin 4.00 " 



WHILE THEY LAST— LESS 



50^ 



/o 



FROM ABOVE PRICES 



%^ 

Page tixicnty-one 



1930 Sprieg Styles 



Her© i§ a iood style to 




THE KENMOEE 

An inslip style — good weight stocks — both cover and insert are finished 
with a modernistic crystal pattern in harmony with the embossed and 
tinted design. Color is the new soft toned French drab. The arched 
opening is off the beaten path — the supporting (underlay) insert adds 
strength. 

Notice these prices — 

For sizes 3x4 3^2x5 4x6 

Price per 100 ^6.50 ^7.00 and ^8.50 

Many studios will make use of it as their popidar priced style for babies, 
children, Confirmation and Communion work — for school work it will 
be a leader. 

Samples of all three sizes for fifteen cents. 
This is a style needed on your sales counter 
for spring business. 

SAMPLE OFFER SS-12 



TAPEELL» LOOMIS & CO. 



(Eastman Kodak Company) 



Chicago, Illinois 



The Leading Card Novelty House of America 



^2s 

Pa^e tiuenty-ttvo 



^^ 



i 




"JERRIJ'S" 


CORNER 


f>^ mmsELF 



Last month the printer got my page 
all balled up. Maybe thats what he 
thought of my idea about inventory. 

If it happens again, I'll get me a 
new second hand typewriter and do 
my page myself. 

I been reading a book called 
a strange interlude. I don't know just 
what its all about but I think its 
about saying one thing when you 
really mean something else. 

Its a good thing for all of us that 
that idea dont work out in business. 

Just suppose you should do that 
when you write letters. Let's see 
how it would work out. 

A man has an old lens he wants to 
get rid of. He already has a good 
paper weight so he gets an idea. This 
is what he thinks 

I bought that hunk of glass 14 
years ago from a kidnaper. I paid 
him $8.00 for it, but it never was any 
good. Maybe I can get the stock 
house to give me something for it. 
If there boobs enough to fall for it 
thats there business. Besides, they 
don't want to loose a customer. 

And he writes this 

Gents — I have a 8 inch Bohonk 
rapid railroad lens Fll that I bought 
from Shears Sawbuck Co. lately. Now 



I aint got no use for it and I will 
sell it to you for $20.00 cash. Its 
the best lens I ever had and I think 
Mr. Eastman made it himself. I took 
a prize for some pictures I made. 
Send the check to me and I'll send 
you the lens when I get through 
with it. 

Just imagine any photographer do- 
ing anything like that? Oh, Deah ! 

I think, tho, the shipping clerk 
knows something about the book be- 
cause he's been calling me maple 
syrup. 

I asked him why, and he said that 
was the original sap. 

Ma3^be he's right. What I should 
have done before I went to work in 
a photo supply store, was to learn 
how to make mattresses. Then, I'd 
have something soft to fall back on. 

One swallow dont make a summer, 
but there days it might make a corpse. 

Im supposed to write this stuff on 
my own time and its awful hard to 
forget my responsibility to the firm. 

I just happened to think — even 
when I die I cant get away from it. 
If I go to heaven. 111 meet all the 
H & K customers again. And if I 
dont go there — well, I may meet that 
old H (S: K gang of mine. 

Jerry. 



Pat/e twenty-three 



I THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 



(\xOR the quickest, cleanest and 
^ most economical way to make 
cloth backed prints use Holliston 
Photo Cloth. It is self-adhesive and 
comes ready for use in 7 standard 
sizes. 

No shopping for suitable muslin- 
no cutting — no paste — no waste. 
Saves valuable time and gives bet- 
ter results. Every sheet of Holliston 
Photo Cloth is unconditionally 
guaranteed. 




PRINT ROLLERS 




PROFESSIONAL 
Styles A and B 




nickel plated, and the handles are so construct- 
ed as to allow the heaviest and most even 
pressure with the least expenditure of muscu- 
lar effort. 

The outside diameter of the rollers measures 
iy> inches. The rubber is of the best quality, 
one eighth of an inch thick. They are made in 
two styles, A and B. 

The roller in style A has a hardwood center, 
tvhile the roller in style B has a steel center. 

Note: — When not otherwise specified, we 
will ship style A. 

PRICES Style A 

( length of roller) Wood Center 

6 in $3.10 

S in 3..S5 

10 in 3.60 



Style B 

Steel Center 

$4.00 

4.15 

4.45 



Rubber Squeegees 




Suitable for many photographic purposes 
for which a roller may be suggested. 

Light weight Professional 

4% inch $0.70 

« " 75 

.s " .75 $1.30 

10 " 1.00 1.75 

C' " 1.15 1.90 

TRAY SIPHON 

THE Eastman Automatic Tray Siphon is a 
useful device with which you can turn 
ordinary trays into efficient washin.c: machines. 




Prints are thorou.L':hly washed in water that 
is being con.stantly changed and the oi^eration 
retiuires very little time. 

$6.00 



Pax/ie twenty-four . 



£ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

Usefml Preparations 



Nostane 

Nostane is a positive and sure preven- 
tive of all stains from any chemicals used 
in photography. It is a perfect substi- 
tute for rubber gloves without any of their 
inconveniences. This article is in the 
form of a paste, perfectly odorless, and 
when applied to the hands, renders them 
proof against discoloration and poison- 
ings. Affects neither hands, plates, or 
papers. 

Price, per box $0.25 



Rubiline 

A VARNISH FOR MAKING 
RUBY GLASS 

This preparation will be found practical 
and economical for making ruby glass, 
coating dark room windows and incandes- 
cent electric lamps. It can be applied with 
a brush, without heat. It gives a safer 
light, with more illumination, than the 
ordinary ruby glass as it absorbs com- 
pletely all of the actinic rays to which dry 
plates are sensitive. 

4-ounce bottle $0.75 



Alvord's Opaque 

Excellent for Film and Plates 

This Opaque is in the paste form, it 
lays smooth and thin and does not sour, 
mold, crack or stick to the print. Can be 
applied with pen or brush. Will wash off 
leaving no stain. 

Photographers and photo-engravers will 
find it a very satisfactory blocking medi- 
um. Put up in screw top jars. 
PRICES 

No. 0—1 oz $0.25 

No.l— 21/2 ozs 50 

No. 2—7 ozs 1.00 

No. 3—20 ozs 2.00 

No. 10—1 Gallon, $15.00 



Black Matt Varnish 

This is an optical black varnish for 
coating the inside of cameras, plate hold- 
ers, lens tubes or any place where light 
should not be reflected. It dries quickly 
to a perfect dull, smooth, ebony black 
finish that will not rub off. When applied 
to a smooth surface of metal or wood and 
allowed to dry and afterward rubbed with 
a cloth and bee's wax, a beautiful, rich 
finish is obtained — suitable for picture 
frames, etc. 

It is ever ready and should be on hand 
at all times. 

Price per bottle $0.55 



Gihon Opaque 

A dry opaque in cake form, to be 
applied with a brush. Will stick as ap- 
plied. Excellent for blocking out on 
negatives. 

Per Cake 50c 



Ground Glass 
Substitute 

(Hance's) 

Hance's Ground Glass Substitute, when 
flowed over plain glass produces a surface 
in every way equal to the finest ground 
glass. The grain is extremely fine, and 
the result is a perfect matt surface. This 
solution is used by the leading profes- 
sional photographers and photo-engravers 
throughout the country. 



Price, 4-oz. bottle. 



$0.50 



Hammer Retouching 
Varnish 

It is always ready for use. 

It dries instantly. 

Gives an ideal tooth for the pencil. 

Will hold all the lead you may wish 
to put on. 

It will not permit paper to stick to the 
negative. 

It does not change the color of the 
negative. 

It is flowed over the negative; not 
rubbed on. 

It may be flowed over the negative after 
retouching, without injuring the retouch- 
ing. 

The glass side of the negatve may also 
be coated with the varnish and lead ap- 
plied, where an extra amount of retouch- 
ing is desired. 

16-oz. bottle $0.60 

(Cannot be mailed) 



Johnson Retouching 
Dope 

Imported because of its superior qual- 
ity. Applied locally with cotton. Should 
be in your studio. 

1 oz $0.30 

2 oz. 50 



i 



Page tiventy-five 



£ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 
Supreme for portraiture and child photography The all-round high speed anastigmat 




VITAX 



Portrait f3.8 

IA/^ HILE the Vitax is not a general-purpose 
"" studio lens like the Series II, it is par- 
ticularly suited to portrait work and child 
photography. 

In making child portraits and baby pictures 
speed of lens is all-important. The Vitax works 
at fy.S — a practical speed for a portrait lens. 
With this rapidity, snapshot exposures in the 
studio are entirely jsractical. 

Vitax portraits, particularly large heads and 
busts, have a rounded, standing-out quality that is 
life-like and beautiful. This effect is due in part to 
the improved Petzval formula of the lens. Of value, 
too, to the portrait photographer is the diffusing 
device which gives a slight softness when desired. 

If your light is poor, your negatives under- 
timed ; if you desire a nicer quality in your por- 
traits ; if you want certain success in photograph- 
ing the youngsters — consider the Vitax Portrait 
f3.8. 



VELOSTIG- 
MAT 

Series II f4.5 



UOR general-purpose work in the studio, for 
•*■ use in home portraiture, for speed work 
with the reflecting type of camera, the Series 
II is pre-eminent. 

Studio workers find that its perfect!}' flat 
field helps in photographing standing figures 
and groups. Home portrait photographers like 
its compact construction. However, for por- 
trait work, where the best perspective is de- 
sired, it would be advisable to select a Series 
II Velostigmat a size larger than the plate for 
which it is listed. 

The Series II is very versatile, and its use- 
fulness is not confined to portrait work alone. 
It is admirable for copying and enlarging, 
and is even suitable for commercial and view 
work when slightly stopped down. 

A diffusing device on the five largest sizes adds 
to its usefulness. 



No. 



Focus 



10 in. 
13;/2 in. 
16 in. 
20 in. 



I I 

Lens I Speed ! 
Diain. ( j 

/3.8 ■ 



31/4 in. 
4^-^ in. 
4^ in. 



/3.8 
/3.S 
/5 



In 
Barrel 

$105.00 
135.00 
185.00 
200.00 



In_ 
Studio 
Shutter 

$110.00 
140.00 
186.00 
201.00 



VITAX EXTENSION LENS 

10 be used with 16" focus, increasing focus to 20", 

$57.50 



No. 


1 
1 
1 Size 


1 1 1 
Equiv. 1 In 1 In 
Focus IBarrel | Studio 

1' 1 1- 

Syi in. $34.00i 

5 in. 37.501 

6 in. 42.001 | 
714 in. 52.50 

m in. 67.50 

9'.^ in.il05.00 
12 in.|140. 00 $146,501 
14 in. 185.00 190.001 
16 in. 240.00 245.00 
19'^ in. 365.00 366.00 


In 1 In 
Betax lOptimo 



1 
2 

3 
3A 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


2'4x 3'4 
3'.4x 4^4 
1 4 X 5 
15x7 
15x8 

1 6;^x m 

1 8 X 10 
!10 X 12 
11 X 14 
il4 X 17 


$36.00 
41.50 $46.50 
49.001 51.00 
58.501 63.50 
76.501 81.00 

111.001 115.50 

149.00 



The most popular and practical soft-focus lens 




There is a Verito to fit practically every 
studio, view, Graflex, hand and movie 
camera. 



VERITO 

Diffused Focus f4 



A PIONEER among soft focus lenses, the 
Verito has contributed greatly to the ad- 
vancement of pictorial phase of photography. 
Any degree of softness or sharpness may be 
obtained by simply changing the diaphragm. 
Definition is not destroyed, but pleasingly 
subdued so that retouching is practically 
eliminated. The long-focus rear element may 
be used alone. In enlarging, too, it gives 
beautiful results. The Verito improves on 
acquaintance, and the longes you use it, the 
more delighted vou will be with its infinite 
possibilities. 





1 1 1 

1 1 Equiv. 1 Rear 


1 
In 


In 


In 


No. 


Size 1 Focus 1 Focus 


Barrel 

$22.50 


Studio 


Betax 


*A 


3 'AX 414 


5 in. 


10 in. 


$24.50 


*15 


4 X 5 


Syi in. 


14 in. 


25.00 




29.00 


1 


iUx 414 


614 in. 


10 in. 


28.50 




34.50 





4x5 


7 '4 in. 


11 in. 


32.50 




41.50 


3 


5x7 


834 in. 


14 in. 


42.50 




53.00 


4 


6V^x VA 


ll'/i in. 


20 in. 


60.00 


$65.00 




5 


8 X 10 


l^Vz in. 


24 in. 


85.00 


90.00 




7 


111 x 14 


18 in. 


30 in. 


110.00 


111.00 





*Size A and B, /6 — all others/4. 

Veritos of special speed 5" focus or shorter 

in Barrel $25.00 

CINE VERITO — Information on request. 

VERITO EXTENSION LENS 

10 be used with 18- focus, increasing focus to 22'4", 

$20.00 

These lenses can be purchased from 
HIRSCH & KAYE with privilege of trial 
and time payments. 



Paffe twenty-six 



I THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 J 



M 



April^May Bmsmess 



OTHER'S DAY can be made a "Second Christmas" in the 
amount of business done, if every photog-rapher will push the sale 
of photog"raphs for this purpose. There is certainly no possible 
gift that is more suitable for Mother than a portrait of her son 
or her daughter. And the market for photographs for this purpose 
is great; for millions, every year, buy gifts for their mothers on 
that day. 

If these millions are to buy photographs rather than flov^^ers, 
or candy, or some other article that is extensively advertised and 
sold them by every merchant in every part of the country, they 
must be sold photographs. The photographers all over the country 
must tell the public that "Photographs Live Forever," that there 
is "one gift that is never duplicated." Once the people are thor- 
oughly sold on this idea, they will buy photographs for Mother's 
Day; but they must be sold first. 



What does a Scotchman do with his old razor blades? 
Why, he uses them — of course. He buys a 

GOEMTZ CUTTEB '^ 

and with his old blades, he has 

" The Sharpest Knife in the World " 

Style No. 4 




Satin Gold Finish, $0.75 

Style No. 5 
Polished Gold Finish, with 
Engine Turned Design, $1.00 



Style No. 1 

Brushed Brass Finish, $0.25 

Style No. 2 

Black Nickel Finish, $0.50 

With Gold Plated Slides 

Style No. 3 
Polished Nickel Finish $0.75 

Style No. 6 
Silver Oxidized Finish, with 
Engine Turned Design, $1.00 

BE SCOTCH — and order your Goertz Cutter today 
from HIRSCH & KAYE 



Page fwenty-se-veii 



A new contact 

and enlarging 

paper of rich 

iparmth and 

beauty 



INDIATONE 



I 



c4 



NEW paper which is a revela- 
tion in warmth. 
A slow enlarging medium just 

right for the fast projection 
equipment now used in so many 
studios, yet suitable also for contact 
printing by screening down the lights. 

Rich in quality, long in scale, wide 
in latitude, and beautiful in its dis- 
tinctly professional tones, Indiatone 
is a paper meeting a definite need. 

Supplied in Cyltex surface — White 
and Buff — at Enlarging Cyko prices. 
You will like it. 




^QFA ATISCO CORPORATION, BinQHAITlTON, H. ]]. 



Page tiventy-e'tc/lit 




AVacuiim 
Dispenser 

AliiM^sNy 



Glue 

Covers 

BrushOnly 



£ THE FOCUS for FEBRUARY, 1930 } 

SURESTICK 

The New Vacuum 
Dispenser 

A White 
Liquid Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready; sticks quickly; 
does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints; will not get stiff when ex- 
posed to air. 

Surestick Never Cracks Loose 

whether slip under, comer mounts, parch m;ent or tipped-on sheets. For gluing 
]»rints in albums, sealing backs of picture frames, plaque work — any place a 
high grade adhesive is required it is far superior. Only small amount required. 
A trial will convince you Surestick IS RIGHT. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint ii.5c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars— Half pint 50c Pint 8.5c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 

Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 




Midget Border Printer 

Here is the printer you ought 
to have. Supplied with choice 
of borders in one of three de- 
signs. Changes to other designs 
can be made quickly and con' 
veniently. Six sets of masks are 
available, one each for film sizes 
127, 120, 116, 122, and 118. 

Special masks are available for 
greeting card work, and plain 
white border can likewise be 
made. Well built, with all wires 
concealed. 300 watts illumina- 
tion, in addition to small pilot 
light. Permits making the border 
or print first, as preferred. Each 
mask is a complete unit and is 
easy to set for register. 

The entire machine is well 
made; finished in black, with 
nickeled metal parts. Just the 
printer for the small finisher, and 
a handy machine to have in the 
larger plant. 

Price of Midget Printer $60.00 

(Wilhout lV1:isks) 
SET OF MASKS, SIX SIZES, CHOICE OF THREE DESIGNS, PER SET ."SUO.OO 




Par/e twenty-nine 




4^ ^^ ^Kp 



From Shado^w to HigMiglit 

Quality Dominates in Projected Prints 
on 

VELOUK BLACK 



Velour Black has the ideal combination 
of speed and gradation to produce the 
technical qualities generally associated 
with contact prints. The fidelity to 
scale that particularly identifies prints 
projected on Velour Black, is made pos- 
sible by an emulsion which gives these 
papers an all-embracing latitude far 
beyond the range of ordinary photo- 
graphic papers. 

There are nineteen different surfaces for your 
selection. 



Evj 



DEFENDER PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY iNC 

ROCHESTEP^ . N .Y. 



r 



■M '0 

(^>^..§J:^...«=,....c«....c.....c=o...^...^.^^ENDER^.<-i..-.«^-...«i..-.«=^^ 
Paae thirty 





1 


■piil^l 




^■^^^W lUSHLii^^Hiiii'^^^^H 




w;; gsjjjj *, 


^^^■1 




^ 



/Vw/j /^r School JVork 

Uniformity is one of the essentials of school 
or college work — from brilliant negatives, 
brilliant, uniform prints that group together 
and look well because there is no variation 
in tone or quality. Vitava Athena C and E- 
smooth are the choice of many photogra- 
phers who speciaHze in school work. C is a 
white stock, E is a light buff, and both have 
the pleasing, smooth matte surface so desir- 
able for this class of work. 

Athena C and E prints will retain all the quality 
of your most brilliant negatives — will please your 
student patrons and bring them to you another year. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All dealers' 



Page tliirly-onc 




UPPER — Non-color-sensitive film 

LOWER— Eastman Process Panchromatic Film 

A group of magazine covers such as that shown in our 
illustrations is comparable with almost any commercial 
job which requires correct reproduction of color printing. 

Labels and packaged articles are becoming more and 
more colorful, and as shades of red or orange enter into 
almost all color schemes only a panchromatic emulsion 
will give a correct rendering. 

There is a wonderful satisfaction in delivering a diffi- 
cult piece of work knowing that you have nothing to 
excuse. Panchromatic Films, Process, Commercial and Por- 
trait, with Wratten Filters, permit one to secure any de- 
gree of color correction with as little or as much contrast 
as the subject demands. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

All dealers' 



r_ 



T« FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 



Volume VI 



MARCH, 1930 



No. 3 




John D. Jokes, Evening News-Index, Evanston, Illinois, made thh interior of Sheridan Theatre, 
Chicago. Made with IJl oz. A'ictor Flash Powder, Soft Grade, in a No. 2 Automatic Dependable 
Flashlamp. Cook Lens, 6^4 in. Stop between F.lt and F.16. 



Published by HIRSCH & KAYE 

239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Flemish-Golcl 



T 



oner 



A new means of enhancing 
the value of the Finished portrait 

T T T 

FEW can resist the appeal of gold tones. Even 
a very beautiful sepia suffers by comparison. 
Now delicate gold tones, the occasion of so 
much comment at exhibitions, are available to 
photographers through Flemish-Gold Toner at 
extremely low cost. 

A supremely simple toner which permits any 
variation of tone, with accurate duplication to 
meet the individual taste. 

In comparison with the hypo-alum hot-bath 
toner for sepias, the preparation and use of this 
new Flemish-Gold Toner for Agfa Ansco papers 
will seem like child's play, the process is so simple. 

The operation is not fussy or troublesome at 
any point, and the toning does not cut the print. 
Flemish-Gold Toner stands up well, and the large 
tube, costing only SI. 00, makes sufficient toner for 
several hundred prints. 




AGFA ANSCO OF BINGHAMTON, N. Y 

AGFA ANSCO LIMITED, 204 KING ST. EAST, TORONTO, ONT. 



Pcu/c iwo 



"T FOCUS 

Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 
by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



FEBRUARY, 1930 



No. 2 



IN THE PROFESSION 



During his forty-six 
years as a photographer 
in Placer, Nevada, El 
Dorado, Phimas and 

yl^H Sierra Counties, W. E. 
^H Banbrock, Auburn res- 
■ — ident, believes he has 

■'FU'c times traveled five times 

around tin- 

^i-orhi" around the world on 

foot, in stages, horse- 
back, driving a buckboard, and finally 
in his automobile. 

Coming to Auburn in 1882 as a 
youth of 19, after finishing his ap- 
prenticeship at Carson City, Nev., 
Banbrock found the county seat lack- 
ing sufficient business after a couple 
of days of effort, and moved to more 
thriving mining camps. 

He finished the year 1882 in Iowa 
Hill, then a thriving mining town, 
and the next year moved his opera- 
tions to Forest Hill, where many 
mines were operating. 

In a {^w years he came to Auburn, 
and established that city as a base for 
his travels over the five counties 
which he conducted despite the phys- 
ical handicap of losing a leg at the 
age of 14. Traveling on foot, horse- 
back and in an old horse-drawn buck- 
board, he became a familiar figure in 
the mining camps of those five coun- 
ties. 



Twenty years ago he purchased his 
first automobile, and in that time has 
driven about 15,000 miles a year on 
business trips in the five counties. 
With the 20,000 miles he traveled in 
the twenty-five years before he had 
an automobile, Banbrock believes he 
has gone the equivalent of five times 
around the earth in the five counties. 

For the past thirty-five years, since 
his marriage, Mrs. Banbrock has been 
affiliated with him in business. 

When Mr. Banbrock began pho- 
tography he used primitive methods, 
making his own plates and mixing his 
own chemicals. Today he uses the 
most modern equipment and methods 
and his studio shows that he is right 
up to the minute in his ideas. We 
believe he has made a record, both for 
travel and for length of residence in 
a locality. Ar there any readers who 
challenge his records? 



"P'olks travel mostly in two paths," 
said an old sage. Upon being ques- 
tioned further, he elucidated the re- 
mark by saying: "You can be so 
careful that you'll never owe anybody 
anything — nor ever have much. Or 
you can owe everybody something 
and never have anything. My idea is 
to take the middle path. Owe some 
money, but not too much. Folks 
always work better when they're pull- 
ing a nice size load. 



Page three 



{ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 





Glue 
Coucrs 
Brush Onjy 




SURESTICK 

The New Vacuum 
Dispenser 

A White 
Liquid Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready; sticks quickly; 
does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints; will not get stiff when ex- 
posed to air. 

Surestick Never Cracks Loose 

whether slip under, comer mounts, parchment or tipped-on sheets. For gluing 
prints in albums, sealing backs of picture frames, plaque work — any place a 
high grade adhesive is required it is far superior. Only small amount required. 
A trial will convince you Surestick IS RIGHT. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint 55c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars — Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 
Sold b:^ HIRSCH & KAYE 



BRUSHES 



Avoid pinholed negatives. Dust your plates and film when you load your holders. Use 
camel hair brushes for this purjwse. Bristle brushes are excellent for pasting-. Hirsch & Kaye 
carry these in stock. 




CAMEL HAIR 



Rubber Set 
$ .90 
1.25 
1.55 
2:15 
2.70 
3.40 
5.00 



1 

iVo 

2 

21/2 

3 

31/2 

4 



BRISTLE 
Tin Bound Rubber Set 



inch 



.18 
.25 
.30 
.35 



^ .45 

.65 

.85 

.95 

1.05 

1.30 

2.70 



Here's a Practical Tripod 



Often you have longed for a rigid 
tripod that could be set up quickly 
and adjusted to position with equal 
ease. We offer the H & K PRESS 
TRIPOD to meet these demands. 

The tripod is 32 inches overall when 



The 



closed, but opens to 58 inches, 
head is permanently attached. 
The locking device is fastened to the 
top of the lower or sliding leg, always 
within reach. Weight 3 lbs. 
H & K PRESS TRIPOD - $5:60 net 
Order one today. 



Page four 






[ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




DORETYPES 



A Doretype is a positive made from a 
negative by contact or projection. The 
process is like that of making sepia paper 
prints by bleaching and redeveloping. To 
make a first-class Doretype it is positively 
necessary to use a first-class negative. The 
negative should be balanced in light and 
shade, with sufficient contrast and half- 
tone, same as is required to make a good 
print. Expert Doretype makers prefer the 
Hammer Slow Plate, or Seed 23 or East- 
man 33. The two essentials to be considered 
are correct exposure and development, 
which means that the plate must be suffi- 
ciently exposed to insure detail in the 
shadows, while at the same time develop- 
ment should be retarded by a liberal 
amount of a saturated solution of bromide 
potassium to retain brilliancy. A full time 
positive, slowly developed, lays the foun- 
dation for a rich tone in after re-develop- 
ment. A positive suitable to hang in a 
window is altogether too strong for a 
Doretype; therefore, do not over-develop. 

Any good developer may be used if 
properly balanced. Some prefer Pyro, 
the same as used when developing a nega- 
tive with the exception of added bromide 
developer, thus doing away with any 
stain such as Pyro might leave. 

A Pyro formula can be used if a suffi- 
cient amount of bromide potassium is used 
to reduce the speed of the developer. 
There are two Pyro formulas in each box 
of plates, the one calling for three stock 
bottles, with instructions how to use same. 
The other is Pyro dry. Both are excellent 
negative formulas, and can be used with 
equally fine results for Doretypes by add- 
ing bromide potassium — say ten drops of 
a saturated solution to 16 ounces of de- 
veloper. 

After developing, fixing and washing, 
place the plate in the following bleacher 
solution: 



Tlhmgs YoM ShoeH 



STOCK SOLUTION "C" 

Water 8 ounces 

Red Prussiate Potash. Yi ounce 

Bromide Potass Yl ounce 

■ For use, take 1 ounce of water, 1 ounce 
of "C" stock solution, and 2 drops aqua 
ammonia. Continue to bleach until all 
blacks disappear; then wash and place in 
the following re-developer; 



STOCK SOLUTION "D" 

Water 10 ounces 

Soda Sulphide (not Sulphite) 2 ounces 

For use, take 1 ounce of water, Yl' 
ounce of stock solution "D." Give plenty 
of time to re-develop thoroughly. If the 
emulsion has become very soft, by reason 
of the action of the sulphide, the plate 
should be put through the usual harden- 
ing solution. 

If desired, the hardening solution can 
be used before re-developing. 

Tlie last important thing to complete a 
Doretype is the choosing of a suitable 
backing. Some of the finest portraits are 
backed with a light peach colored silk, 
thus adding to the face a flesh-tint, and 
at the same time the texture of the silk 
adds to the beauty of the draperies worn 
by day patrons. The silk must be in per- 
fect contact with the emulsion side of the 
plate, and should be cut one-sixteenth of 
an inch smaller than the plate all around; 
then bind the plate, silk and cover-glass 
together with lantern-slide tape. 

Landscapes and all out-of-doors scenery 
can be made very beautiful and attractive 
by the application of a high-grade light- 
gold coating powder. To apply this, mix 
with Lantern Slide Varnish, and flow on 
the emulsion side (if too thick to flow 
easily, add a little acetone) and then drain 
off the surplus into a dish, and lay the 
picture down flatly, with the gold-side up, 
until dry. 

You can obtain all the material you 
need for making Doretypes, from Hirsch 
& Kaye. Make up a few. They bring 
good prices and are very attractive for 
display in your studio. 



Page five 



£ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

Photographic Prints Executed in Oil, 

Water Color, Black and White Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 420 - - Phone Prospect 476 



SAVE TIME, WORRY, and MONEY 

By having your Quantity Printing done 
by a firm that specializes in 

QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

All sizes up to 11x14 

Minimum 100 from Negative 

Quick Service Work Guaranteed 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 

86 Third St. SAN FRANCISCO 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 

5703 College Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIF. 




Need Lamps? 

Most likely you do. 

All sizes and styles for 

home, office, or studio. 

Can be ordered 

from 



HIRSCH & KAYE 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

2916 STEINER STREET 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Ever-Ready Service 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures and Photo- 
graphic prints — artistically done in real oils. 

Negative Retouching — Etching 

We are equipped to print ycmr miniatures 
from your negatives or copy from photo- 
graphs. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attentiok 

RAE BRITTON 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Graystone 7912 1285 Geary St. 




Retouching 
Etching 



SPECIAL RATES 

for 
SCHOOL WORK 



ANNE BOSTON 



2341 Bay St., San Francisco 
WEst :{ft6;i 



QUANTITY PRINTS 
Special Discounts to the Trade 

ALTA STUDIOS, INC. 

1271 Mission St. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 9581 



m. 

Page six 



■f^ 



[ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



The Public Demands a 
Change 

HOMES, tractors and typewriters 
are sold in the belief that their 
owners will be satisfied with them for 
a long time. Automobiles, radios, 
and cameras are sold with the belief 
that the owners will soon want faster, 
better, more attractive models. In 
which group would you place the pic- 
tures you deliver to your customers? 

A story is told of a woman who 
had her wedding picture made by a 
photographer who also made her first 
picture before she went to school. 
The studio "property," backgrounds, 
bench and accessories were exactly 
the same in both pictures. The cam- 
era and lens were also the same. 
There were only two changes that 
she could see. Both the photographer 
and herself were older and the studio 
looked more run down, and the cur- 
tains and accessories were dirtier. 

Fortunately, the number of old 
time "gallerys" of this type is getting 
less. Many have been remodeled to 
the latest designs of practical usage 
and pleasing appearance. However, 
it is important that your technique 
and style of work also improve WMth 
time so that those pictures made five 
>ears ago will not seem so modern. 

In a recent interview, Charles F. 
Kettering, president of General Mo- 
tors Research Corporation, said : 
"Our chief job of research is to keep 
the customer reasonably dissatisfied 
with what he has." 



If You Are Interested in Better 
Negatives, Read This 

In some studios, certain operations 
are accepted as a part of the routine, 
a sort of necessary evil. Even though 
this condition creates expense, it is 
tolerated because it has always been 
the custom. 



It is now possible to greatly min- 
imize one condition that becomes most 
distressing at your busiest moments. 
There is little room in this issue for 
the details, but if you will ask us — 
"How can I reduce the cost of nega- 
tive making " we will submit the 
complete answer. 



Offer of Free Roll Film 
Cabinets 

If you sell roll film, you are wel- 
come to one of the film cabinets sent 
on request. The cabinet is really a 
silent salesman, and provides excellent 
storage facilities. 

This prompts us to remind you of 
the increased discount now quoted on 
roll film and film packs for resale 
purpose. Free signs are also avail- 
able, so decide now that you will sell 
roll film and film packs, and send 
vour orders to HiRSCH & Kaye. 



Pictures Wanted 

Have you a picture of a California 
scene of historical interest? Espe- 
cially those that recall the visit of an 
author or a famous person. If you 
have, get in touch with Californians, 
Inc., 703 Market Street, San Fran- 
cisco. 



Photo Holders Free 

If you can use a brass photo holder 
for your display, write to us for a 
pair of H (i' K Plate Holders. Made 
of satin finish brass, and imprinted 
with the slogan — "Photographs live 
forever." The supply is limited, but 
as long as the\' last, they will be sent 
to you with our compliments. 



No one ever got ahead by holding 
someone else back. 



Pa(/e sei'en 



{ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 

For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-^ert) 



Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

K'33 '' Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address Dept. No. 8 



c 



evaert L'ompanv oJ r 



Tiea, Inc. 



423-439 W. 55th St. 

Chicago* 111. 
413-4:J1 N. State Street 



New York City 

Toronto, Ont. 
347-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH SC KAYE, 

San Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Dependable Merchandise Low Prices 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 

Midget Border Printer 

Here is the printer you ought 
to have. Supplied with choice 
of borders in one of three dc 
signs. Changes to other designs 
can be made quickly and con- 
veniently. Six sets of masks are 
available, one each for film sizes 
127, 120, 116, 122, and 118. 

Special masks are available for 
greeting card work, and plain 
white border can likewise be 
made. Well built, with all wires 
concealed. 300 watts illumina- 
tion, in addition to small pilot 
light. Permits making the border 
or print first, as preferred. Each 
mask is a complete unit and is 
easy to set for register. 

The entire machine is well 
made; finished in black, with 
nickeled metal parts. Just the 
printer for the small finisher, and 
a handy machine to have in the 
larger plant. 

Price of Midget Printer $60.00 without Masks 

Terms if desired 
SET OF MASKS, SIX SIZES. CHOICE OF THREE DESIGNS, PER SET $:iO.«0 




JBoirder Prieteir 



(MODEL B) 

Eight sizes of borders furnished with 
large machine as follows: 127'120'1 16-1 18- 
101-122'124'130 and special sizes may also 
be added if you wish. Only one design of 
border to each set is supplied. 

Each print is numbered at the time that 
picture is printed and at a very small 
extra cost your name or other trade mark 
can be made to appear on the back of 
print with the order number. 

Each size mask is complete, and may be 
removed without disturbing its register 
when another size is to be printed. Chang- 
ing from one size to another is done in 
an instant. 

The platen and paper holding arrange- 
ment and lights are at all times under the 
operator's control at the handle. 

DESCRIPTION SENT ON REQUEST 

Price, Model B, $200 

[Terms if drsirfJ) 

NOW is the time to order 

from 

HIRSCH & KAYE 




VAKAGRAPH MODEL B 



Paf/r nine 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




"For fifty yedrs 

Tue used Mdllinckrodt chemicals. 

They're fine, trustiporthy friends/ 



Write for your 

copy of our 

Handbook 

"Chemistry of 

Photography'' 



«i ii 




"Physically and Chemically Perfected" 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since 1867 

ST. LOUIS MONTREAL PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



Paqe ien 




C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 

PAKO Mocker System 

The Pako Rocker System is a com- 
plete print handling system, starting 
with the acid short stop (check) 
bath and carrying through to the final 
draining of prints before they are 
dried. 

The Rocker System consists of the 
following: 

1 Motor equipped Rocker with Ad- 
justable Time Indicator. 

2 Moulded Rubber Trays. 
1 Wash Tray (Patent Outlet) 
4 Print Carriers 
1 Drain Stand 

A One Rubber Tray is used for the 
' Acid Short Stop Bath. The second 
is used in the Rocker for Hypo Bath. 
The Wash Tray has a patented outlet 
whicli drains off all the hypo-con- 
taminated water every three minutes. 
The 4 Print Carriers are used to 
carry the prints through the 4 steps 
of the system — Short Stop, Hypo, 
Wash and Drain. 
The whole process is extremely simple. One of the Print Carriers is in 
the Acid Short Stop Bath. Prints arc tossed into this Short Stop Bath as soon 
as developed. 

When a hundred or more prints have accumulated the Print Carrier is 
lifted by its handles and is transferred to the Hypo Tray in the Rocker. 

Another Print Carrier starts at the Short Stop Bath, while the first batch 
is Fixing in the motor driven Rocker. After sufficient time for fixation each 
loaded Print Carrier is moved forward another step — from the Hypo to the 
Wash Tray, from the Short Stop to the Hvpo, and another empty Print 
Carrier starts at the Short Stop. 

When thoroughly washed the prints, still in the Print Carrier, are drained 
in the Drain Stand and are then removed for drying and the Print Carrier 
returns to start its cycle from the Short Stop Bath. 

You can see at once that the only attention needed by the Rocker System 
is the movement of the Print Carriers between Steps in the process. Since it is 
about 20 seconds work to transfer a Print Carrier from Wash to Drain, or 
from Hypo to Wash, not more than five minutes per hour can be actually 
devoted to operating the PAKO Rocker System. 

PPvICE, PAKO Rocker System Complete with Motor $195 

1 Hvpo Tray 1 Time Indicator 

1 Short Stop Tray ] T^rain Stand 

1 Wash Tray (Pat. outlet) 4 Print Carriers 

A payment of $50 and $29 per month for 5 months will put this in your 
washroom. It will save the salarv of an assistant. 

Order Today from HIRSCH & KAYE 



Par/r eleven 



Wk 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



THE NEW VICTOR ELASH GUN 
Dependable. Safe. Convenient 



The Victor Flash Gun 
is a worthy companion 
for Victor Flash Powder. 
Like the famous powders 
for which it was de- 
signed, it is the outcome 
of long and painstaking 
experimentation. So 
many things had to be 
considered — dependability 
of firing, safety, ease of 
operation, convenience in 
shape and use, swift 
loading and unloading 
features, lightness, bal- 
ance — and a dozen oth- 
ers. 

However, all these prob- 
lems are solved in the 
New Victor Flash Gun. 
It is truly the best flash 
lamp on the market. You 
have only to hold one in 
your hand to be assured 
of this. The balance, the 
simplicity, the beauty, 
perfection and strength 
of the instrument is im- 
mediately obvious. While 





it was especially built for 
the use of Victor Flash 
Powder and will un- 
doubtedly perform most 
favorably with this pow- 
der, it may still be used 
with other powders. It 
is the New lamp for all 
uses, for every photog- 
rapher. 

This new instrument 
offers you something 
entirely new and revo- 
lutionary in flash lamps, 
as the feature explana- 
tion below makes clear. 
But further, this gun 
offers you a guaranteed 
satisfaction. Because the 
gun is so completely 
suited to all your needs 
we are willing to send 
you one, through your 
dealer, for a free trial 
with the understanding 
that it may be returned 
at our expense if you do 
not find it to be every- 
thing you expect of a 
flash lamp. Get yours 
today. 

It means guaranteed serv- 
ice and satisfaction for 
you in 1930. 



Superior Features of Victor Flash Gun!! 

SURE FIRE — Removes all uncertainty as to SERVICEABLE — Entirely of non-rusting 

whether your powder charge will fire. metal, strongly built and excellently ma- 

SAFE — Has automatic action eliminating the chined. Good for many years of heavy usage, 

possibility of accidental firing, which is al- OPERATES IN WIND OR RAIN — Flash pan 

ways present with lamps which must be '^ drawn, giving closed sides and ends to 

"cocked" or "set." prevent spilling flash powder. Can be used 

r\Tjtr^i2- T /-w A rvixT/-. TT J 1. 1 -J t •" liigh wittd by covering top with thin tissue 

QUICK LOADING— Head breaks sideways by p^per held in place by rubber band around 

a twist of the hand allowing discharged ^jd^^ „f A,^„ i„ ^^j^ y,^. substituting 

primer to drop out. ^^^^^ p^p^^ f„,. ,^^ ^j^^^^ p^^ i^ ^^„. 

QUIET — The Victor Primers used in this lamp rusting and easy to clean. 

are noiseless. GOOD LOOKING— Nicely proportioned and 

EASY TO OPERATE — A squeeze of the hand furnished in handsome dull silvered finish, 

does the trick. The most natural firing ac- PRIMER MAGAZINE IN HANDLE— End 

tion ever incorporated in a flashlamp. ^"°^ P""^ "^ *" expose a primer magazine 

irtav TTi xrrwT T\ t i. j •<• -^ holding f2 primers in Model A lamp or S."> 

h!^Z?H ?1? M ^''^ '" ^"'"' f^u** u^ 'i '* P'""e'-« i" Model B lamp. Thus unnecessary 

wH«7^f ^ ?i f ^t''''".'"^ »f the hand or ^^ ^^^ry box of primers on average job and 

wrist to hold it up in firing position. i • • i i j -i 

^i, 11... IS pu's.i.uii. makes primers more quickly and easily ac- 

LIGHT WEIGHT — Only IT ounces and beau- cessible. Is insurance against being caught 

tifully balanced. Slips easily in coat pocket. without supply of primers. 

The Victor Flash Gim comes in two sizes 
and is priced at a very low figure. 
VICTOR FLASH GUN 

Length A — 10 inches long $10.75 

Length B — 18 inches long— with extra lO'flash pan 12.75 

VICTOR CENTER FIRE PRIMERS— per hundred 1.50 

Order Today from Hirsch & Kaye ! 



Fa(/e t<wel-ve 



$;i 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 ] 



Display Material 

BARGAIN PRICES 

1 17 VV m^^» DEVELOPING & PRINTING I 
I V AJ^JIH9 Daily Service 

Muslin Sign No. 2B — Price each ^0.75 

Printd in three colors, Paint Poster Process, size 12 in. x 61/2 ft. These 
signs are so designed that tiiey may be cut in half and each part used 
separately. 






//^.„-c^flsa'»^>^/ 



AND THE PICTURE 
IS YOURS FOREVER 



Side Piece No. 3B 

Size 28 in. x 28 in. 

24-pIy Mat Board. 

Four Colors. Price ^1.00 



mi&im&fcmmfAi&fm 



Side Piece No. 4B 

Size 28 in. x 28 in. 

24-pl>' Mat Board. 

Four Colors. Price ^1.00 



A LIMITED SUPPLY AT THESE PRICES! 



Now is the time to order 
from 

HIRSH & KAYE 



Paffe thirteen 



i THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 ] 




FRAMES 

Here are two 
popular styles for 
two pictures. 



Also available in 
many styles and 
sizes for single 
pictures. 



Big Profits 
Small Investment 



No. 300 

Silver and Black or Platinum and Brown 



4%x6% or 7x9% 

.00 each List 



Good Photographs help to sell 

Frames 



Good Frames help to sell 

Photographs 



In stock 
at 

HIRSCH 

& 

KAYE 

Write for 
frame catalogue 

Order Today ! 



ATTRACTIVE 
DISCOUNTS 
FOR RESALE 




No. 524 

Silver, Stippled or Gold, Stippled 

4%x6% or 7x9% 

$5.60 each List 



Pa{/e fourteen 



Fori 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 

For almost half a century 
Hammer made emulsions have found 
and are still finding a ready market, 
because — 

It's so easy to select a special brand 
for any picture you are called on to make,- 
It's so easy to make better photographs 
than the ones you thought were best. 

" PHOTOGRAPHS tell the story " 



REQ. TRADE MARK 

// rite for free Portfolio of Prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 

159 West 22nd St., Ohio Ave. c\^ Miami St. 

New York Citv Saint Louis 



An Unusual Paper designed for 
Projection Printing 

For those icho ivish their prints to command attention and produce 

new business 

Grade "A" Thin Parchment— Grade "B" Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HTRSCH & KAYE 



COOPER HEWITT LAMP 

( Mercury Vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc lamps. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Pac/e fifteeti 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




Harold A. Parker, Pasadena pho- 
tographer and art dealer, died Febru- 
ary 9 while playing golf. He was offi- 
cial photographer of the Rose Fete 
of Pasadena for years, and a popular 
citizen. His widow has our profound 
sympathy. 

Leonid Fixk, well known portrait 
photographer of Seattle, was a recent 
visitor. Some of Mr. Fink's recent 
work is of a decidedly original char- 
acter. 

je 

jVIortox & Co.^ San Francisco, re- 
cently had their telephone number 
changed and the announcement pre- 
pared by Mr. Morton was a clever 
bit of illustrated photography. The 
shadow of a view camera, ready for 
action, dominated a picture of their 
new switchboard, showing the four 
trunk lines and several locals, attend- 
ed by an operator. Congratulations 
on the originality and novelty of the 
idea. 

Border tinted amateur prints are 
catching the public eye, as evidenced 
by recent sales of the Vakagraph 
Border Printers. Recently we made 
deliveries of quite a few machines to 
photographers. If you are not famil- 
iar with border tinting printers, write 
for a circular. 

Miss Kathleen Dougan of 



Berkeley has gone to New York for 
a vacation, after a very busy season. 

G. M. Taylor of "Famous Photo- 
tographs of the Yukon," called on a 
visit and showed us a few of his pic- 
tures. The "spell of the Yukon" was 
felt for some time afterward. 

Mr. James Reedy of Pako fame 
was in California during February, 
on a business trip. Mrs. Reedy was 
with him. Mr. Reedy told us of new 
appliances to be made by Pako, de- 
tails of which will follow in a later 
issue. 

,^ 

Another factory representative who 
called was Mr. Cameron of Taprell 
Loomis, who told us of the rapidly 
increasing sales of their products. 
.^ 

Harold W. Benjamin, Oakland 
photographer, is again making good 
pictures. For a while he seemed to 
be up in the clouds, but the arrival 
of a baby girl early in February 
brought him back to earth. 

The Johnson Studio of San 
Francisco is now located at 1 1 59 
Market Street, after many years at 
Sixth and Market Streets. And so 
goes another landmark in the ex- 
panding down town district. 



Pa</e sixteen 



{ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 ] 



B' 



1886 



1930 



44 YEARS OF SERVICE 

to the 

PHOTOGRAPHIC PROFESSION 

in 

THE WESTERN COAST OF NORTH 

AND CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE 

PACIFIC ISLANDS 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

Your logical source of supply 



Putz Pomade 

Putz Pomade is a smooth working 
friction reducer. As a local reducer 
this preparation is without a peer. 
It is applied with a soft cloth or tuft 
of cotton. Since the action is purely 
mechanical it is entirely at the com- 
mand of the retoucher at all times. 

The use of Putz Pomade permits 
the operator to reduce any portion of 
the negative to just the exact 
degree desired. The preparation is 
so fine that it may be applied to the 
most delicate portion of the negative, 
and it ^vill never scratch. It reduces 
more evenly because of its smooth 
consistency ; moreover, it is indispen- 
sable for bringing up hair, draperies, 
and the light portions of the picture. 

Putz Pomade is supplied in con- 
venient tins. It never becomes caked, 
lasts longer than other similar prepa- 



•H 



rations, and does not leave the 
negative greasy. Photographers and 
others will be glad to know that this 
very popular reducing paste is now 
available in our stock. Mr. Beattie 
recommended the use of Putz Po- 
made, during his school of lighting. 

We offer the preparation in con- 
venient three ounce tins for 25 cents 
each. 



Monokrom Green Silk 

This is a new and attractive addi- 
tion to the Defender line of papers. 
Made in an artistic shade of green in 
Iris for contact printing and Velour 
Black for projection. Prices are the 
same as for other Monokrom papers. 

Order a dozen today and make a 
set of prints. Suitable for portraits 
and outdoor scenes. 

HiRscH & Kaye will supply you. 



Paffe seventeen 



I THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




These two reproductions are from photographs made with the 12" 
^ocus Series B Beach Multi'focal lens to illustrate the exceptional 
latitude in timing. In hoth cases the lighting; diaphragm aperture 
Ex. 11.7 (equivalent to f5.3), focus and position of camera were 
the same. The exposure given one as will be noted, was '/4 second 
while the other was given 16 seconds. 



UNAPPROACHABLE 

T TNHEARD latitude in timing with unbelievable speed 
^-^ — full definition with roundness — sharpness without 
harshness. Perfect perspective or drawing — depth of focus 
such as has never before accompanied speed — unique in 
quality — remarkable for copying and enlarging. It does 
everything better. The customer appreciates the difference. 

The Beach Multi'focal lens is now made in two Series, 
The Series A for softer effects and the Series B for 
sharper effects making it suitable for all round use. 

WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 

872 HUDSON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Paffe eighteen 



I THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



Technicolor Movies 

HTECHNl COLOR has been used 
-*■ withmorc or less success since 
1922. Because it costs more per foot 
than black-and-white films, producers 
formerly did not try it much. Last 
year the vogue of the experimental 
and obviously unperfected sound- 
device taught them that experiments 
could be profitable. Warner Broth- 
ers made the first all-Technicolor all- 
talking picture — On icith the Shoiv. 
Others followed. Technicolor, Inc. 
began to do a big business. 

Technicolor is the trade name of a 
process invented by Dr. Herbert 
Thomas Kalmus, onetime (1913-15) 
professor of electro-chemistry and 
metallurgy at Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, now president of a 
$35,000,000 corporation. Dr. Kalmus 
built his first camera ten years ago. 
It took 15 months to build and cost 
$120,000. Technicolor cameras are 
cheaper now, but there are not many 
of them available; a year ago there 
were only eight in the world. Techni- 
color, Inc. owns exclusive rights to its 
process — not the best process yet dis- 
covered for taking pictures in color, 
but the only one that has been made 
commercially practical. In the special 
camera which takes two negatives 
simultaneously the films coated with 
a tough gelatin emulsion pass through 
filters of red and green dyes. It has 
recently become possible by expert 
color planning of costumes, settings, 
to reproduce nearly perfectly all col- 
ors of the spectrum except yellow, 
which still gives trouble. Techni- 
color Inc. now manuftctures one cam- 
era per week, rents the cameras, 
cameramen and color experts to film 
companies, develops all Technicolor 
film in its own laboratories. (Time.) 



Women Hold the Purse 
Strings 

TTAVE you ever figured what pro- 
-*- -*■ portion of your sales were the 
direct result of feminine influence? 
We can answer the question for you, 
without your troubling to make an 
analysis. A recent national survey 
shows that 85% of all money is spent 
by women. Think back over your 
own experience during the past three 
months and see if this is not true. 

A wife brings in her unwilling hus- 
band to have his portrait taken, be- 
cause she says "he hasn't had a decent 
picture in ten years." Mother sees a 
group picture of Mrs. Jones and her 
children in your window and decides 
that she ought to have one of her own 
family. And so it goes. 

Man is a shy creature and shuns 
the photographer unless ]VIamma 
makes him go. Sometimes it is Daugh- 
ter or Sister or even Mother-in-law. 

The influence of woman can be 
capitalized by any alert photographer. 
Every satisfied feminine customer can 
pass along the good word to her circle 
of woman friends and the male mem- 
bers of her family. Focus on the 
ladies. It pavs. 



The happy man is he who is cheer- 
ful with moderate means ; the un- 
happy, he who is discontented in the 
midst of plenty. 

The best angle from which to 
approach any problem is the try angle. 



T^HIS the Age of Steel? of Elec- 
-*- tricity ? of Research? Nonsense. 
This is the Age of Indolence. Only a 
man lazy by inheritance, environment 
and training can fully enjoy the bene- 
fits of the time. We know. And now, 
thanks to a Swiss genius, one of our 
few remaining burdensome jobs — 
that of opening the garage doors — is 
eliminated. As soon as we get the 
aerial installed on the garage room 
and the necessary gadgets placed in 
the car we simply press a button and, 
presto! the doors open and we sail 
on in without even changing gears. 
Now for an automatic shoe lacer. 



Patje nineteen 



t THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



The Brunner Automatic 
Glossy Print Drier 




Designed to meet the requirements 
of tJic smaller photo finishers. 
Small in size, loiv in price, yet 
sturdily built of the same fine 
materials as the larger and more 
costly Brunner dryers. A machine 
that entirely eliminates the labor 
and expense of the present metliod 
of drying on squeegee tins. 



BRUNNER GLOSSY DRIER 

TABLE MODEL 




RUNNER automatic glossy dryers 
of very large capacity have been 
operating successfully for the 
past two years in the largest fin- 
ishing i^lants in the country. 
The success of these large ma- 
chines has created a demand 
among the smaller finishers for 

a small machine at a low price which we are 

now offering. 

Description and operation : 

Heavy flat chromium plates are mounted at 
two middle points to two continuous belts of 
steel roller chain, being mounted in such a 
way that when the chain makes curves at 
either end of the machine, the plates take the 
turn without bending. This belt of plates 
moves continuously from right to left of the 
machine and is actuated by a sturdy mechan- 
ism and two wringer rolls which also scjueegee 
the prints. As the plates move along the 
prints are dried by a heating unit (gas or 
electric) and when dry, the prints AUTOMAT- 
ICALLY SEPARATE from the plates and 
drop on the print pan under the machine from 
which they can quickly be removed. A sorting 
table can be placed aside the dryer and the 
prints sorted and checked as they are dried, 
thus saving time in this operation. This 
dryer will handle 700 amateur size prints per 
hour with ease. It is entirely automatic and 
requires no labor or attention other than lay- 
ing the wet prints on the machine and sorting 



them when dry. One person operating a 
Brunner dryer can turn out more work than 
two people drying prints in the old fashioned 
way with squeegee tins. 

Details of construction, etc. : 

This dryer measures 44 inches long, 30 
inches wide and 22 inches high. It can be 
placed in any plant on a small table, bench, 
etc., and occupies considerably less room than 
old fashioned drying outfits consisting of 
wringer table, drying cabinet stripping 
table, etc. 

Westinghouse motor, Boston reduction gear 
and ball bearings throughout provide a smooth 
running, silent mechanism that will operate 
for years without mechanical trouble. 

The frame is strongly made of heavy angle 
and channel iron rigidly bolted together. Steel 
roller chain used for plate conveyors and con- 
veyor drives. 

The Brunner dryer is shipped completely as- 
sembled in one crate and can be put into 
operation one hour after uncrating. 

Shipping weight, 250 pounds. 

Price $:ir>0.0(> F. O. B. factory 
Electric heat $25.00 additional 

When ordering state whether ALTERNATING 
or DIRECT current. 

Budget terms 
if wanted. 

Place your order today with 

HIRSCH & KAYE 

Your logical source of supply 



Page iiventy 



[ THE FOCUS for MARCH. 1930 } 



r 

U - 




^ 



IHE BRUNNER AUTOMATIC GLOSSY PRINT DRYER— JUNIOR MODEL 

JUNIOR MODEL 
1930 Junior Model 



WHILE the same in principle and 
construction to former models, 
it has been improved by the 
changes listed below and is so 
built that should greater ca- 
pacity be desired, a, section may easily 
be added at moderate cost and the 6- 
plate Junior Dryer converted into a 
10-plate dryer. 

Brunner Dryer.s are the only ones 
offered that have this very decided 
advantage. 

1930 IMPROVEMENTS 

Heavier plates, insuring still better 
drying. 

Ball bearing throughout — easier run- 
ning — longer life. 

New drive — Plates are pulled through 
the wringer instead of power wringer 
pushing them through. This new drive 
saves wear and tear on both plates 
and wringer. 

Heavier conveyor belt and simple ad- 
justment to keep it running true. 

Improved heating unit — Operates with 
a mimimum of gas. 

Improved plate washer. 

Print capacity, 6-plate dryer, about 

1200 per hour. 

Print capacity, 10-plate dryer, about 
1800 per hour. 



The Brunner Junior Dryer, because 
of its small size can be easily installed 
in any plant. Length 7 ft. Width 
2 ',2 ft. Occupies only 18 sq. ft. of 
floor space. 

1500 average size prints per hour. 

The Brunner Dryer — Junior Model — 
is shipped in one crate, completely 
a.ssembled, and can be put into opera- 
tion in one hour after uncrating. 

P R I C E S 
Junior model — 6 plates— $600.00 
Junior model— 10 plates— $875.00 

Extra section to convert 6-plate 
machine (1930 model) to a 10- 
plate machine .... $275.00 



BUDGET TERMS 
IF WANTED 

Order Today 

from 

Hirsch & Kaye 



Pa{;i' tiventy-one 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



// 



A Peppy'''' Spring Style 




THE MITZI 

This novelty easel is just the style to show right now — 
to "stir up" business — to keep the younger set inter- 
ested in photography. 

Bright — colorful — sophisticated. It meets today's re- 
quirements for a style off the beaten path. 

Color Grey and Neutral 

Size of openings . . 1-13/16x1^ and l-%x2-% 
Prices $3.20 and $3.90 per 100 

Samples of both sizes in two colors — 
four up-to-the-minute easels sent for 
10 cents postpaid. Ask for Sample 
Offer F-31. 

TAPRELL, LOOMIS & CO. 



(Eastman Kodak Company) 



Chicago, Illinois 



Page t'wenty-t'iuo 



{ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




" J E R R IJ 


S" 


CORNER 


by HimSELF 





Some day, while you're waiting for 
the negatives to come out of the 
tanks, try this little stunt, then pull 
it on your friends. 

Put down the number of your liv- 
ing brothers. ^Multiply by two. Add 
three. Multiply by five. Add the 
number of living sisters. Multiply 
bv ten. Add the number of dead 
brothers and take 150 from the 
answer. 

Now — the right figure in your 
answer will be the number of deaths, 
the middle figure the number of liv- 
ing sisters and the left hand number, 
the number of living brothers. How 
about it? 



Her lips quivered as they ap- 
proached mine. My whole frame 
trembled as I looked in her eyes. Her 
body shook with intensity as our lips 
met, and I could feel my chest heav- 
ing, my chin vibrating, and my body 
shuddering as I held her to me. 

The moral of all this: Never kiss 
them in a Ford with the motor going. 



The typewriter makes it easy to 
write, but it's just as hard to think 
as ever. 



I've never seen a cord of wood — 
I hope I never saw one ; 
Rut I can tell you — this is good — 
I'd rather see than saw one. 



He had choked her! 

She was dead. There could be no 
doubt about that. He had listened to 
her dying gasp. 

Now she was cold. Cold as the 
hand of death ! 

Yet in his anger he was not con- 
vinced. Furiously he kicked her. To 
his amazement she gasped, sputtered 
and began to hum softly. 

"Just a little patience is all it 
takes, dear," remarked his wife from 
the rear seat ! 



A sultan at odds with his harem 
Thought of a wav he could scare 'em : 
He caught him a mouse. 
Which he freed in the house, 
Thus started the first harum-scarum. 

Some of the new cars now have 
shatterproof glass. If they could only 
find a chatterproof glass there would 
be less back seat drivers. 



]VIy kid sister asked me . . "Jerry, 
when I grow up, will I have a mus- 
tache on my lip like daddy has?" 
and I says to her, "Pretty often, 
sister." 



When I go out for lunch I alwavs 
order Scotch asparagus. (No tips.) 



I've been bothered with corns 
lately, so I bought some of that corn 
syrup made bv that Don Amazo, what 
plays over the radio. I soaked my 
feet in it, but all it did was to draw 
flies. 

I'm regusted. 

Jerr^. 



Paf/r tivrnly-t/irec 



f THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



A Good Film Gathers Friends 




By Courtesy of the Universal Pictures Corporation 



yy/HEN any product is as 
promptly and generally a c - 
cepted as Agfa Portrait Film — with 
demand continuing its 
increase month by month 
— it is clear that users 

must find that product ""KlKAll 
particularly good. J^JIiiiTM 




vA 



Agfa Portrait Film has a qviality all 
its own. How fine that quality is has 
astonished many. How helpful it is 
in producing professional 
results, innumerable pho- 
tographers will tell you — 
for this film gathers friends 
wherever it is used. 



AGFA ANSCO CORPORATION, BINGHAMTON, N 

Page tiventy-four 



y. 



C THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 

A Sensational Discovery of Interest to All Photographers 



Smokeless - - No Cinders 
or Flying Sparks 

Instantaneous - - Clean 






''^essFiASH 






At last the perfect "smokeless" 
flash powder is here. NORWIL 
PRESS FLASH is the result of 
years of research and experi- 
ment. It has no smoke, is fast 
and makes very little noise or 
I'eport. Absolutely clean! No 
shower of cinders or flying 
sparks. Has the highest endorse- 
ment of leading Press and Com- 
mercial photographers. 

How often have you, Mr. Photog- 
rapher, been called upon to make 
the portrait of a new arrival at 
the hotel, a home party, office 
scene, or banquet, where an 
"open flash" would be the quick- 
est and most eflicient lighting- 
medium to use. 

With NORWILL PRESS FLASH 

you can make not only one ex- 
posure, but several, without 
smoking up the interior in which 
you may be operating. 

The novelty of making a flash 
shot without the usual smoke, is 



also an advantage which should 
not be overlooked. It will invari- 
ably call forth favorable com- 
ment from your subjects. 

NORWILL PRESS FLASH reg 

isters in illumination comparable 
with non-smokeless powders 
when fast Panchromatic Plate or 
Film is used. When other than 
Panchromatic negative material 
is used, slightly more of the 
smokeless powder may be neces- 
sary. This point, however, is of 
small consequence when you con- 
sider the many advantages 
gained by using NORWILL 
PRESS FLASH. 

NORWIL PRESS FLASH 100 grams 

(3I2 oz.) . . $2.85 in U.S.A. 

(Slightly higher in Canada and Mexico) 

CAN BE SENT BY MAIL 

Order today 
from HIRSCH & KAYE 



About a week ago the morning' mail 
brought us a check for several hun- 
dred dollars in payment of supplies 
purchased. On the back of the en- 
velope was a seal, like a Christmas 
seal, reading — "Help prevent heart 
disease." Which prompts us to sug- 
gest that even if you don't have a 
supply of stickers, send your checks 
just the same. We will take our 
chances. 



Human life is so short that we 
must learn from the experiences of 
others as well as from our own. 



Improved carbons for Seattle Lamps 
now furnished on your orders. In 
stock, in the popular sizes. All orders 
will be filled with the new grade. 



Paffe tiuenty-fi've 




The New INGENTO 
Photo Mailer 



has the 
fastener 
sihle to 
or send 
vacv or 



The INGENTO is easily superior to any other 
photo mailer on the market. There is no chance 
of breaking photographs, drawings, sketches or any 
other valuable matter when this mailer is used, as 
they are perfectly preserved by the double corrugated 
board which covers the photograph or drawing both 
front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. 
The various sizes we manufacture are made to take 
all the popular up-to-date mounts in use by the 
leading studios throughout the country. 

The new No. 1. Ingento Photo Mailer is now 
made 8^/2 x 11% inches. It will accommodate photo- 
graphs 8x10 or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with 
super-strength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large 
prints, folders, enlargements and drawings. 



only double seal feature of string 
and gummed flap, making it pos- 

mail photos to foreign countries 
them by first-class mail when pri- 

additional safet}^ is desired. 

Made in the Folloiuing 

Popular Sizes 

2 5/2 X 75/^ 

3 6%x sy4. 



No. 
No. 

No. 
*No. 
*No. 
*No. 



4 7>4x 9^ 

5 8% X ioy2 

6 \0y4 xl2^ 

7..- 12>4xl4>< 

*No. 8 10>^xl5 

No. 9 ey X 9y 

*No. 10 7>4xll^ 

-*No. 11 8^x1114 

*No. 12 13 xl7>^ 

..No. 14 16 x20y4 

Packed in cartons containing fifty. 



and Cut Films. 



Manufactured b:y BURKE & JAMES, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Carried in Stock by HIRSCH 8C KAYE 

SIZES for any need ! PRICES none can meet ! Prompt Shipments ! 

Stop Waste. Save Time, Money, Solutions. 

For best results install a 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFIT 

AMATEUR FINISHING OUT- Two Sizes Commercial Outfits for Plates 

FIT for Roll Film and Circuit Work Made of the 

FINEST 
PORCELAIN 

ENAMEL 

THE BEST BY 
TEST 

ALL WATER- 
JACKETED OUT- 
FITS have washing 

space with circulat- ^. ., 111-., 

ing water around ^ize No. 1 accommodates both 5.x/ 

both inner tanks for and 8x10 Portrait Hangers. Size No. 2 
temperature regula- is built for Sx7's only. 





Made in 2 sizes 

5x12x42" holds 10 gallons 

8x12x42" holds 17 gallons 

Both Blue and white tanks. 



COMPLETE 

COMPACT 

ECONOMICAL 

Light in weight. 

Easily handled and 

cleaned. Durable, 

and Efficient. 

Avoid Spurious 
Tanks. Name "Ster- 
ling" on Ever y 
Tank. 



White Enameled Fixing Baths 




STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 

"Pioneer Tank Builders," Beaver Falls, Pa. 



12x16x5" 
18x24x6" 



Stock Sizes 

16x20x6" 
20x24x6" 



10x12x5" 
18x22x5" 
20x30x6" 



Pa{/e liuenty-six 



■c^ 



[ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



Oil Companies 

Share Air Survey 

"C IGHT oil companies in Califor- 
^-^ nia have completed the most 
extensive aerial survey for oil explo- 
ration yet attempted, mapping 2,200 
miles of mountainous terrain in Sa- 
linas Valley. Although competing 
companies have previously exchanged 
private surveys of certain areas, this 
is the first instance of cooperation on 
a large-scale mapping enterprise. 

The cost of survey is about $8 
to $10 per square mile. Each com- 
pany's expense was about one-tenth of 
what it would have cost to complete 
the job single-handed. General Pe- 
troleum Corporation, the Texas Com- 
pany, Shell, Continental, Associated, 
Union, Richfield, and Western Gulf 
bore the expense of the project and 
will share in its findings. 

Aerial survey is now an important 
phase of the oil geologist's work. 
During the past year more than 
20,000 square miles have been photo- 
graphed, mainly in California and 
Texas. The photographer must fly 
at a height of about 12,000 feet in 
parallel straight lines, talcing a series 
of overlapping pictures which are 
later indexed and combined into a 
mosaic, a map, or both. These maps 
show all topographic details, give an 
idea of sub-surface conditions, enable 
field geologists to do their work much 
more accurately and completely. 

Beside their value in exploration 
for oil, aerial maps are now exten- 
sively used for planning construction. 
Canada has already surveyed 300,000 
square miles ; has 650,000 negatives 
on Hie. 



Photographers have prepared to 
take huge, detailed pictures of 
Michelangelo's magnificent paintings 
in Rome's Sistine Chapel. Reason : 



the Michelangelos must be treated for 
chemical decay in the paint, damp air 
and dust effects, carbon deposits from 
the smoke of holy candles. The pho- 
tographs will be used to check the 
restorative process. 



Why the Blueprint 

Industry Is Blue 

SMALL orders and free delivery 
are making serious drains on the 
blueprint business; wastage of paper 
because of odd shapes of prints 
amount to a large reducible loss. 

According to figures reported by 
the Department of Commerce all 
blueprint orders of less than 75 cents 
show a loss. Few orders under $1 
pay. Apparently, if free delivery serv- 
ice is to be maintained, the minimum 
charge should be $1. Other possi- 
bilities would be to charge for deliv- 
ery on all orders of less than $1, or 
to refuse delivery service entirely for 
such orders. 

Few users of blueprints would ob- 
ject to a $1 minimum after such 
official recognition of the unprofit- 
ableness of smaller orders, provided 
most of the industry adopts %\ as the 
lowest on the schedule including com- 
plete service. 

The facts regarding photocopy or- 
ders are similar to those of the blue- 
prints. — "The Week's Business." 



An Emergency Lamp 
For Panchromatic Emulsion 

"V/^OU need not wait till you have 
-*■ a green Safelight to start to use 
Panchromatic Film. A very practical 
panchromatic safelight can be made 
by the use of a green celluloid or gel- 
atin glter, placed between the bulb 
and lens of an ordinary electric flash- 
light. Wratten Green Filters, gela- 
tin style are quite inexpensive and an 
average filter will make four safe- 



Paije tiuenty-se'ven 



[ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 




THE LATEST IN FLASH LAMPS 

Ingento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp 

(Patent Applied for) 
SAFE — POSITIVE IGNITION 
Guaranteed in Every Way 

The Ingento Sure-Shot 

Flash Lamp is the most 

perfect device of its kind 

ever produced. It was 

designed by a flash light 

expert to combine safety 

with positive firing. It does both. 

The safety latch holds the firing 

trigger in place securely until 

it is released by an antinous or 

wire release which raises the 

latch. It cannot be released by 

jarring or vibration. 

The positive ignition is se- 
cured by means of three spark- 
ing metals or flints which throw 
a large flame into the powder. 
In addition to the above, a quiet 
primer cartridge similar to that 
employed in shot guns may be 
used. Either will ignite the pow- 
der — with both ends you are 
The Ingento Sure- doubly sure. All mechanical parts 
Shot makes a safe are protected from the flash. 
hand lamp. This outfit is sturdily built and 

will give long service. 
The Ingento Sure- 
^hot Flash Lamps - 
in addition to be- 
ing hand lamps, 
can be placed on 
stands or hung 
from the ceiling 
and can be con- 
nected with a du- 
plex release for 
simultaneous fir- 
ing. By using 
long release it is' 
possible to set off, 
the flash at any| 
distance up to ten 
feet. 

The handle can be! 
slipped off quickly 
and the pan placecl 
in the ordinary 
flash bag, thusj 
eliminating a II 
heavy electric, 
wiring. 
We guaranttej 
this lamp to give] 
you 100% satis- 
faction in every 

way. Try the Ingento Sure-shot. If you don't agree 
that it is all we claim for it, send it back and your 
money will be cheerfully refunded. 

PRI CES 
No. 5 Ingento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 5" pan, 

each ^ $4.50 

No. 10 Ingento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 10" 

pan, each >■ 6.00 

No. 18 Ingento Sure-Shot Flash Lamp, 18" 

pan, each - - 7.50 

Sparkling Metals for above, each .10 

Primers for above per 100 1.00 

(Primers can be shipped by express 
or freight only) 
No. Nickel Plated 6 ft. folding stand, each.... 2.50 
12-ft. Dual Release for operating two Ingento 

Sure-Shot Lamps simultaneously, each 4.50 

Manufactured and Guaranteed by 

BURKE & JAMES, INC. 





business-like! 

Prints backed with 
Holliston Photo 
Cloth are business- 
like — in appearance 
and in serviceability . 
They are flexible, 
yet firm, and have 
sharp, clean edges 
which positively do 
not fray. 

Every print should 
have a cloth back if 
itisexpectedtolook 
well after constant 
handling. Recom- 
mend cloth-backed 
prints to your cus- 
tomers ■ — for their 
good and for your 
own. 



Sold on a 
money back 
Guarantee 




J 



"iZ?, W. Madison St. 



Chicago, III. 



^age twenty-eight 



i THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



Bargains for the Photographer 



401-70 Sept Motion Picture Camera 
with F3.5 Lens and Carrying Case. 
Can also be used for instantaneous 
or Bulb exposures, uses Standard 
size 35 M.M. motion picture film. 
In good condition. Bargain Price 
$17.50. 

41-26 8x10 Anthony Scovill Studio 
Camera and Anthony Scovill Stand. 
Back of Camera has been recon- 
structed and now has an Eastman 
8x10 Back which takes the Eastman 
View Plateholder or Portrait film 
holder. In good condition. Com- 
plete. Bargain Price $39.50. 



250-51 Halldorson Studio Lamp with 
4 1500 Watt clear Mazda Lamps. 
In good condition. Bargain Price 
$59.50. 

806-82 Pair 12" Condensors mounted 
in Round metal cell. Used but con- 
dition O. K. Barain Price $42.50. 

284-55 #3 Halldorson Home Portrait 
Plash Lamp with electric Igniter. 
In good condition. Bargain Price 
$27.50. 

420-72 Halldorson Portable Arc 
Lamp. Shopworn only. Used as dem- 
onstration. Bargain Price $42.50. 



Cameras for your own use or for 
rental service. 



221-48 No. 1 Film Premo Camera 
■with R. R. lens, size 3%x4i/t for 
film pack only. Good condition. 
Bargain Price $3.25. 

105-33 Rexo Folding Roll film cam- 
era, with Goerz Dagor lens 5" focus 
in Ilex Acme shutter and carrying- 
case. Size 3%x4i4. Used but in 
good condition. Bargain Price 
$31.50. 

145-38 Revolving Back Auto Graflex 
Camera with Kodak Anastigmat 
F4.5 lens. Plate Holder and carry- 
ing Case. Used but condition O. K. 
Bargain Price $99.50. 

32-25 #3 Folding Pocket Kodak with 
R. R. Lens in Carrying Case. In 
good condition. Bargain Price 

$8.50. 

66-29 3A Folding Pocket Kodak with 
FT. 7 lens. Used but in good condi- 
tion. Bargain Price $12.25. 

320-60 4A Folding Pocket Kodak 
with R. R. lens and Carrying Case. 
Uses Roll film size 4%x6%. Used 
but condition 0. K. Bargain Price 
$14.75. 

367-66 Eastman Cine Kodak with 
F6.5 lens and Carrying Case. A-1 
condition. Bargain Price $42.50. 



266-53 Vest Pocket Kodak size 1% x 
2^2 with F7.7 Anastigmat Lens in 
Sende Carrying Case. Used but 
good condition. Bargain Price 
$5.25. 

385-68 Vest Pocket Kodak with Rapid 
Rectalinear lens. In good condi- 
tion. Bargain Price $5.25. 

826-1 Vest Pocket Goerz Tenax Cam- 
era with Dagor F6.8 lens in case. 
Three extra Supplementary lenses 
and eighteen plateholders. For use 
with plates only. In good condi- 
tion. Bargain Price $9.75. 

924-12 Dallmeyer Speed Camera with 
Pentac F2.9 lens, Focal Plane 
shutter, Film pack adapter and 
carrying case. Shopworn only. Size 
l%x2%. Used but condition O.K. 
Bargain Price $52.50. 

948-15 2-K Ensignette Camera with 
F7.7 lens and carrying case. Uses 
Eastman Roll film size 2x3". Used 
but in good condition. Bargain 
Price $6.00. 



Pa{/e tivcnty-nine 






c9.1 



O^ 



:i> 



I 



[ THE FOCUS for MARCH, 1930 } 



DEFENDER 
MONOKROM 

For color by contact 
or projection 



Moeokirom IS AN IDEAL PRINTING 
MEDIUM FOR EXPRESSING YOUR PHO- 
TOGRAPHIC ART IN COLOR . . PERMIT- 
TING TASTES AND TREATMENT IN 
COMPLETE SYMPATHY WITH THE 
SUBJECT. 

Moeokirom IS SENSITIZED WITH 
DEFENDER IRIS FOR CONTACT AND 
WITH VELOUR BLACK FOR PROJEC- 
TION. 

Manufactured Exclusively by 



A^ 



DEFENDER PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY Inc f 

\ ROCHESTEF^.N.Y. ? 




Page thirty 




There is always an element of uncertainty in 
the processing of films, plates and papers if 
there is any question as to the quality and suit- 
ability of the chemicals you use. 

You can be sure of your results — can elimi- 
nate uncertainty by using chemicals which 
are made, tested and recommended by the 
manufacturers of the sensitive materials you use. 

Eastman Tested Chemicals are made and 
recommended to safeguard your results. Specify 
^^Eastman Tested" and be sure. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Papc thirty-orii 



Retain the 
Sitter s 
Likeness 




Because the detail and modeling within the 
highlights and shadows — so expressive of fine 
shades of character — are recorded with a truth 
and clearness possible only in a non-halation 
material, Eastman Portrait Film enables you to 
secure better likenesses of your sitters. And be- 
cause of this same non-halation quality you 
are able to use the lighting that most pleas- 
ingly displays your sitter's character. For better 
likenesses with less need of retouching, use 
Eastman Portrait Film, Par Speedy Super Speed 
and Panchromatic^ at your dealer's. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Qx- 



T^ FOCUS 



H 



Vuhlish-ed Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 



Vol. L. ME V^I 



APRIL, 1930 



No. 4 




CiABRlEL Moui.iS', 153 Kearny St., San Francisco, Calif., niade this pri/e-vvinninn picture ot a 
ifornia Packing Corporation Plant. Made with +;.- oz X'ictor Flash Powder, Normal Crade, 
r'eleitijf Jtast^af^fetTv-Goerz Dajjor "'/> in. I ■ r.s. Stop between F.ll and F.16. 



LlSriAfiY 







-^ 



APR 25 \92Q- WITHDRAWN 

F^Ec^ublish^^wy 



H & KAYE 



ia^i^Sii=ilf^- 



ir*-'^^^*' 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 




INDIATONE 

^ ^ ^ 4> A desirable new paper that oFFers unusual 
warmth in both contact and projection printing 



INDIATONE is a new and beautiful paper for 
projection of rich living warmth. It offers all 
the deef} full gradations of a perfect contact 
print with a potential in warmth exceeding that 
not only of present projection papers, but 
contact papers as well. 

Such adaptability has not, in the past, been so 
readily obtainable in the faster papers used for 
projection, which have tended to run colder, 
and with the increase in selling large portraits 
from small negatives, this has been a disadvantage. 

The speed of Indiatone is designed to meet 
the requirements of those now using high-power- 
ed projection equipment. It is thus slower than 
Bromide, but many times faster than contact 
portrait papers. It can, however, be used for 
contact work by screening down the light. 

Indiatone is a paper which you will be sure 
to like, but, more important, it is a paper which 
will enable you to sell larger sizes from small 
negatives more effectively, increasing the return 
in dollars on your sittings. 



» » 



AGFA ANSCO CORPORATION, BINGHAMTON, N. Y. 



Pa^/e tiL'o 



=p FOCUS 



H 



Published Monthly in the Interests of Professional Photography 

by HIRSCH & KAYE, 239 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 



Vol. VI 



APRIL, 1930 



No. 4 




"//(■ canniil 
Irlrf'/ionr fur 
drii-vrry" 



IN THE PROFESSION 



The scene of our 
little story this month 
takes us to Raratonga, 
Cook Islands. These 
islands will be found 
south of the Hawaiian 
Islands and east of 
Australia. Here is lo- 
cated Sydney Hopkins, 
who has conducted a 

studio there for the past nineteen 

years. 

Born in Reading, England, his par- 
ents moved to London when he was 
three years of age. His parents were 
successful in agriculture and in com- 
merce, but young Sydney cared for 
niether of these. He wanted to travel. 
So he left school at fifteen, and three 
years later, we find him traveling to 
Africa to take part in the Boer War. 

An apprentice, working for his 
father, had meanwhile purchased a 
camera, and young Hopkins decided 
he wanted one and proceeded to 
build a camera consisting of a card- 
board box, a spectacle lens and a 
rotary shutter operated by an elastic 
band. There being no drug store 
service where he could leave his film, 
he had to learn to finish his own film. 

The year 1911 found him in Cali- 
fornia, and then we heard of him 
from Cook Islands. He is unmarried, 



free froiii fraternal or association con- 
nections. 

His orders arrive with each steamer 
and if you will find the Cook Islands 
on your map, you'll realize that he 
cannot phone for immediate delivery 
oi a dozen proof paper or something 
else that he may ha\e overlooked. In 
spite of distance from his "logical 
source of supply," the service he re- 
ceives seems to be adequate. 



MAKE no little plans; they have 
no magic to stir men's blood, 
and probably themselves will not be 
realized . Make big plans; aim high 
in hope and work, remebering that 
a noble, logical diagram once recorded 
will never die, but long after we are 
gone will be a living thing, asserting 
itself with ever-growing intensity. 
Remember that our sons and grand- 
sons are going to do things that would 
stagger us. Let your watchword he 
order and your beacon beauty. 

— Daniel II. Burnhaiii. 



/i LMOST anybody can do busi- 
■^~±. ness fairly well. Many men 
can do business verv well. A few 
can do business superbly well. But 
the man who not only does his work 
superbly well, but adds to it a touch 
of personality, through great zeal, 
patience, persistence, making it indi- 
vidual, distinct and unforgettable, is 
an artist. — Elbert Hubbard. 



Page three 



C THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



Successes Pile Up' 



Picturing with 

Special Brands for Special Work, 

with emulsions made and tested 

in Hammer laboratories, 

is bringing to the studio 

better results and more money 

with less labor. 



Make negatives 

that not only have detail 

but have a roundness of tone values 

in the highlights and in the shadows, 

necessary for the better print. 




RES. TRADE MARK 



Write for portfolio of prints 

HAMMER DRY PLATE CO. 



Ohio Ave & Miami St. 
St. Louis 



159 West 22nd St., 
New York Citv 



COOPER HEWITT LAMPS 

( Mercury Vapor) 

Three times more actinic than sunlight, and faster than arc lamps. 
Used for Portrait Lighting, Copying and Enlarging. 

Require no special wiring and consume an unbelievably small amount of 
current. 

Supplied for permanent or portable installation. Write for catalogues. 

for sale by HIRSCH & KAYE 



CHARCOAL BLACK 

AN UNUSUAL PAPER /or PROJECTION PRINTING 

Designed for those icho wish their prints to eoniniand attention 
and produce nerr business 

Grade "A" Thin Parchment— Grade "B"' Medium Weight Parchment 

Price per dozen— 8x10, $1.70; 11x14, $3.25 
Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 



Paffe four 



{ IT-IE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



:: PROFESSIONAL SERVICE :: 



DUNCAN G. BLAKISTON 

PORTRAIT PAINTER 

PhotoKi-aphic Prints Executed in Oil, 

Water Color, Black and White Sepia, etc. 

Also Ivory Miniatures. 

50 Golden Gate Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Room 420 - - Phone Prospect 476 



SAVE TIME, WORRY, and MONEY 

By having your Quantity Printing done 
by a firm that specialises in 

QUANTITY PRODUCTION 

All sises up to 11x14 

Minimum 100 from Negative 

Quick Service Work Guaranteed 

J. K. PIGGOTT CO. 

86 Third St. SAN FRANCISCO 



RETOUCHING 

That Is Better 

ETCHING 

That Is Superior 

LOUISE C. BESTLER 

5703 College Avenue 



OAKLAND 



CALIF. 



Retouching — Etching — 
Negative Work 

Send your order to 

ANNE ROSTON 

2341 Bay St., San Francisco 
WEst :5963 




Need Lamps? 

Most likely you do. 

All sizes and styles for 

(home, office, or studio. 

Can be ordered 

from 



HIRSCH & KAYE 



Ever-Ready Service 

Opal or Ivorette Miniatures and Photo- 
graphic prints — artistically done in real oils. 
Negative Retouching — Etching 

We are equipped to print your miniatures 
from your negatives or copy from photo- 
graphs. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention 

RAE BRITTON 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Graystone 7912 1285 Geary St. 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

Best Quality and Service 

Retouching, Lantern Slide 
and Photo Coloring 

OPAL MINIATURES 

MAUD B. COREY 

•^91H STEINER STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



QUANTITY PRINTS 

Special Discounts to the Trade 

ALTA STUDIOS, INC. 

1271 Mission St. SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone MArket 9581 



Pa{/e fit'c 



I THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

For Perfect Pictures 




( Call it /G\ Gan-^ert) 



Super Chromosa 

The new Gevaert Plate for speed work 

Portrait Bromide 

An Enlarging Paper Par Excellence 

¥i-33 "- Buff Platino Gravure 

A new surface for the discriminating 
photographer 

Ortho Commercial Film 

The ideal film for commercial photography 

Descriptive Catalog on Request 

Address Dept. No. S 



1 he iJevaert L'ompanv ol ilmeriea, Inc. 
423-439 W. 55th St. New York City 



Chicago, III. 
4i:i-4ai N. State Street 



Toronto, Ont. 
;U7-49 Adelaide Street. W. 



Manufacturers of Photographic Products 
for more than a third of a century 



All Gevaert Products for Sale by HIRSCH Sc KAYE, 

San Francisco 

Fresh Stock Prompt Shipments 

Service Dependable Merchandise Lo^v Prices 




If we ask the average professional 
photographer to name the most profit- 
able branch of his all-the-3'ear-round 
work, he will unhesitatingly answer: 
photographing children. And many 
claim and advertise that they make a 
specialty of children. Some go so far 
as to ha\e "Baby Days." But, strange 
to tell, very few seem to think it 
worth while to study and prepare 
themselves for special proficiency in 
this most profitable line of work. 
Some years ago, Mr. E. B. Core es- 
tablished a studio for children only 
in New York. Despite his success, 
he had no competition as a specialist, 
and since he retired, a year or two 
ago, America is without a studio de- 
voted exclusively to the making of 
pictures of children. There is un- 
doubtedly a profitable opening here in 
most of our larger cities for some man 
or woman with skill and resourceful- 
ness. The chances of success would, 
of course, be made more certain by 
the undertaking, together with the 
studio work, of the photographing of 
children at home. 

EXPERT ADVICE 

How shall the professional win 
larger success in child-portraiture? 
Mr. Core tells us that the principal 
factors which enter into the making 
of the successful photographer of 
children are good nature and patience. 
He adds: While a certain amount of 
firmness, as well as love, rules the 



{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

Tlhiegs Yoe SlhoeM 

HFEPFUr, HINTS From HERE and THERE 

Photographing Children 

home-life of the little ones, in the 
studio it must all be love and patience. 
Don't expect to make pleasing pic- 
tures of children if you are bored by 
their childish prattle. Few things on 
earth are "sweeter than their bright, 
happy faces. Nothing more interest- 
ing than their description of the new- 
est doll or the big brown dog at home. 
1 love to hear them talk and always 
seek to draw them out, using some- 
times a little story to help me. I try 
to have them feel that they are doing 
just what they want to do themselves. 
You can lead but seldom drive them. 
Wy aim is always to so entertain or 
amuse them that they either do not 
realize or are unconscious of the fact 
that I am photographing them. They 
frequently say, "Ain't I goin' to have 
iny picture taken?" after I am all 
through, thinking that they have only 
been having a romp with me. Don't 
shove them out the moment the sitting 
is completed. For there are none so 
quick to detect insincerity, and none 
so quick to repay any affection you 
may show them. Further, your inter- 
est in the children finds a ready re- 
sponse in the mother's pocketbook. 

]\Iadame D'Ora, of Vienna, tells 
LIS that she believes in letting 
the little ones play among them- 
sehes or with their toys, attempting 
no false positions or studied arrange- 
ments, but taking the pictorial oppor- 
tunities as they come. Left to them- 
selves, with the camera always ready 
at hand, they never fail to offer abun- 
dant opportunities for picfures full of 
grace and childish charm. 

(Continued on Page 9) 



Paeje seven 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 




"For fiftij ijears 

Tue used MdUinckrodt chemicals. 

TheijVe fine, trustoorthij friends.' 



Write for your 

copy of our 

Handbook 

**Chemistry of 

Photography*^ 




"Physically and Chemically Perfected" 



Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 

A constructive force in the chemical industry since 1867 

ST. LOUIS MONTREAL PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 



Pane eiaht 



t THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



The great thing is to keep the child 
sitter as normal as possihie. and if the 
amuser can contrive to make him for- 
get altogether that there is a camera 
and a man behind it in close prox- 
imit\', and this without undue excite- 
ment, then the amuser's work will be 
done and the photographer will be left 
free to watch for and seize his oppor- 
tunities, which, if the child is quietly 
and rationally amusing itself, should 
soon appear. 

But how, probably asks the reader, 
is the volatile young sitter to be kept 
in one place? This is the business of 
the amuser, who is greatly aided by 
arrangements of background and fore 
grovmd, which will be more fully de- 
scribed later on. And so, skipping for 
the present the surroundings of the 
child, we pass on to the consideration 
of posing. 

BEWARE OF POSING 

Speaking broadly, a child should 
hardly ever be posed. Even the most 
self-conscious youngster, with dexter- 
ous management, can be induced to 
forget itself, and when once this is 
accomplished, ease and grace as if by 
magic appear. The one unforgivable 
mi in the portrait of a child is self- 
consciousness, and so it must be avoid- 
ed at all costs. Boys quite as much 
as girls suffer from it, and will often 
completely spoil a picture if asked to 
"keep like that just a second." Indeed, 
the suggestion that they should look 
at the camera is almost always fol- 
lowed by disaster. Consequently, with 
children that are at all nervous, full- 
faced portraits should be avoided. But 
of sourse self-consciousness is just as 
noticeable in figure as in face. The 
prim little girl who has made up her 
mind beforehand exactly how she will 
sit for her photograph, and is bent on 
carrying it out, may even necessitate 
the imaginary exposing of several 
plates, and then, if the photographer 



will with some ostentation pronounce 
it all over, he may, if he is quick and 
has his plates quite handy, immediately 
get some good natural relaxed por- 
traits; for when once what is con- 
sidered the ordeal is over, the child, 
in common with the adult, will 
straightway relax and usually look its 
\ery best and most natural self. 

Children are often best taken 
standing, for they naturally spend so 
much of their time on their legs; but 
if kept long they are likely to get stiff 
and set. If this awkwardness does 
not go of itself, much may be done 
with quite little children by the 
amuser jumping them up in the air. 
They seem to land again on the floor 
with quite a new stock of strength 
and grace. Again, most difficulties 
with little girls can often be sur- 
mounted by the photographer taking 
them into his confidence and getting 
them to help him make a picture of 
their favorite doll, or a real live kitten 
will ans\\'cr the same purpose. They 
will busy themselves over such sub- 
jects, and never seem to dream that 
the eye of the lens is impartially in- 
cluding them as well as their pets. 

And all this trouble is to be taken 
to avoid self-consciousness! Yes, and 
it is worth it, and that is why I have 
rather gone into detail over means to 
avoid this unforgivable fault in a 
child picture; for is not even a poor 
snap-shot of a natural, spontaneous 
attitude worth more than the most 
technically perfect negative of a con- 
sciously posed goody little person? 

In photographing yoiuig children, 
quickness and quietness of manipula- 
tion and movement are big helps to 
successful negatives. 

— From Photo Miniature No. 152. 
See Page 7. 



Sa\-e your copies of The P'ocus 
for future reference. 



Page nine 



C THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 




This illustration of the rifn' Hudson 
Rivrr Bridge is from a pliotograpli 
made by 0. R. Applegate of Tren- 
ton, N. J., 'with the Series III 
J'flostigmat Wide Angle lens f9.5. 



Insist on a, . . 

Wollensak Wide Angle Lens 



for Dependable Results 



W. 



OLLENSACK WIDE ANGLE lenses give the finest results 
in wide angle work, they are thoroly corrected, give 90° to 100° 
angle and the sharp sparkling definition that is demanded. They 
are made in convenient sizes and priced within the reach of all. 



THE SERIES HI 
Velostigmat Wide Angle f9.5 

A 90° anastigma.t wide angle working 
at a speed of f9.5, one of the fastest 
Wide Angle lenses on the market 
today. Ideal for focusing where light- 
ing is poor. 



THE SERIES IIIA 
Extreme Wide Angle fl2:5 

A splendid moderate priced Wide 
Angle. It has an exceptionally large 
circle of illumination making it ideal 
for banquet camera.^, where extreme 
wide angle is required. 



Send for Catalog oi- obtain one 
of these lenses from your Dealer 
today — A trial will convince you. 



WOLLENSAK OPTICAL COMPANY 



872 HUDSON AVEM E 

Makirs of photographic hn: 
shutters since 1S99 



R()( HESTER, NEW YORK 

cs and 



Page ten 



C THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

The Family Album is Coming Back 



To Resume Honored Place 
Boston Post Tells Us 

EVERY now and then somebody 
stages a revival of some olden 
custom, reaching hack into the dis- 
tant past and bringing forth into the 
light of today some practice which 
was once common but which has long 
since been obsolete. 

Time was, in the alleged good old 
davs, that a first-class album was a 
practical necessity in every home. It 
broke the ice, to use a homely expres- 
sion. According to accounts as handed 
down from generation to generation, 
when the swains of the day went 
"sparking," a family album was a 
great help. 

After Elmer had been separated 
from his hat and coat he usually sat 
on the edge of a chair in one corner 
of the parlor, and Myrtle, let us call 



her, perched on the haircloth sofa. 
Elmer would start out bravely enough 
in the small talk of the day, with 
Myrtle's assistance, but ere long he 
would be more likely to "lag in the 
breeching," as the bucolic gentlemen 
used to phrase it. He ran out of ideas 
and it would begin to look as though 
the evening was going to be a wash- 
out. 

Then Mvrtle would trot out the 
old standby, the family album, and 
Elmer would be granted the boon of 
a peek at Uncle Abner when he played 
first cornet in the town band. 

And just remember that a girl 
can't help a young man "turn the 
pages" if she's on the other side of 
the room. Oh, the family album came 
in very handy in the old days. No 
home was complete without one. 

And now we read it is coming back. 




SURESTICK 

The New Vacuum 
Dispenser 

A White 
Liquid Photographic Glue 

No odor; always ready; sticks quickly; 
does not draw, discolor or harm your 
prints; will not get stiff wlien ex- 
posed to air. 

Surestick Never Cracks Loose 

whether slip under, corner mounts, parchment or tipped-on sheets. For gluing 
prints in albums, sealing backs of picture frames, plaque work — any place a 
high grade adhesive is required it is far superior. Only small amount required. 
A trial will convince you Surestick IS RIGHT. 

Vacuum Dispensers, which may be refilled 

Half Pint 5.5c Pints 90c 

Plain Jars— Half pint 50c Pint 85c 

Quart $1.50 Gallon $5 

SMITH CHEMICAL CO., DEFIANCE, OHIO 
Sold by HIRSCH & KAYE 



Pagie eleven 




t THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

The Photo^Miniatinre 
Series 

Helpful Books on Many Subjects 
Instructive — Interesting 

The PHOTO-MINIATURE is no longer re- 
printed. Once an issue is out of print, it is very 
difficult to obtain copies, even second-hand, ex- 
cept at premium. Notice our attractive offer: 



30. 

37. 

40. 

52. 

60. 

86. 

96. 
102. 
109. 
111. 
115. 
117. 
119. 
125. 
127. 
129. 
131. 
132. 

138. 
^145. 

146. 
150. 
152. 
153. 
154, 
155. 
157. 
158. 

159. 
160. 
161. 
162. 
163. 
164. 

165. 
199. 



Photographing Interiors 200. 

Film Photography 201. 

Platinotype Modifications 202. 

Aerial Photography 166. 

Who Discovered Photography 167. 

Carbon Printing 168. 

Leaves from an Amateur's Notebook 169. 

Trimming, Mounting and Framing 170. 



Drapery and Accessories 
Photography as a Business 

Platinum Printing 
Outdoors with the Camera 
The Optical Lantern 
Pocket Camera Photography 
Amateur Portraiture 
Group Photography 

Simplified Photography 
Getting Results with Your Hand 
Camera 
Travel and the Camera 



171. 

172. 
173. 

174. 
175. 
176. 
177. 
178. 
179. 
180. 



Failures — and Why; in Negative 181. 
Making 

Success with the Pocket Camera ^^2 

Commercial Photography j^g?^ 

Photographing the Children ^g^ 

Optical Notions for Photographers jg^ 
Photographic Printing Papers j^gg 

Photography in Winter j^g-y 

Exposure Indoors ]^gg 

Photographic Apparatus — Made at ^gg 
Home 

Success- with the Hand Camera 
Landscape Photography 
Sports and the Camera 
Hand Camera Tips and Pointers 
Making Money with the Camera 
Enlarged Negatives and Transpar 
encies 

LInconventional Portraiture 
Camera Hohdays 



190. 
191. 
192. 
193. 
194. 
196. 
197. 
198. 



Handling and Mixing Chemicals 
Handhng and Mixing Chemicals 
A Chemical Dictionary 
Specialized Commercial Methods 
Modern Photographic Developers 
How to Develop the Negative 
Photographic Words and Phrases 
Cloudland and Sky ^ 

Retouching and Improving Nega- 
tives 

The Hands in Portraiture 
Figures, Facts and Formulae 
(2nd Series) 

Home and Garden Portraiture 
Stereoscopic Photography 
Design in Picture Making 
Selling Photographs to Advertisers 
Photography as a Craft 
Photographic Emulsions 
Photography with a Hand Camera 
The Air Brush and the Photog- 
rapher 

Studio Design and Equipment 
Color Photography 
Soft Focus Effects in Photography 
Kallitype and Allied Processes 
Bromoil Prints and Transfers 
Photographic Lenses — In Use 
The Exhibition Print 
Enlargers for Pocket Cameras 
Stereophotography 
Out of Doors with a Hand Camera 
What Pictorialism Is 
Projection Printing 
Photographic Failures 
Copying Methods 
Profitable Photography 
High Speed Photography 



SPECIAL— 25c Per Copy — Five for One Dollar 



Faoe twelve 



{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

Up-to-date photographers are giving the Home Album idea serious thought 

and attention. Here are illustrated two styles, and with 

a plan to introduct this proposition to your customers. 




THE HOME ALBUM 

CHOICE of two covers. Styles A-1 and A-2 are artificial leather, Spanish, multi- 
toned, in dark green and seal brown. Style B has a genuine leather cover in olive 
green, surfaced, in a beautiful pine-needle effect, and lined and ornamented in 
genuine gold leaf. 

They are loose-leaf st_\les. The leaves, in a neutral shade, are the same for all three 
albums. This means they are interchangeable and also means less stock to carry. These 
leaves are cloth hinged and each leaf supplied ^vith a featherweight fly-leaf as a pro- 
tection to the portrait. 

The selling plan is this: The initial sale to the customer is the binder, which, when 
sold at list price, nets the studio 100% profit on the investment. The cost of the leaves 
is included in the service charge, ■which, of course, will vary according to the Avork done. 

The customers deliver to the studio the portraits they want mounted. This, inci- 
dentally, also gives the studio the opportunity to suggest new prints, copies, or enlarge- 
ments. In addition to personal solicitation in sales room, we furnish a special business 
letter to let the studio trade know of this proposition. The business letters are a vital 
factor to get the proposition started, so do not overlook these. The cost is small. 

Two-color shoAv cards (size 7x 9}g) to fit the frames for the sales room and display- 
case are supplied free. 

Sample on receipt of list price, and ice ivill include, no chartje, a show 
card and sample of the special business letter 

THE HOME ALBUM 

Number Price Each. 

A-1 Olive Green — Deluxe Artificial Leather $ 5.00 

A-2 Hazel Brown — Deluxe Artificial Leather 5.00 

B Olive Green — Genuine Leather ^ 15.00 

{Studio Discount 50%) 
All ll^xl+'/4 outside size — Each cover boxed individuallv 

LEAVES 

Neutral color only — one st\le for all albums, including fly-leaf — 

20 cents each net (25 in a carton) 

Home albums are constant reminders that up-to-date photographs are needed. The\- 

keep the photographs where they can be seen instead of being relegated to some trunk 

or dresser drawer. It is worth while for all studios to get back of the HOME ALBUM 

portrait idea. It makes for a be(ter, a greater and a more substantial business. 

Older from HIRSCH & KAYE 



Pa</e thirteen 



! ATIASTI cyl Petfeel Mailer \ 

I WE SELL ^ ! 

I 'TheNewIngenta \ 

I Photo M^ler i 



The New INGENTO Photo Mailer 

Has the only double seal feature of string fastener 
and gummed flap, making it possible to mail photos 
to foreign countries or send them by first-class mail 
when privacy or additional safety is desired. 

The INGENTO is easily superior to any other photo 
mailer on the market. There is no chance of breaking pho- 
tographs, drawings, sketches or any other valuable matter 
when this mailer is used, as they are perfectly preserved by 
the double corrugated board v.hich covers the photograph or 
drawing both front and back. The capacity of this mailer is 
greater than others and it is more quickly sealed. The vari- 
ous sizes we manufacture are made to take all the popular 
up-to-date mounts in use by the leading studios throughout 
the country. 

The new No. 11 Ingento Photo Mailer is now made 
8% X 1114 inches. It will accommodate photographs 8x10 
or 7x11 inches in size. 

The No. 14 Mailer is made extra strong with super- 
MADE IN THE FOLLOWINGstrength corrugated board ; it is ideal for large prints, 

folders, enlargements and drawings. 




POPULAR SIZES 

No. 2.... 51/2 X 7% 

No. 3- - - 6%x 8Vi 

No. 4.... 7% X 9% 

*No. 5 8% X 101/0 

*No. 6..... 10% X 12% 

*No. 7 12%xl4% 

*No. 8. 10i/,xl5 

No. 9 61,4 X 9Vi 

*No. 10...... 71/2 x 11% 

*No. 11 8% X 11%^.,^^^ , 

*No. 12 13 X 17^SIZES for any need 

No. 14 16 _x 20% 

Packed in cartons containing 50 



Manufactured by 

BURKE & JAMES, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carried in Stock by IIIRSCH & KAYE 

PRICES none can meet! 
Prompt Shipments 



Stop Waste. Save Time, Money, Solutions. 

For best results install a 

STERLING DEVELOPING TANK OUTFIT 

AMATEUR FINISHING OUT- Xwo Sizes Commercial Outfits for Plates 

FIT for Roll Film and Circuit Work Made of the j r- . i^-i 

FTNFST ^ Films. 

PORCELAIN 
ENAMEL 

THE BEST BY 
TEST 

ALL WATER- 
JACKETED OUT- 
FITS have washing 
space with circulat- 
ing water around ""^^ 

both inner tanks for and 8x10 Portrait Hangers. Size No. 2 
temperature regula- is built for Sx7's only, 
tion. 





accommodates both 5x7 



Made in 2 sizes 

5x12x42" holds 10 gallons 

8x12x42" holds 17 gallons 

l^oth Blue and white tanks. 



COMPLETE 

COMPACT 

ECONOMICAL 

Light in weight. 

Easily handled and 

cleaned. Durable, 

and Efficient. 

Avoid Spurious 
Tanks. Name "Ster- 
ling" on Every 
Tank. 



White Enameled Fixing Baths 




STERLING PHOTO MFG. CO. 

"Pioneer Tank Builders," Beaver Falls, Pa. 



12x16x5" 
18x24x6" 



Stock; Sizes 

16x20x6" 
20x24x6" 



10x12x5" 
18x22x5" 

20x30x6" 



PiKje fourteen 






I THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



Start a Bonfire 

BURN THEM UP! One of the big- problems with every 
studio — at least it is always so considered, is the carrying- 
over of unsold mountings from one season to the next. 
The photographer is in no worse situation here than the automobile 
dealer who finds that he has sold his stock of new cars but has 
accumulated an inventory of used ones, or the radio dealer who finds 
himself in much the same fix- But the sellers of automobiles are 
gradually coming to realize that there is no use in fooling themselves 
as to the value of these outworn machines, and in many cities they 
have banded together and incorporated junk-yards which dispose 
of the worst of the wrecks at least. And in Philadelphia, recently, 
u number of radio dealers destroyed in a big bonfire a thousand or 
more old radio sets which they had taken in trade. We believe that 
photographers can find a lesson here. 

Many a studio ov\'ner, finding himself when the season is over 
vv'ith a surplus of unused mountings, carries them on his inventory 
and frequently fools himself into thinking that his studio, for that 
reason, is worth more than it will actually bring at a sale. For no 
wise buyer allows anything for a stock of old mountings, no matter 
how large. Some studio ownei's go so far as to vow to themselves 
that they will buy no new lines of mountings until they have dis- 
posed of the old ones — we know of one studio which kept unopened 
a large case of new stock for months, until an old accumulation 
had been used up. This is the height of poor business. Not only 
is the photographer kidding himself, but he is shutting the door 
to new customers and losing the opportunity of getting a better 
price by showing newer and more salable mountings. 

These old stocks of mountings arise from several causes. 
Occasionally a salesman deliberately oversells an easy customer, 
though this is not the case when the studio deals with reputable 
houses. More frequently the customer over-estimates his require- 
ments and becomes over-enthusiastic about prospects. Sometimes, 
particularly in localities dependent on a single industry, an entirely 
unforeseen strike or calamity may practically close dov/n the town. 
These things must be faced frankly. Do the clothier and the haber- 
dasher refuse to buy new styles until they have sold all last season's 
goods — not by a jugful! They cut prices below cost if necessary, 
or sell out the old stock to some firm dealing in out-of-date goods. 
The photographer's way out is not so easy, from the pocketbook 

[ See Page 19 ] 



Paffe fifteen 



■■€/®' 



C THE FOCUS for APRIL. 1930 ] 




Of two thousand photographs sub- 
mitted to the Committee on Adver- 
tising Photographers' Association of 
America for use during the next six 
months advertising campaign for com- 
mercial photographers, two prints out 
of six accepted Avere the work of 
Albert Hiller of Pasadena. It is 
very gratifying to know that our 
Pacific Coast photographei's rank with 
the best in the United States, and our 
congratulations go to Mr. Hiller. 

Another triumph for the North- 
west. The Seattle Times will erect 
a new building that will be two blocks 
long and a half block deep. It will 
be the finest newspaper building in 
the world and we are given to under- 
stand that it will eclipse the famous 
Chicago Tribune building, recently 
completed. 

The photo section, in charge of 
Another Smith, will occupy an 
entire floor. 

W. A. Clinch, popular operator 
at the Whigham Studios on Mission 
Street, is back at his work after a 
siege in the hospital. We are glad 
to notice liis improved health. 

J. H. Eastman plans a new studio 
in Susanville, located in the I.O.O.F. 
Building. He is apparently keeping 
pace with the development of the 
northeast corner of California. 



An addition planned for the East- 
man Kodak Company office building 
will give Rochester one of the tallest 
buildings in the State outside, of 
course, of New York City. The 
building will rise 340 feet from the 
ground. The new space will contain 
the offices of George Eastman and the 
executives of the Companv. 

With regret we learn of a serious 
illness of Mr. J. C. Gordon, com- 
mercial photographer of San Jose, 
who has been confined to his bed with 
pneimionia. A comforting word comes 
to us, however, that the crisis is past, 
and that the patient is definitely on 
the gain, and so we are saying with 
his many friends — 
"We're mightv glad vou're getting 
well. 

Sure vou must be, too. 

Hope the doctors never make 

Another cent off you." 

B. R. Harwood is now settled in 
his new ground floor location, in 
^-ledford, Oregon. From all indica- 
tions he is planning for a prosperous 

future. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Perry Evans 
of Portland, were visitors to the East 
Ba)' Cities when they came to spend 
a few days with friends in Oakland. 
Mr. Evans is active in P. LP. A. 
work. 



Paae sixteen 






{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

In a train collision recently nearcisco, is now with Lumiere Studio, 
Santa Barbara, serious damage was Salt Lake City. He assumes manage- 



sustained by one of Fred Hartsook's 
traveling studios. Nautically speak- 
ing, the aft section was completely 
demolished, although able to continue 
under its own power. 

We learn through witnesses at the 
scene of accident that no personal 
injuries were suffered by its occu- 
pants, which is indeed fortunate. 

During the month past, it was the 
privilege of the writer to visit Mr. 
James Donnelly, formerly with 
HiRSCH & Kaye, at his new commer- 
cial studio in Santa Barbara. While 
covering the entire commercial held, 
Mr. Donnelly is specializing in med- 
ical photography, an avenue of work 
he finds both profitable and intrig- 
uing. 

Aside from work, Mr. Donnelly 
finds time to greet hundreds of visi- 
tors who come to his office and work- 
shop to view an exhibition of furni- 
ture used by the late Harriett Beecher 
Stowe. 

The centre of attraction is the old- 
fashioned writing desk upon which 
Airs. Stowe wrote the greater portion 
of "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Mrs. 
Stowe records in her memoirs that 
over this same desk, a tall, lanky 
stranger once greeted her, remarking 
"So you're the little lady who started 
the Civil War." The stranger was 
no other than the rail-splitting presi- 
dent, Abe Lincoln. We note for the 
interest of our readers, that Mr. Don- 
nelly's father-in-law is the son of 
Harriett Beecher Stowe. 

May King, owner of an attractive 
studio in Klamath Falls, Oregon, 
took advantage of a special excursion 
to San Francisco to come and see us. 

Ed. Johanson, formerly with Boye 
and Habenicht Studios, San Fran- 



ment in place of the owner, Frank 
Griffith, who died in November. 

C. E. Crompton, manager of 
Westminster Studios at 435 Powell 
Street, is rapidly acquiring an en- 
viable reputation for artistry in por- 
trait M'ork. This studio enjoys 
business from the most critical cus- 
tomers of photography, namely, the 
theatrical profession. Croaiption is 
a member of Photographers' Associa- 
tion of America and the Royal Pho- 
tographic Society of London. 

Mr. Cromption comes to San 
Francisco from Portland, Ore., where 
he was master photographer for the 
well known Stephens-Colmer Studios 
of that city. The ideal location and 
arrangements of the Westminster 
Studio, combining a conservative and 
quiet atmosphere, makes for the high- 
est degree of perfection in the repro- 
duction and making of portraits. 

Seven years ago, Frank Patter- 
son arrived in Medford, Oregon, 
with a trunk and $9.00 in cash. Re- 
cently he moved his location to Santa 
Rosa and installed sixteen tons of 
equipment and material valued at 
$40,000.00 Someday, we'll tell you 
more about him. 

Paul De Gaston with Mrs. De 
Gaston are now on their way on a 
trip around the world. He writes 
that they will be back home about 
1935. And we remember his story 
of how he hesitated to ask $100.00 
for a dozen prints! 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Mains, 
Visalia, after a very busy winter and 
spring, were recent visitors in San 
Francisco. Mrs. Mains is planning 
to spend a long summer vacation in 
Montana, her former home. 



Paffe seventeen 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



Grippit is Different 

in 8 Ways 



1 



3 



Transparent. Grippit is nearly as 
transparent as window glass. 



2 



Clean. Eub it up into little balls with 
your fingers and see how" they clean 
up after themselves like erasers. This 
is the reason why Grippit can be 
spread with even the daintiest fingers 
wdthout soiling them. 



Non-Wrinkling. Grippit holds even 
the thinnest tissue without a wrinkle. 
Scrap-books and mounted prints need 
never be anything but smooth and 
neat — if you use Grippit' 



4 



Stainless. Neither where Grippit is 
applied or removed is the slightest 
discoloration apparent. 



Fexible. The fact that Grippit still 
holds with all the tenacity of live rub- 
ber shows that it will not dry out and 
crack off with age. 



Fragrant. Grippit is blended from 
such pure ingredients that it leaves 
nothing but a clean, fresh odor to the 
finished work . 

7 

Waterproof. Does not soak off. 

8 

Removable. If you really wish to 
take off the print, insert a thin knife 
blade under one corner; then, taking 
that point between thumb and finger, 
slowly and carefully peel it back as 
if it were adhesive plaster! 

Grippit will hold labels on glass jars, tin boxes, icooden cases, or china-ware. 

It will hold patches an inner tubes and hot water bottles. . . . In fact, it has 

hundreds of i/ses nherever Paper, Cloth, Leather, etc., must he attached to 

M ood. Metal, Stone, or Glass. 

Grippit is More than a Paste 

PER TUBE PINT CANS 

$.25 $1.50 

12 tubes furiiislu\l in ilisphu cai'ton loi' ii-salc 
Write for resale jirices 

Order Today from Hirsch & Kaye 




m , 

l\i(/e eighteen 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 
{START A BONFIRE — from Pase 15} 

Standpoint, but on the other hand his loss is not so g-reat. His real 
solution lies in junking- all the old stuff, pocketing his loss, and 
making it up later by using mountings that are a little better in 
grade which will enable him to chai'ge a dollar or two more 
])er dozen. 

An even better way to do would be to have a big bonfire, and 
advertise the fact that in order to offer your customers only the 
very latest mountings, and to prove to them that you are not 
endeavoring to foist out-of-date styles upon them you will burn 
them up at a certain place on a cei-tain day. In this way you will 
get in advei-tising value every bit and more than the mountings 
are worth. By trying to sell them, even at cut prices, you merely 
block the sale of more profitable work later in the year. 

[From Abel's Photographic Weekly, January 25, 1930.] 



AFTER MAY 1 




Garfield 7370 




Increased Business requires increased 
Telephone Facilities 

HIRSCH & KAYE 
Your Logical Source of Supply 



Page nineteen 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 ] 



A Specialty Easel 

for Childreii''s Portraits 




The TOYLAND 

Is designed to take children's Portraits out of the rut of oftentimes needlessly 

low prices. 
Show it FIRST at YOUR price. If something less expensive is wanted you 

can always show your standard stjdes — but in most cases mothers will 

prefer this style, even at the necessary small increase in price, to the usual 

portrait style. It is designed for the occasion. 



Prices 

Sizes 



$12.00 and $13.50 per 100 
3x4 !/2 and 4x6 



They display well. We suggest that you order a small quantity' from your 
stockhouse. Show them in your display case, mounted, of course, with 
specimen prints. This type of a display creates attention and brings 
new business. 

Samples of both colors for 20 cents 

We will also send with these a circular 
describing other Specialty Mounters de- 
signed to produce profitable business. 

SAMPLE OFFER SS-32 

Tapprel^ Loomis & Co. 

(Eastman Kodak Company) Chicago, Illinois 



Page tiventy 



{; THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 




" J E R R Ij ' S " 


CORNER 


By HimSELF 



I came near being a salesman but Walking and dancing are the 

didnt get the job because I got too healthiest exercises but I won't take 
teck-nickle. It was like this. mine in a canoe. 



I was behind the counter watin 
for a package when a man ups to me 
an says, I want a camels hair brush. 
I ups to him an says we don't keep 
em. Why not, he ups to me, Because 
I says, none of our customens keeps 
a camel. 



An then, he tells me he wanted 
one of those brushes, made of camel 
hair, like was in The Focus last 
month, 

I just cant save any money. I 
thought I'd buy a meal ticket in a 
Third Street restaurant and save 
money that way. But I dropped the 
ticket and before I could pick it up 
a big lumberjack with hobnails in his 
shoes, stepped on it and punched out 
$\.^5 worth. 



Next time I see that big boy I'll 
invite liiTii to the shipping room where 
I'll lav out one of those rolls of Azo 
paper on the floor. Then if I can 
get him to sing and walk on the 
paper, I can get my nionev back by 
selling the roll to somebody with a 
player piano. 

Here's a swell idea I got to help 
H &: K sell more chemicals. I would 
put all the chemicals in red packages. 
Then when vou put them in your 
dark room you couldnt sec them and 
would order some more. 



Now there trying to get us to say 
margarine with a soft g. I got a 
better idea, Soft in svnnmer and hard 
in winter. 



The poor people are lucky. When 
they go to jail they dont get bothered 
by photographers. 



They say the next war will be a 
terrible mess, up in the air. But 
cooties can't fly. 



The poet that wrote about the still 
night lived before his neighbors had 
loud speakers. 

How come? — a day breaks but 
never falls while a night falls but 
ne\'er breaks. 



I read in the papers where people 
in Chicago spend 300 millions a year 
for their vegetables. And that dont 
include pineapples. 



Im sure my girl friend has the 
gift of painting — I can see it in her 
face. 



I told the shipping clerk his room 
reminded me of a nursery, shipping 
out Baby spotlights. Baby holders, 
Pako rockers, and Midget Printers. 

And he told me that was done so 
I \\'ould feel at home. 

Jerry. 



Paffc iiuenty-one 



{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



MUSLIN BANNER! 

for Photo Finishers Retail Stations 



#a)^lf*fe*S 




iGet'ein/ "T^ff 1lM%^ leaVe/ 
I Here/ F li^FlO em Here 



Made in Oil Colors 12 inches wide and 6 feet long 

J~ HESE can be attached to the awning of any retail station or put 
inside or outside of the window. They command attention of the 
prospective Photo Fan on the street who has films to be developed. 
These banners are ready for shipment on short notice. 

Numbers 1-2-3-5-6 . . . Red and Black 

Number 4 Red and Green 

Number 7 . . . . All Red - While Lettering 

PRICES 

One to five of each number . . . $1.00 each 



Six to 15 " " 
16 to 25 " " 
26 or more " 



Order bv number. 



. . . ■ .85 " 

... .70 " 

... .60 " 
Postage extra 

Send your orders now to 



MIESEI & EAYE 



Page inucniy-lvjo 



t THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



Photo Finishers 
Paper Windo^n^ Strips 



_ PMa 
Fmishr 



QIVE US A TRIAL' 



Irf IISDwlop^Prinl: 

^LL5*^ >our Films' 



ll^fteBetlciQrsdc' Prinllllg- 



]3ewlopia§*Prniljn§ 

« QA Hour Service ■• 



Dependable Service- 
Qualily Vorkmaaship- 

\. Wilh Out Pi«dIo Firushin/J' 



These Paper Strips are 6"x24" printed in black on white bond 
paper and will attract the eye and attention of the Amateur Photo 
Fan quickly. $5 50 per thousand of one kind; 85c per hundred of 
one kind; 1 to 25 assorted, 5c each; 26 to 50 assorted, 4c each; 
51 to 99 assorted, 3c each. 

Order from HIRSCH & KAYE 






^esolvec// 

Wthoutadoubt 
'e ours excels all others 




HERE ARE TWO MORE STYLES OF CARDS, SUCH AS ARE 
SUPPLIED WITH MONTHLY CARD SERVICE, PAGE 24. 



Paffc tivfrity-Z/iree 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 




HERE IS AN ADDITION to Our Advertising Material that is 
meeting- with the approval of a large number of Photo Finish- 
ers. A Die Cut Monthly Service Card I31/2" by 21" two cards 
to a set upon which you can mount prints each month, each card 
has a double winged easel attached so as to stand anywhere. 
Price 60 cents per set. Five sets minimum order each month. 
Your name printed on each card on 50 or more sets each month 
$3.00 extra. In this way you can have an individual window card. 

Send Your Orders Now 

Regular Monthly Service Cards are now Die Cut 

Each Month, With No Extra Charge 

Designs are changed during the year. Start using them Now 
and your dealers will be proud to display them. Size 11 by 14 inches. 



5 sets each month minimum order without easels - 
5 sets " " " " with " 



36 cents per set 
40 cents per set 



DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS SENT ON REQUEST 
Order today 

from HIRSCH & KAYE 



r^^ 

Page twenty-four 




a 



YouthFul 

expressions 
in child 
portraiture 



Portrait of AiitoincUi Sjlli> 
B) courle>y ol Cllll)er^Ol,. \.l,e%ille, N. C. 



THE flowerlike loveliness of 
children — an inspiration to 
every photographer who is 
susceptible at all — deserves 
both his utmost skill and the 
best materials he can find. 

The delicacy of 
Agfa Portrait Film, 
retained through 




as great a development build- 
up of density as the 
individual worker may desire, 
assures the perfect rendering 
of those charming youthful 
expressions which make child 
portraiture a delight 
as well as a profit- 
able occupation. 



» 



PORTRAIT 
FILM 



« 



AGFA ANSCOOF BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK 

Pa{/e tixienty-fi-vp 




{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 

Plenty of it, quickly available, 
and Low-priced! 



Turn on the Sunlight 
any Time you want it ! 

On dark daj's and at night — turn 
on the sunlight! Switch on FOTO- 
LIGHT'S brilliant light and take 
pictures of family events, parties, 
dances and the children at play! 
Also industrial scenes. 




The remarkable new 500-watt FOTOLITE 
provides as much light power as the average 
1000-watt lamp. 

See the new FOTOLITE No. 15 — with its 
newly designed reflector and new chemically 
treated reflector finish. It is second only to 
the famous FOTOLITE No. 10 with 1,000-watt 
lamp) and No. 15, when used with No. 10. 
provides a light which — for steadiness and 
power — is ideal for every interior shot. 

They are so easy to use. Can be carried 
anywhere in a room and plugged in on any 
electric light socket — ready for use in an 
instant. 

Now in stock at HIRSCH & KAYE 



Prices 

No. 10 (for 1000-watt bulb). Com- 
plete with carrying case (with- 
out bulb) * $19.00 

No. 15 (for 500-watt bulb). Com- 
plete with carrying- cases (with- 
out bulb) $16.00 

Carrying Case for No. 10 or No. 
15 Reflector $2.50 

Carrying Case for No. 10 or No. 
15 Stand 50c 

Diffusers for either style — each, $1.00 



When Retouching use A. W. Faber's 



THE FINEST PENCIL MADE 

17 degrees of hardness G degrees for positive 1 degree sepia 

WRHE US YOUR NEEDS OR TELL OUR SALESMEN 



Page tiventy-six 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



An Important Matter You 
May Have Overlooked 

Each month you receive state- 
ments, on which the date and 
amount of your purchases for the 
month are shown. The statement 
bears this notation: Reguhir 2% — 
10 days." 

Many of our readers take fullest 
advantage of this saving and we be- 
lieve more would if thev only realized 
what it will amount to. If the state- 
ment shows an amount overdue on the 
previous month, there is no cash dis- 
count. But assume that the statement 
shows payments due for the previous 
month only, and the amount, a typical 
monthly average is $100.00 Payment 
of this amount on or before the lOth, 
will earn $2.00 for you, or $24.00 a 
year. 

Perhaps you now say, "That's all 
very well, but where will I get 
$100.00 to pay you?" As a business 
man, you should have sufficient credit 
rating at your bank, or be able to 
submit security to negotiate a loan of 
$100.00. You may find it easier than 
you suppose. The interest on the loan 
will be 6% or $6.00 per year for 
$100.00 In other words, by paying 



$6.00 you can save $18.00 net per 
year. 

Three things will be accomplished. 
You will save money, you will estab- 
lish a relationship with your banker, 
and your credit with the stock house 
will be of the highest. 



A New Stunt in Press 
Photography 

American press photographers and 
reporters are presumed to be the most 
aggressive in the world, but it re- 
mained for a conservative illustrated 
weekly, the London Graphic, to de- 
vise a new way to photograph celeb- 
rities who shun publicity. 

A Doctor E. Salomon, who goes 
by the name of "Cyclops," has pro- 
vided himself with a small camera 
that he conceals in a napkin when 
attending banquets, and in the light 
of the room, is able to obtain pictures 
of celebrated people who would re- 
fuse to be photographed by other 
means. The article in "Time" from 
which this information was obtained, 
indicated the possession of quite a 
few pictures that would cause some 
comment if published. The photog- 
rapher's victims are totally unaware 
that they are posing for the pictures. 



Q. 



■•H 




SPECIFICATIONS 



MODEL 
"30" 



The NEW 

Type of sun . . . Hand cocking 

Operation of trigger, Thumb action 

Length over all . . 13 '/i inches 

Length of pan . . iVz inche.s 

Clergy Shur-Fire width of pan . . l;/ inches 

Flash Gun Depth of pan . . Yz inch 

u 

Height of back of pan, 2 inches 
^ I 3J *^^ Finish Nickel Plate 

HIRSCH & KAYE have it 



■Q 



Paffe tiventy-seven 



VK8 



{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 




Prints hacked with 
HollistonPhotoCloth 

are substantial — and 
theylookit.Theyhave 
firmness and "body" 
while retaining proper 
flexibility. They posi- 
tively will not fray at 
the edges. 

It's easy to mount 
prints with Holliston 
Photo Cloth. Seven 
standard sheet sizes, 
packed in handy car- 
tons. No paste, no 
waste, no scissors! 



Write j or 
samples 



Holliston Cloth 

IS I\ STOCK 

at HIRSCH & KAYE 





Thi 



Hawkeye 

Reminder 



A turn of the knob sets dial for the 
exact number of minutes you want 
piints or ne-^'atives to wash. Save 
youi' time and energy. A good, de- 
pendable clock. 



Price $7.50 



^ 



REDUCED PRICES 

on 
VICTOR POWDER 

Victor Flash Powder offers you the 
surest illumination for every kind of 
work. It comes in four grades: 



NORMAL— for general 
use, burns in l/38th 
second. 

SOFT — for inanimate 
objects and interiors, 
burns in l/12th sec- 
ond. 

EXTRA F A S T — for 
unusually active sub- 
jects, burns in l/.5.5th 
second. 

PORTRAIT — Recom- 
mended for use only 
in Victor Studio Flash 
Cabinet, burns in 
l/2.Tth second. 



'/2 ounce $0.50 

1 ounce 85 

2 ounce 1.55 




Fat/e t^vjenty-eujlit 



^ 
s^ 



[ THE FOCUS for APRIL, 1930 } 



Bargains for the Photographer 



HEAVY PRINTING FRAMES 

8 414x6^4 -- $ .65 ea. 

86 5x7 '. 1.00 " 

7 5x8 1.00 " 

32 61^2x81^ 1.25 " 

22 8x10 1.35 " 

4 10x12 2.35 " 

8 11x14 2.45 " 

8 14x17 3.25 " 

3 16x20 4.50 " 

] 18x22 5.75 " 

1 20x24 6.75 " 

.1 11x49 Circuit Print Frame with 
glass. 
Bargain Price $7.50 

6 No. 10 Pako Multiple Roll Holders. 
Bargain Price $1.00 ea. 

12 8x10 Core Plate Dev. Racks. 

Bargain Price $1.00 Lot 

No. 434-74-O.S. — Type E DeVry 35 
m/m Motion Picture Projector. 
Bargain Price $150.00 

No. 427-73— Model J 35 m/m De Vry 
Projector. 
Bargain Price $95.00 

No. 294-57 — DeVry Motion Picture 
Cam.era with F3.5 WoUensak lens 
and carrying case. U.^es sta.ndard 
size motion picture film. 
Bargain Price $95.00 

No. 341-63— Bell & Howell Eyemo 
Camera with Cooke F2.5 lens and 
carrying case. 35 m/m size. 
Bargain Price $137.50 

No. 195-45— Bell & Howell Eyemo 
Camera with Cook P"'2.5 lens and 
carrying case. 35 m/m size. 
Bargain Price $155.00 



NICHOLSON PERFECT DAYLIGHT 

lamp. Designed for colorists or 
wherever artificial light must be 
like daylight. Excellent condition. 

Bargain Price $15.00 

#14 PEARL CUTTER WITH BASE. 

For cutting paper, etc. in quantity. 
Blade is 14 inches long. Cuts clean 
and smooth. 

$95.00 

DIXON WHITE PENCILS. For writ- 
ing on dark surfaces. 
Bargain Price $ .75 dozen 

CLERGY FLASH GUNS. Last year's 
models. New, and in perfect con- 
dition. 

$15.00 each 

No. 357-65-3^x414 R.B. Auto Graf- 
lex without lens. Outfit includes 
one roll holder and carrying case. 

Bargain Price $65.00 

No. 391-69—4x5 R.B. Auto Graflex 
with Bausch & Lomb IC Tessar 
F4.5 lens. One plate holder. 

Bargain Price $75.00 

No. 334-62—4x5 R.B. Series B Graf- 
lex with K.A. 4x5 lens. One cut 
film holder. 

Bargain Price $67.50 

No. 241-50 — 5x7 Auto Graflex in car- 
rying case. No lens. 

Bargain Price $52.50 

No. 67-29 — 4x5 Auto Graflex with 
Krauss Tessar F4.5 lens. 
Bargain Price $60.00 



Page tivcnty-ninf 



Iff ^-^ ^ 

{ THE FOCUS for APRIL, J930 } : 




When Art lira Iris is selected for the print room . . . 
»\ in the background there is usually a conviction that 
'fj a better choice could not be made. 



There will be the rich, sparkling quality, the warm tone charac- 
teristic of the Iris print; and the proverbial Artiira depend- 
ability. 

Last, but not the least in importance, is the wide variety of 
pleasing surfaces, from which a selection can be made in perfect 
harmony with subject, style and treatment. 



DEFENDER 

of Bochester 





SURFACES : 






Semi-Matt 




Matt 


Buff Medium Rough Matt Buff Matt 




Plat Matt 


Buff Plat Matt 
-Veltex 




Plat Luster 


Buff Plat Luster 




Maroquin 


Buff Maroquin 
Monokrom (Rough Luster) 




Rose 


Olive Green Blue 
Monokrom (Silk) 
Rose and Green 




^Single Weight 

u 




^^ 



DEFENDER PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY Inc \ 

ROCHE STEIL.N.Y. 7 




ra{/r thirty 




Examine 

Tour 

Highlights 



Are the highlights in \o\\x negatives flattened 
into broad masses of one tone or do they 
build up to one high point so that you actually 
see highlights within your highlights? 

Fine gradation doesn't mean a flat negative 
— it means a negative with all the subtle 
variations of light and shade faithfully recorded, 
from the deepest shadows right up to the "live 
spots" in the highlights. 

In Eastman Portrait Film negatives you 
get "high-lights," "higher-lights" and then 
highest-lights. 



KK 



?? 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All dealer s 



Page thirty-one 




Put sunshine into your portraits of children 
— the warm, brilliant sunshine in which 
they live and laugh and find their happiness. 
The brilliant, high-keyed lightings, so 
suitable for child portraiture, take on 
the warmth of real sunshine when your 
prints are made on Vitava Athena V, W or 
X; all rich, ivory-tinted stocks, and having 
all of the quality characteristics of other 
grades of Vitava. You will find one of these 
Vitava papers worth standardizing for 
child portraiture. 



EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 
ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



All dealers'